Posts Tagged With: rosemary

Pizza with rosemary, olives and rocket

We love every kind of pizza, even with more savoury toppings… and we absolutely adore making as much noise as possible throwing the dough!

ourkitchngarden.net

Fresh from the garden: rosemary, rocket, onion, garlic, marjoram, olives
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 8 or 24 tastes 

Equipment:

  • A wooden chopping board & knives
  • A frying pan
  • Bowls – large, med, small
  • Salad spinner
  • Measures – ¼ cup, tablespoons, teaspoons
  • Colander, grater
  • Scales
  • Paper towel
  • Wooden spoon
  • 2 pizza trays
  • Metal spoons
  • Wide egg lifter
  • Pizza cutting wheels
  • Serving plates

 

 

 

 

Ingredients:

Tomato sauce:

  • 1 onion
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • A small handful marjoram
  • A small handful thyme
  • ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 tin diced tomatoes
  • Flaked salt and black pepper

For the pizza topping:

  • A stalk of rosemary
  • A clove of garlic
  • A small bowl or jar of plain olives
  • 1 tub bocconcini
  • Extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 30g parmesan
  • A handful rocket

What to do:

  • Preheat the oven to 220C.

For the tomato sauce:

  • Peel and finely chop the onion and garlic, reserving half of the garlic for the topping.
  • Heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil in the frying pan & gently cook the onion and garlic until translucent but not brown.
  • Open the tin of tomato and add to the frying pan with a pinch of salt and a grind of pepper.
  • Wash, dry and pick the marjoram and thyme. Roughly chop then add to the tomatoes.
  • Simmer gently for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until quite reduced.

For the topping: 

  • Wash the rosemary stalk and wipe dry. Strip the leaves and chop quite small.
  • Pit the olives, press the garlic clove then combine with the rosemary and 2 tablespoons olive oil in a small bowl.
  • Open the tub of bocconcini and cut each ball into 3 or 4 slices.
  • Wash and spin the rocket dry and then reserve in another large bowl.
  • Grate the parmesan and reserve in a small bowl.

Assembling the pizza:

  • Scatter some flour on the workbench, divide the dough into four and roll to form four thin ovals– you will fit two pizzas side-by-side on one oven tray.
  • Flour the trays first and then assemble the ovals onto the trays.
  • Usingthe metal spoons, swirl a couple of spoonfuls of tomato sauce onto the pizza bases, spreading so that they become totally covered with a clean border.
  • Layer the bocconcini on top, spoon on the garlicky olives, then slide the pizza trays into the oven.
  • Wash and dry the wooden chopping boards and set them out ready.

 Baking the pizza:

  • Bake the pizzas for about 12 minutes or until the edges are very crusty and the cheese is bubbling.
  • Use this time to make the dough for the next class if needed.
  • You may want to slip the pizza off the tray onto the rack for the last few minutes, so that you get a really crusty base.
  • Once the pizzasare done, transfer them to the wooden boards using the wide egg lifter.
  • Cut the pizzas in half first, and then each half into squares for each plate.
  • Lift onto serving plates and sprinkle with the rocket and parmesan.
  • Eat!

Notes: Where does pizza come from? What other sort of vegetables could you use in a pizza? What sort of other pizza could we make? What other cheeses could we use?

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Parmesan and dried rosemary biscuits

When I worked at bel mondo a few years ago for the Manfredis we used to serve the parmesan biscuits with little bowls of marinated olives to guests as they sat down at the table – and tried not to eat them while we worked!

ourkitchengarden.net

Parmesan biscuits & olives, simply

Fresh from the garden: rosemary, egg
Recipe source: adapted from a recipe by Steve Manfredi 
Makes: about 30 biscuits

Equipment:

  • Grater
  • Bowls – small
  • Fork
  • Paper towel
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Food processor
  • Scales
  • Cling film & baking paper
  • Baking sheets
  • Serving plates
Ingredients:

