Posts Tagged With: gluten-free

Lemon myrtle tea

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We make all sorts of herbal tea variations at Bondi, using aromatic lemongrass leaves, lemon balm, lemon verbena, mint, lemon thyme, chamomile, citrus rind and ginger… The tea is easy to make and lovely chilled from the fridge overnight too, once the tea has brewed just remove the leaves so that it doesn’t stew.

Foraged bush tucker: lemon myrtle leaves
Recipe source: Melissa Moore
Makes: 3 litres

Equipment:

  • Stockpot
  • Serving jugs

 

Ingredients:

  • A bunch of lemon myrtle leaves
  • 3 litres water

 

What to do:

  • Fill the stockpot with water and set it on high to boil with the lid on.
  • Rinse the bunch of leaves well in cold water and shake dry. Remove the leaves from the branch, discarding the branch.
  • Once the water is boiling, turn the pot off and carefully drop the herbs in.
  • Let the tea steep for several minutes and serve, ladling the tea carefully into jugs.

Notes: What else is herbal tea know as? What other herbs or spices could you use? What does aromatic mean?

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Broccoli and lemon myrtle risotto

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This lovely risotto is textural and beautifully herby – especially with the subtle lemony tang of the lemon myrtle leaves – and very easy once you get past all the stirring! Serve just before eating while it’s still slightly soupy.

Foraged bush tucker: lemon myrtle leaves
Recipe source: Melissa Moore
Serves: 6 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Saucepan
  • Measures: scales, jug, cup, ¼ cup, tablespoon
  • Salad spinner
  • Garlic press
  • Mixing bowls
  • Chopping boards & knives
  • Grater & microplane zester
  • Ladle
  • Wooden spoon with a straight end
  • Heavy based stockpot
  • 4 soup plates or bowls to serve
Ingredients:

  • 1.5 litres water with 2 tablespoons bouillon (or 1 litre stock)
  • 3 lemon myrtle leaves
  • 1 brown onion
  • 3 garlic cloves
  • 1 large stalk broccoli
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 20g butter
  • 300g Arborio rice
  • 40g parmesan or grana padano
  • A small handful marjoram
  • Flaked salt & black pepper

What to do:

  1. Pour the water and bouillon into a saucepan, and bring it to a boil. When boiling, turn down to bare simmer and add the lemon myrtle leaves.
  2. Peel and finely chop the onion. Squeeze the garlic cloves through the press into a small bowl.
  3. Wash the broccoli & shake dry. Chop the stems into ½ cm pieces and add stems to the stock, reserving the florets. Wash the leaves, strip from the stalks and finely slice the leaves.
  4. Heat the olive oil and butter over medium heat in the stockpot. Add the chopped onion and cook gently for about three minutes until translucent but not brown. Add the garlic and cook gently for another few seconds.
  5. Stir in the rice until the grains separate and begin to crackle.
  6. Begin adding the simmering stock, a ladle at a time, and stir in. The stock should just cover the rice and bubble. Stir every minute or so for about 15 minutes.
  7. After about 10 minutes, add the broccoli florets & sliced leaves to the rice and keep stirring for about another 5 minutes. When the rice is just tender all the way through but still slightly firm, usually in about 20 minutes all up, it is done.
  8. Meanwhile, weigh and cut the parmesan & grate it. Wash and spin dry the marjoram, strip and discard the stems.
  9. Add the last ladleful of stock and the rest of the broccolini in to the rice. Stir in the marjoram and parmesan, and remove from the heat. Taste now and check the seasoning. The mixture should be creamy and lose.
  10. Serve into the bowls and eat right away!

Notes: What sort of rice is Arborio? Why do we use this sort of rice? Why do we fry the rice off first? What does ‘yield’ mean? What do lemon myrtle leaves look like?

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Roasted winter veggies with rosemary honey drizzle

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The colder weather brings us fennel, cauliflower and carrots and they’re delicious drizzled in buttery honeyed goodness!

