Posts Tagged With: preserves

Mandarine marmalade

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Preserving food – like making jam or pickling veggies – sounds like it’s going to be really difficult. But sometimes it isn’t! Especially if you stick to small batches of produce…

Fresh from the garden: mandarines, lemon
Recipe source: adapted from a recipe by Billy Law on atablefortwo.com.au
Makes: about 500ml

Equipment:

  • Chopping boards & knives
  • Large & med mixing bowls
  • Muslin cloth or Chux
  • Citrus juicer
  • Large stockpot
  • 3 small saucers
  • Scales
  • Cup measure
  • Spatula
  • Wooden spoon with flat end
  • 2 or 3 small jars
Ingredients:

  • 1kg mandarines
  • 600g sugar
  • 3 cups of water
  • 1/2 lemon

 

What to do:

  1. Peel mandarines carefully, trying to keeping peels in one piece if possible. Then cut half of the peels into thin strips (julienne strips) – as thin as possible – and set aside.
  2. Remove as much of the white pith as possible and set aside.
  3. Gently cut the mandarines in half crosswise, remove the seeds and set aside too. Use a clean muslin cloth or new piece of Chux, wrap the seeds and pith together tightly.
  4. Juice the half lemon.
  5. Add mandarines, peel strips, the parcel of pith and seeds, lemon juice, sugar and water into a large pot. Stir constantly over medium heat, without boiling, until sugar is dissolved.
  6. Bring to the boil, then reduce heat down to medium and let it bubble away for about 30 minutes, stirring occasionally until set point is reached.
  7. Set point testing: Put a saucer in the freezer and chill it. Take it out when ready to test, add a dollop of jam onto saucer. Draw a line on the jam with a knife, if it wrinkles, then the jam is ready. If not, keep boiling the mixture for another 10 minutes and test again.
  8. Once ready, remove the parcel and discard the pith and seeds. Pour the marmalade into hot sterilised jars. Seal 15 mins later, or when the jars are cool enough to handle.
  9. How to sterilise jars: Preheat oven to 160C. Wash jar with warm water and a spot of dish washing liquid, drain, leave on a baking tray right side up and put in the oven. Let it sterilise for at least 20 minutes. Time it well so you take the jars out of the oven when your marmalade is ready. DO NOT add cold food into the hot jar, or vice versa as it will shatter. Seal the jar when it’s cool enough to handle.

Notes: What does preserving mean? What is pith? What is the set point?

Categories: Kitchen Garden, Recipe | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Cornersmith’s bouillon

This recipe comes to us from the picklery Cornersmith in Marrickville. Bouillon is what we use instead of stock in all our soup and risotto recipes. The aim of the recipe is to use up excess vegetable parts – carrot tops, fennel tops, spinach stems, parsley stems etc.The recipe can be varied with the seasons by adding what you have on hand.

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: leeks, fennel, carrots, parsley, mint, coriander, onions
Recipe source: adapted from a recipe from the Cornersmith Café
Makes: 4 medium jars

Equipment:

  • Jars and lids
  • Large oven tray
  • Paper towel
  • Scales
  • Chopping boards & knives
  • Peelers
  • Large mixing bowls
  • Salad spinner, colander
  • Scissors
  • Wooden spoons
  • Food processor
  • Funnel, teaspoons
Ingredients:

  • 200g brown onions
  • 200g leeks
  • 200g fennel
  • 200g Dutch carrots
  • 200g celery
  • Carrot tops
  • 1 bunch parsley
  • 1 bunch mint
  • 1 bunch coriander
  • 40 sundried tomatoes
  • 1 head garlic
  • 200g fine cooking salt

What to do:

  1. Wash the jars and lids in hot soapy water, rinse well and drain upside down. Place all the jars onto an oven tray, right side up, and slide into the oven. Turn the oven on to 160C to sterilize for 15 minutes.
  2. Dry the lids with a clean piece of paper towel.
  3. Wash all the vegetables and scrub if needed. Trim any ugly bits and discard. Peel the onion & garlic, and carrots if needed.
  4. Wash the herbs, spin dry and finely snip, discarding any tough stalks.
  5. Using a large knife, chop all vegetables into small sized chunks. Snip the sun-dried tomatoes into thin slices using scissors.
  6. In batches if necessary, add the ingredients to the food processor.
  7. Process into a thick paste and then scrape out into a clean and dry large bowl. Mix the ingredients thoroughly with the salt so it is mixed in evenly. You can use your hands for this but beware of the onion fumes in your eyes!
  8. Put the funnel into the top of the sterilized jars.
  9. Fill the jars without touching any of the inside or rims, and seal tightly.
  10. You may want to ‘can’ the jars in a water-bath to preserve longer: Line a wide saucepan or stockpot with a rubber mat or tea towel, then place the full, sealed jars in so that none are touching the sides of the pot or each other. Fill with lukewarm water and then set to boil on high for between 10 and 20 minutes. Turn off then using tongs, carefully lift out the jars and leave to cool on a wooden board. Label when cool.