  • 80g parmesan
  • 1 egg
  • A few stalks of dried rosemary
  • 125g salted butter at room temperature
  • 250g plain flour
  • Cooking salt

 What to do:

  • Grate the parmesan. Crack the egg into the small bowl and lightly whisk with the fork.
  • Slide the rosemary leaves from the stalks and run them through the food processor. Then add in the salted butter, plain flour, grated parmesan, egg and a pinch of salt.
  • Pulse until they are well incorporated and the dough forms a ball. If the ingredients are too dry add a little water until the dough catches.
  • Remove from the processor, form the dough into a sausage about the diameter of a 50c piece, wrap in cling film and rest in the refrigerator for 20 minutes.
  • Preheat the oven to 180C and line the baking sheets with baking paper.
  • Cut the sausage into coins 3-4mm thick and place on the baking sheets.
  • Cook for 10-12 minutes until golden.

Notes: How is the dried rosemary different to the fresh? Why do we ‘rest’ the dough? What would you serve these biscuits with? What other herbs could you use?

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Our Bondi olives

These olives were picked from our own trees here at Bondi at the end of February and beginning of March this year. They spent about 2 months brining, both black and green, separated by harvest date & slit on two sides – the first week with a daily change of 1/3 of a cup of salt to a litre of water & then a weekly change of the same… In 2013 we harvested about 4.5kg of black and green combined & they have been brining for 2 months. This recipe is for preserving some olives & eating the rest – the jars of olives are even better after a week & will last undisturbed in the cupboard for at least 12 months; once opened will last for about a month in the fridge.

ourkitchengarden.net

Our olives!

Fresh from the garden: olives, rosemary, thyme, sage
Recipe source: Melissa
Makes: 3 jars plus a bowl to eat!

Equipment:

  • Slotted spoon
  • Paper towel
  • 3 small jars with metal lids
  • Knife – small
  • Baking tray
  • Saucepan
  • Oven mitts
  • Small ladle
  • 4 little bowls to serve with separate bowls for pits
Ingredients:

  • 500g black & green olives in brine
  • 1 sprig of rosemary
  • 2 sprigs of sage
  • A small handful of thyme sprigs
  • 4 garlic cloves
  • 1 orange
  • 2 teaspoons fennel seeds
  • 1 teaspoon coriander seeds
  • ½ teaspoon chilli flakes
  • 4 bay leaves
  • 2 or 3 cups extra-virgin olive oil

What to do:

  • Preheat oven to 160°C.
  • Thoroughly wash jars and lids in hot soapy water, rinse well and leave upside down to drain.
  • When the oven is ready, place jars right-side up on the baking tray and slip into the oven for 5-10 minutes until totally dry. Wipe the lids with paper towel to make sure perfectly dry.
  • Meanwhile scoop olives out of the tub and into the colander with the slotted spoon and rinse in cold water, checking each olive and discarding any that are mushy. Pat dry with paper towel.
  • Wash and thoroughly dry all the herbs and strip the leaves from their stalks.
  • Peel the garlic cloves and gently crush each clove with the back of a knife to break.
  • Carefully slice 1 cm-wide strips of zest from the orange, trying to take just the peel and none of the white pith.
  • Pour the olive oil into the saucepan and add the olives, herbs, chilli, bay leaves, fennel seeds, garlic and orange strips. Heat over medium-low heat until warm & smelling lovely.
  • Using oven mitts slide the tray of jars out of the oven. Using the ladle, carefully fill each jar with a good combination of olives, herbs, spices, orange peel, and garlic. Fill right to the top with olive oil and then seal each with its lid.
  • Spoon the remainder into the four little bowls and place each on a plate with a spare to catch the pits.