Fresh from the garden: fennel, cauliflower, carrot, potato, rosemary
Recipe source: Melissa Moore
Serves: 6 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Large rimmed baking tray
  • Baking paper
  • Paper towel
  • Chopping boards and knives
  • Colander
  • Salad spinner
  • Mixing bowls
  • Spatula
  • Scales
  • Measures: ¼ cup, tablespoon, teaspoon
  • Small saucepan
  • Serving bowls
Ingredients:

  • 3 or 4 large carrots
  • Half a small cauliflower
  • A couple of fennel
  • 2 large potatoes
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1½ teaspoons coarse salt
  • 25g unsalted butter
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1 sprig fresh rosemary

 

What to do:

  1. Preheat oven to 220C. Line a large rimmed baking sheet with baking paper and set aside.
  2. Scrub the potatoes under running water and wipe dry. Without peeling, chop them into 2cm cubes by cutting into slices first, then rods, then cubes.
  3. Wash and shake dry the cauliflower and chop into small florets and cubes.
  4. Scrub the carrots and peel, then slice into small chunks.
  5. Wash the fennel, taking care to rinse out any hidden dirt. Chop into smallish pieces.
  6. In a large bowl, toss together all the veggies with the oil and salt until well combined. Place in an even layer on prepared baking sheet.
  7. Transfer to oven and roast, turning with a spatula once or twice during cooking, until browned and turnips are easily pierced with a paring knife, for about 25 minutes.
  8. Meanwhile, wash the rosemary sprig and wipe dry with paper towel. Strip the needles from the stalk and finely chop using a large knife. We will need about a tablespoon worth.
  9. Melt the butter in a small saucepan over medium heat. Add honey and rosemary, let simmer for a few seconds and remove from heat.
  10. Transfer veggies to serving bowls and drizzle with butter mixture. Toss to combine and serve.

Notes: What other winter veggies can you name? What does fennel smell like?

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Kerry’s Tasty Daal

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This is easy to make and delicious! Add a few flakes of chilli if you like it spicy.

Fresh from the garden: onion, garlic, capsicum, ginger, tomato, coriander
Recipe source: Melissa’s friend Kerry
Serves: 4 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Kettle
  • Measures: jug, cup, tablespoon, teaspoon
  • Potato peeler
  • Chopping boards and knives
  • Food processor
  • Stockpot
  • Flat-edged wooden spoon
  • Serving bowls

 

 

 

Ingredients:

  • 500ml water and a tablespoon of bouillon (or 500ml veggie stock)
  • 1 small onion
  • 2 cloves of garlic
  • ½ red capsicum
  • 2cm knob of ginger
  • 1 large tomato
  • Rice Bran oil
  • 1 teaspoon mustard seeds
  • 1 cup red lentils
  • 1 teaspoon turmeric
  • 1 teaspoon cumin powder
  • 1 small can of coconut milk
  • Salt & pepper to taste
  • Small bunch of fresh coriander

What to do:

  1. Fill the kettle with half a litre of water and set it to boil. When boiled pour it into the measuring jug, add the tablespoon of bouillon and stir.
  2. Peel and finely chop the onion and garlic. Wash and finely chop the half capsicum. Peel the skin from the ginger and finely chop.
  3. Wash and finely chop the tomato. Wash the coriander and spin dry. Chop stems and leaves.
  4. Heat a couple of tablespoons of oil in the stockpot and add the mustard seeds. Once they start popping add the chopped onions and capsicum and fry for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the garlic and ginger, then fry for another minute.
  5. Add lentils and fry for 2 minutes, then add turmeric & cumin powder.
  6. Add a bit of the bouillon water and half the tin of coconut milk, then just keep adding little bits of each until all absorbed, stirring as you go.
  7. After 5 minutes add the chopped tomato and a sprinkle of salt and pepper.
  8. Once lentils are soft (usually 20 minutes or so) divide into serving bowls and garnish with the chopped coriander. 

Notes: What is turmeric? What family do lentils come from?

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Warm salad of bok choy, roasted eggplant and tomatoes

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This salad can be adapted to pretty much anything you’ve got in your garden, fridge or pantry! You can add cheese, or a boiled egg or two, a tin of tuna or some roast chicken…

Fresh from the garden: eggplant, bok choy, tomatoes, basil,
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 4 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Chopping boards and knives
  • Baking tray
  • Baking paper
  • Pastry brush
  • Citrus juicer
  • Mixing bowls
  • Stick blender and cup
  • Measures: ¼ cup, tablespoon
  • Wok
  • Colander
  • Serving bowls
Ingredients:

  • One large eggplant
  • A lemon
  • A couple of sprigs of basil
  • A clove of garlic
  • ¼ cup olive oil plus extra to brush
  • Aged balsamic vinegar
  • Flaked salt and black pepper
  • A large handful of bok choy
  • A handful of little tomatoes
  • A log of soft goats’ cheese

 What to do:

To prepare the veggies:

  1. Preheat your oven to 180C.
  2. Wash and dry the eggplant. Trim the top end off and cut into thin slices. Cover a baking tray with baking paper and place the eggplant slices on top. Brush with a little olive oil, then slide into the oven and roast for 10 minutes until lightly browned.
  3. While the eggplant is roasting, juice the lemon, peel the garlic and wash the basil, picking the leaves and spin-drying them. Combine together the lemon juice, a pinch of salt, a grind of pepper, ¼ cup olive oil, garlic and most of the basil (reserving a few leaves for garnish) in a stick blender cup and whizz until totally smooth. Take the eggplant out of the oven and flip over. Brush the basil mixture over top and bake again for another 5 minutes or until cooked through and browning.
  4. Wash the bok choy, opening up the leaves slightly to dislodge any dirt, and shake dry over the sink. Slice the bok choy lengthways down the middle, and again into quarters. Heat the wok over a medium flame and pour about a tablespoon of olive oil in, and then the bok choy with a pinch of salt and a drizzle of balsamic vinegar. Cook for a few minutes until the leaves have wilted and the bulb part is beginning to blacken slightly.
  5. Wash the tomatoes, remove the stalks and slice – or if small, gently cut in half.

To assemble the salad:

  1. Remove the eggplant from the oven and leave to cool for a few minutes.
  2. Divide the cooked bok choy into serving bowls, and then scatter the eggplant pieces on top, and then the tomatoes. Open the packet of goats’ cheese and sprinkle blobs over the veggies.
  3. Drizzle over a little olive oil and balsamic with a pinch of salt and black pepper, and scatter over basil leaves torn into small pieces.

Notes: What is balsamic vinegar? Can you eat raw eggplant? What family does eggplant belong to?

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The best pumpkin soup ever!

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This classic soup recipe has got to be the easiest one of all – and takes no time to cook! If you want to be a bit grown-up you can also garnish with some lightly toasted pine nuts and a dollop of Greek yoghurt but my kids like it just as it is…

Fresh from the garden: pumpkin, leek, thyme, coriander
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 6 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Kettle
  • Chopping boards & knives
  • Mixing bowls
  • Measures: tablespoon
  • Scales
  • Salad spinner
  • Large stockpot
  • Stick blender
  • Ladle
  • Serving bowls
  • Scissors
Ingredients:

  • 1kg pumpkin, any type
  • One large leek
  • A small bunch of thyme
  • 20g butter
  • Olive oil
  • A tablespoon of ground cumin
  • A tablespoon of ground coriander
  • 1.5 litres water
  • 2 tablespoons bouillon
  • Flaked salt and black pepper
  • A small bunch of coriander

 What to do:

  1. Fill the kettle to 1.5 litres and set it to boil.
  2. Wash the pumpkin then place on a chopping board and scoop out all the seeds and membranes, saving for the chooks. Carefully slice off the skin – you may need to chop it up into a few smaller pieces first – then slice the pumpkin flesh into thin slices and reserve.
  3. Wash the leek under running water, trimming off the root and outer rough leaves, and slicing half way down the middle lengthways and peeling out to release any dirt trapped inside. Then slice into thin rings.
  4. Wash the thyme and dry it, then strip off the leaves and reserve. Wash the coriander and spin dry and reserve.
  5. Heat the butter and a glug of olive oil in the stockpot until bubbling, then add the chopped leek, the thyme and a good pinch of salt. Cook, stirring occasionally for a few minutes until the leek softens.
  6. Add in the sliced pumpkin and the two spices and stir again, then put the lid on the stockpot and turn right down to the lowest simmer for 5 minutes.
  7. Add in the boiling water until just covering the pumpkin, add in the bouillon with a grind of pepper and simmer for another 10 minutes.
  8. Meanwhile using the scissors, snip the coriander stalks and leaves into tiny pieces
  9. Plug in the stick blender and whizz until super-smooth. Taste to check if there is enough salt and add if needed.
  10. Ladle into bowls and garnish with coriander snips and serve straight away!

Notes: Where does the dirt hide in a leek? Is pumpkin skin edible?