Notes: Why don’t we use the olives straight from the trees? Why are they green & black? What does ‘marinate’ mean? Why do we heat up the olive oil? What other ingredients could you use?

ourkitchengarden.net

Olives, jarred

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Crispy rosemary flatbread

Smittenkitchen says: Nothing could be easier than making this cracker, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t tell people you slaved all day over it because they’re going to be impressed, and I see no reason not to milk it. I think you could easily swap the rosemary for other herbs, such as thyme or tarragon, or punch it up with black pepper or other spices, but personally, I like it just the way it is here.

ourkitchengarden.net

Crispy crispy!

Fresh from the garden: rosemary
Recipe source: adapted by smittenkitchen.com from a recipe in Gourmet magazine
Serves: 8 or about 30 tastes

Equipment:

  • 3 heavy, large baking sheets
  • Paper towel
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Measures: cup, ½ cup, ¼ cup, tablespoon, ½ teaspoon
  • Baking paper
  • Large bowl
  • Rolling pins
  • Pastry brushes
  • Wire racks
  • Serving plates
Ingredients:

  • 3½ cups unbleached plain flour
  • 4 large sprigs rosemary
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon cooking salt
  • 1 cup water
  • 1/2 cup olive oil plus more for brushing
  • Flaky sea salt

What to do:

  • Preheat oven to 230°C with 3 heavy baking sheets inside.
  • Wash, dry and chop 1 sprig of rosemary.
  • Stir together flour, 1 tablespoon chopped rosemary, baking powder, and salt in a medium bowl. Make a well in centre, then add water and oil and gradually stir into flour with a wooden spoon until a dough forms. Knead dough gently on a work surface 4 or 5 times.
  • Divide dough into 3 pieces and roll out each piece separately on sheets of baking paper into shapes large enough to fit  each baking tray (shape can be rustic; dough should be thin).
  • Lightly brush the tops with additional oil and then strip the remaining rosemary, scattering small clusters of leaves on top, pressing in slightly. Sprinkle with flaked salt.
  • Slide rounds (still on baking paper) onto the preheated baking sheets and bake until pale golden and browned in spots, 8 to 10 minutes.
  • Transfer flatbread (discard baking paper) to racks to cool.
  • Break into pieces and serve.
  • Flatbread can be made 2 days ahead and cooled completely, then kept in an airtight container at room temperature. 

Notes: Why is this called flatbread? Why is this unleavened bread? What is kneading?

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Potato, rosemary & rocket pizza

I think it’s a law that every child should love pizza… and mine certainly do! This one’s a very different style to the usual however, as there’s no tomato nor mozzarella – or even pineapple! But delish nevertheless, and is also a leeeetle bit healthy…

ourkitchengarden.net

Potato, rosemary & rocket pizza

Fresh from the garden: potatoes, rosemary, rocket
Recipe source: adapted from Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden Cooking with Kids
Serves:  8 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

For the pizza dough:

  • Bowls – 1 small, 2 large
  • Fork
  • Scales
  • Measures: cup, ½ cup, tablespoon, teaspoon
  • Stand mixer with dough hook
  • Pastry brush
  • 2 large oven trays
  • Wide egg lifter
  • Large boards for cutting pizza
  • Pizza cutter

For the pizza topping:

  • Salad spinner
  • Scales
  • 2 clean, dry tea towels
  • Kitchen paper
  • Chopping board
  • Grater & peelers
  • Mandoline & mezzaluna
Ingredients:

For the pizza dough:

  • 1 cup lukewarm water
  • 3 teaspoons instant dry yeast
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1½ tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, plus extra for greasing
  • 400g plain flour, plus extra for flouring
  • 2 teaspoons cooking salt

For the pizza topping:

  • 3 handfuls rocket leaves
  • 100g parmesan cheese
  • 4 sprigs rosemary
  • 3 medium-to-large potatoes
  • 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil

 

What to do:

To make the dough:

  • Place the water, yeast and sugar in the small bowl. Mix with the fork and leave for 5–10 minutes until the mixture looks frothy.
  • Add the 2 teaspoons of oil to the yeast mixture and mix well.
  • Place the flour and salt and yeast mixture in the bowl of the stand mixer and beat for at least 8 minutes, until the dough looks smooth.
  • Brush the inside of a large bowl with a little of the extra virgin olive oil, using the pastry brush.
  • Turn the pizza dough into the oiled bowl. Cover with a clean, dry tea towel and put in a draught-free place until the dough has doubled in size. This process, which is called ‘proving’, will take at least 1 hour.

What to do:

Start of lesson:

  • Tip the risen dough onto the workbench and knead briefly, then shape it into a round ball and return it to the bowl.
  • Cover the bowl with the tea towel and leave again, this time for at least 20 minutes.
  • Preheat the oven to 200C. You can prepare the topping now while you wait for the oven to heat up.

For the topping:

  • Rinse the rocket leaves and dry them in the salad spinner. Shred the rocket into fine strips. Lay a piece of kitchen paper on a dry tea towel and spread the dry leaves over the paper and then roll the whole lot up like a log. Keep the rolled parcel of leaves in the refrigerator until needed.
  • Shave off pieces of parmesan using either a grater (if it has a wide slicing option) or a normal potato peeler.
  • Pull the rosemary needles from the stalks and chop them using the mezzaluna.
  • Peel the potatoes, washing them as you go, and slice them very thinly and very carefully using the mandoline & guard.
  • Tip the sliced potatoes into the large bowl and drizzle with most of the oil.
  • Add the rosemary and salt and pepper, then mix together so that all the slices are lightly oiled.

Assembling the pizza:

  • Scatter some flour on the workbench, divide the dough in two and roll to form two thin rectangles to fit the baking trays.
  • Assemble the pizzas directly onto the trays, flouring the trays first.
  • Arrange the slices of potato on the pizzas, overlapping them.
  • Sprinkle most of the Parmesan over the potato, keeping some aside.
  • Drizzle the pizzas with the last of the oil, then place the pizzas in the oven for about 10 minutes or until the edges are very crusty and the cheese is bubbling. 

Finishing off:

  • While the pizzas are baking you can make the dough for the next class (see above).
  • You may want to slip the pizza off the tray onto the rack for the last few minutes, so that you get a really crusty base.
  • Once the pizzas are done, transfer them to the wooden chopping boards using the wide egg lifter.
  • Cut the pizzas in half, and then into small slices or squares and then slide half a pizza onto each plate.
  • Top each with a handful of the shredded rocket leaves and remaining parmesan.

Notes: Where does pizza come from? What type of potatoes will you use here? What other sort of vegetables could you use in a pizza? What sort of other pizza could we make?

ourkitchengarden.net

Yes please, I’ll have another

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Rosemary & thyme grissini

Fresh from the garden: rosemary, thyme 

Recipe source: adapted from The Cook and the Chef TV program

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A simple & fun breadstick-making exercise – I’ve found that the thinner you make the grissini, the crunchier and more delicious they are. It also pays to knead the dough well too. These are fab with the hummus…

Equipment:

  • Kitchen towel
  • Chopping board
  • Large knife
  • Large bowl
  • Large spoon
  • Measuring jug
  • 2 baking trays
  • Pastry brush

 

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups plain flour
  • ½ teaspoon cooking salt
  • Large sprig rosemary
  • 4 or 5 sprigs thyme
  • 1 teaspoon yeast
  • ½ teaspoon brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 100ml lukewarm water
  • A pinch or two of flaked salt

What to do:

  • Preheat oven to 180°C
  • Wash & dry herbs thoroughly.
  • Strip herbs from stalks and chop up finely to yield 2 tablespoons of herbs.
  • Mix all the dry ingredients (except for the flaked salt) and herbs together in a large bowl.
  • Add the water and olive oil and knead together until a smooth dough is formed – this might take between five and ten minutes. If the dough is too wet just add some more flour, bit by bit.
  • Brush baking trays with a little olive oil.
  • Flatten the dough out and roll into a round pizza shape. Divide into halves, then quarters, and then again and again until you get 16 pieces of ‘pie’.
  • Roll each ball into a thin cigar shape, break into 2 & place evenly onto the baking trays.
  • Sprinkle the whole tray with a large pinch of salt.
  • Carefully slip the trays into the oven & bake for about 15 minutes until golden brown.