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Kale, potato and egg soup

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Amazing what you can put in a soup isn’t it? Sounds very simple this one, but the flavours and bold and bright at the end. And it’s perfect for this freezing, wintry and blustery day…

Fresh from the garden: potatoes, garlic, kale, eggs
Recipe source: adapted from a recipe on thekitchn.com
Serves: 4 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Chopping boards & knives
  • Garlic press
  • Measures: tablespoon, teaspoon
  • Medium stockpot
  • 4 little bowls or ramekins
  • Ladle
  • Microplane grater
  • 4 serving bowls

 

Ingredients:

  • 2 medium yellow potatoes
  • 3 garlic cloves
  • 1 teaspoon cooking salt
  • 1.5 litres water
  • 2 tablespoons bouillon
  • 1 bunch kale (about 15 big leaves)
  • 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar
  • 4 large eggs
  • Flaked salt and pepper
  • 20g grana padano or parmesan cheese
  • Extra-virgin olive oil

What to do:

  1. Scrub the potatoes then chop it onto centimetre cubes. Peel the garlic cloves and squeeze them through the garlic press.
  2. Add potato, garlic, salt, water and bouillon to a medium stockpot over medium-high heat. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to simmer.
  3. While the potatoes start to cook, wash the kale and shake dry over the sink. Remove any thick, tough stems and chop them into tiny pieces. Add the chopped stems to the pot with the potatoes and simmer for 2 minutes.
  4. Stack the leaves of kale on top of each other. Slice them crosswise into thin ribbons, and add them to the pot with the potatoes and kale stems. If necessary, add more stock or water to the pot to just about cover the kale.
  5. Cover the pot and let the soup cook for 8 to 10 minutes. The soup is ready when the potatoes are easily pierced with a fork, and when a ribbon of kale has become tender, but has not yet become stringy or pulpy. Stir in the vinegar. Taste and season with more salt and fresh cracked pepper. Also add more stock or water if a more liquid soup is desired.
  6. To finish, crack the eggs into little bowls, and then gently slide them into the soup. Ladle some of the soup broth on top of the eggs to submerge them. Put the lid back on the pot and cook for 4 minutes. When done, the whites of the eggs should be opaque, but the yolk should still be soft. If the eggs break into the soup before they are poached, just use a fork to swirl them into the soup.
  7. Carefully spoon the eggs into a soup bowls. Ladle the soup on top. Finish with a grating of grana padano cheese and a thin drizzle of olive oil and serve.

Notes: What else could you put into a soup? What else could you use instead of kale?

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Categories: Kitchen Garden, Recipe, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Popping corn with two flavours

 

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We made this recipe in my first lesson back in 2011, and just recently grew another crop of the little hard cobs.

Fresh from the garden: dried popcorn cob, rosemary, thyme
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 6 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • 2 tea towels
  • A large sieve
  • 2 large saucepans with lids
  • A small saucepan
  • Tongs
  • Large spoon
  • 8 small serving bowls

 

 

Ingredients:

  • 6 tablespoons Rice Bran oil
  • 3 cobs popping corn
  • A few sprigs rosemary
  • A few sprigs thyme
  • 50g butter
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • 2 teaspoon table salt
  • 1 teaspoon sugar

What to do:

  1. Rub corncobs all over with a tea towel to remove any dust.
  2. Wash & carefully dry the herb sprigs.
  3. Pick off each corn kernel from the husk and place in the sieve. Once all removed, shake the sieve a little to dislodge the crispy end bits.
  4. Pour half the oil into each saucepan and add herb sprigs to one.
  5. Heat herbs until the oil simmers for five minutes to infuse the oil. Remove herbs.
  6. Turn heat up, add half the corn to each saucepan and immediately put lid on.
  7. Melt the butter with the spices, sugar and half the salt in the smaller saucepan and stir until the sugar has dissolved.
  8. After a minute the corn should start popping, turn heat down and wait until the noise almost stops. Then shake the saucepan while holding lid down to dislodge any tricky pieces.
  9. Only lift the lid when all popping has stopped! Then, turn heat off and lift the lid.
  10. To the herb popcorn: sprinkle the other half of the salt in, give a good stir and pour out into four small bowls.
  11. To the plain popcorn: pour over the spiced butter, stir well and pour into remaining four bowls.

Notes: What is the difference between popping corn and sweetcorn? What does savoury mean? Do you think popcorn is an old food or a modern food?

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Creamy polenta with crispy sage

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This is such a vibrant and comforting dish, with the frizzled sage leaves giving everything a crispy, savoury lift.

From the garden: sage, garlic
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 4 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Chopping board &small knife
  • 1 heavy-based saucepan & lid
  • Scales
  • Measuring jug
  • Grater
  • 1 small saucepan
  • Salad spinner
  • Paper towel
  • Wooden spoons
  • Bowls – 4 small
  • Deep-sided frying pan
  • Serving bowls
Ingredients:

  • 250ml milk plus extra 100ml on standby
  • 250ml water
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1/2 cup fine polenta
  • 1/3 cup mascarpone
  • 50g grana padano parmesan
  • 25g butter
  • A branch of sage leaves
  • Flaked salt and black pepper

What to do:

  1. Bring the milk, water and bay leaf to the boil in the larger saucepan then remove from heat and allow to infuse for 20 minutes. Strain and discard the bay leaf, bring to the boil again, pour in the polenta and stir continuously until it thickens, about 10-20 minutes, depending on the variety of polenta.
  2. Meanwhile grate the parmesan and measure out the mascarpone.
  3. When the polenta is cooked, add the mascarpone and grated parmesan and mix until well combined. Taste for seasoning and add more salt if necessary. The polenta should be soft and creamy and only just hold its shape. You may need to add a little extra of the standby milk to loosen up the polenta if it becomes too stiff – this will also depend on what brand of polenta you use. You want a sloppy, porridge type consistency.
  4. Pick the sage leaves, then wash and spin them dry. With about a minute to go, heat the butter in the small saucepan over medium heat. Add the sage leaves and cook until they are dark green, crispy and fragrant and the butter is bubbling and turning brown.
  5. To serve, divide polenta among serving bowls. Season generously and scatter with the frizzled sage leaves & browned butter. 

Notes: What is polenta? What is cooking by ‘absorption’ method? What is mascarpone?

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Mandarine marmalade

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Preserving food – like making jam or pickling veggies – sounds like it’s going to be really difficult. But sometimes it isn’t! Especially if you stick to small batches of produce…

Fresh from the garden: mandarines, lemon
Recipe source: adapted from a recipe by Billy Law on atablefortwo.com.au
Makes: about 500ml

Equipment:

  • Chopping boards & knives
  • Large & med mixing bowls
  • Muslin cloth or Chux
  • Citrus juicer
  • Large stockpot
  • 3 small saucers
  • Scales
  • Cup measure
  • Spatula
  • Wooden spoon with flat end
  • 2 or 3 small jars
Ingredients:

  • 1kg mandarines
  • 600g sugar
  • 3 cups of water
  • 1/2 lemon

 

What to do:

  1. Peel mandarines carefully, trying to keeping peels in one piece if possible. Then cut half of the peels into thin strips (julienne strips) – as thin as possible – and set aside.
  2. Remove as much of the white pith as possible and set aside.
  3. Gently cut the mandarines in half crosswise, remove the seeds and set aside too. Use a clean muslin cloth or new piece of Chux, wrap the seeds and pith together tightly.
  4. Juice the half lemon.
  5. Add mandarines, peel strips, the parcel of pith and seeds, lemon juice, sugar and water into a large pot. Stir constantly over medium heat, without boiling, until sugar is dissolved.
  6. Bring to the boil, then reduce heat down to medium and let it bubble away for about 30 minutes, stirring occasionally until set point is reached.
  7. Set point testing: Put a saucer in the freezer and chill it. Take it out when ready to test, add a dollop of jam onto saucer. Draw a line on the jam with a knife, if it wrinkles, then the jam is ready. If not, keep boiling the mixture for another 10 minutes and test again.
  8. Once ready, remove the parcel and discard the pith and seeds. Pour the marmalade into hot sterilised jars. Seal 15 mins later, or when the jars are cool enough to handle.
  9. How to sterilise jars: Preheat oven to 160C. Wash jar with warm water and a spot of dish washing liquid, drain, leave on a baking tray right side up and put in the oven. Let it sterilise for at least 20 minutes. Time it well so you take the jars out of the oven when your marmalade is ready. DO NOT add cold food into the hot jar, or vice versa as it will shatter. Seal the jar when it’s cool enough to handle.

Notes: What does preserving mean? What is pith? What is the set point?

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