Notes: Grissini are thought to have been invented in Italy in the 17th century – what other dishes have originated in Italy?

 

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New recipes – Term 2

I’ve been absent for a while and realise now – so late – that it’s been months… where does the time go? I’m starting to feel like a cliche, in that the older I get, the quicker time flies. I’m always running late, I clearly never plan my time well and am forever trying to scrape through at the last minute…. and then see that the weeks fly past, and now we’re almost in July. Yikes!

Anyway,  my excuse for the absence is that I’ve dived back into the pool of employment and become what is statistically known as a ‘Working Mother’… hmmm. One child in daycare for four days, the other child can only fit in on two days so we also have a nanny on one day – and I’m only working for three days! My wage comes in one hand and goes straight out the other, it’s crazy. But I am enjoying the job, and also the enforced separation for my darlings – I relish picking them up from school having missed them all day, and love that they missed me too…

So my new job is my perfect job. Cooking with school children! The primary school students grow the veggies in the school garden; they harvest when the time is right; they prepare and cook the food; they share the food (and then they clean up!). It’s that simple.

Cooking with the kids

We have been cooking up a storm at school recently & I thought I’d share a recipe from one of the most popular dishes: Rocket, silverbeet & potato soup. This has been such a hit (I think it’s all the garlic) and is perfect for the cold wintry days we’ve been having…

and here in full is another easy & fun recipe to do at home:

 Rosemary & Thyme Grissini

 Fresh from the garden: Rosemary, thyme

 Recipe source: The Cook and the Chef TV program

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

A simple & fun bread-making exercise – I’ve found that the thinner you make the grissini, the crunchier and more delicious they are! It also pays to knead the dough well too.

Equipment:
  • Kitchen towel
  • Chopping board
  • Large knife
  • Large bowl
  • Large spoon
  • Measuring jug
  • 2 baking trays
  • Pastry brush
  • Rolling pin

 Ingredients:

  • 2 cups plain flour
  • ½ teaspoon cooking salt
  • Large sprig rosemary
  • 4 or 5 sprigs thyme
  • 1 teaspoon yeast
  • ½ teaspoon brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 100ml lukewarm water
  • A pinch or two of flaked salt

What to do:

  • Preheat oven to 180°C
  • Wash & dry herbs thoroughly
  • Strip herbs from stalks and chop up finely to yield 2 tablespoons of herbs
  • Mix all the dry ingredients (except for the flaked salt) and herbs together in a large bowl
  • Add the water and olive oil and knead together until a smooth dough is formed – this might take between five and ten minutes. If the dough is too wet just add some more flour, bit by bit
  • Brush baking trays with a little olive oil
  • Flatten the dough out and roll into an even rectangle shape. Divide into halves, then quarters, and then again and again until you get 32 pieces
  • Roll each ball into a thin cigar shape with floured hands & place evenly onto the baking trays
  • Sprinkle with flakes of salt
  • Carefully slip the trays into the oven & bake for about 15 minutes until golden brown

Notes: Grissini are thought to have been invented in Italy in the 17th century – what other dishes have originated inItaly?

Here also is a list of recipes of other lovely dishes the children have been making this term:

Basic pasta dough

Linguine with herb sauce

Baked ricotta slices with capsicum & tomato

Gnocchi with burnt butter & sage

Carrot & coriander soup

Eggplant, garden herb & bocconcini pizza

Happing reading, happy eating!

Categories: Kitchen Garden, Recipe | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

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