Notes: This is used as a replacement to stock: one tablespoon dissolved in 1 litre of boiling water. It can be added to stews and soups or any meals that need a boost of flavour.

Bouillon will last for a year unopened and stored in a cool dark place. Once opened, store it in the fridge and it should last you for at least 6 months.

ourkitchengarden.net

Categories: Kitchen Garden, Recipe, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Rhubarb and vanilla jam

This must be the easiest jam to make in the whole wide world! And, as with all jam-making, small quantities are best: quickest to prepare and also to bring up to that all-important setting point. And if you find you don’t have the exact kilo of prepared fruit, just weigh out the equivalent amount of sugar.

Fresh from the garden: rhubarb, lemon

Recipe source: Melissa

Makes: 3 or 4 medium jars

Equipment:

  • 4 medium jars with good lids
  • Oven tray
  • Paper towel
  • 3 small saucers
  • Chopping boards and knives
  • Scales
  • Citrus juicer
  • Heavy-based wide stockpot
  • Wooden spoon with flat edge
  • Spatula
  • Small serving bowls
Ingredients:

  • 1kg rhubarb
  • 1kg sugar
  • 1 vanilla pod
  • 1 large lemon

What to do:

To sterilise jars:

  1. Wash your jars in hot, soapy water, rinse and then drain them upside-down.
  2. Place on an oven tray right-side-up and slide them into the oven. Turn on the oven to 160C. Leave them there until
  3. Wash the lids, rinse and drain them. Wipe them dry with a piece of paper towel and keep your fingers away from the inside of the lid!

To make the jam:

  1. Put 3 small saucers in the freezer.
  2. Wash the rhubarb stalks and trim the edges. Slice each stalk into 3cm pieces and weigh to make sure you have 1kg.
  3. Slice the vanilla pod lengthways and scrape out the seeds, then cut each pod half into two.
  4. Cut the lemon in half and squeeze out the juice.
  5. Put the rhubarb into a preserving pan or a heavy-based wide stockpot with the measured sugar, vanilla seeds and pods. Heat gently, stirring, until all the sugar has dissolved, then squeeze in the lemon juice and increase the heat.
  6. Boil for about 10 minutes until the fruit is soft, stirring with the flat-ended wooden spoon every minute or so. Test for the setting point by spooning a little onto your chilled plate. After 1-2 mins, push your finger through the jam – if the surface wrinkles it is ready, if not, keep cooking for 2 minute intervals, testing in between.
  7. Once the jam is ready, let it cool for about 10 mins before ladling into your warm sterilised jars and sealing with the clean, dry lids.
  8. Label with the name and date when cool. Will keep for at least 12 months in a cool, dark place.

Notes: What does to sterilise mean? What is the setting point?

Categories: Kitchen Garden, Recipe | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Cornersmith’s pickled beetroot

We pickled our own beetroot last week for the HalloweenFete… As long as your jars & lids are scrupulously clean and sterilised, the beautiful jars should last for ages! Not that our fete jars did however…

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: beetroot
Recipe source: Alex and Jamie at Cornersmith Café, Marrickville

Equipment:

  • Chopping boards and knives
  • Potato peelers
  • Food processor with vegetable blade attachment
  • Paper towel
  • Oven mitts
  • Large saucepan & wide pan
  • Tongs
  • Scales
  • Wooden spoon
  • Measures – cup, 1/4 cup, tablespoon
  • Glass jug for pouring
  • Jars and lids
  • Labels
Ingredients:

  • 3kg+ medium size beetroot
  • 1 litre white wine vinegar
  • 1 litre water
  • 1¾ cups raw sugar
  • ¼ cup salt
  • 2 tablespoons peppercorns
  • 2 tablespoons dried dill

 What to do:

  • Preheat the oven to 140C.
  • Wash the beets.  Trim off the leaves for another use.  Weigh the beetroot – you’ll need about 3kg. Peel the beets and add peels to compost.
  • Very thinly slice the beets using the blade attachment on the food processor.  (You could also use a large knife or a mandolin.)
  • Wash the jars and lids in hot soapy water, rinse well and drain upside down.
  • Place all the jars onto an oven tray, right side up, and slide into the oven to sterilize for 15 mins.
  • Dry lids with a clean piece of paper towel.
  • In a saucepan put vinegar, salt, water, sugar, peppercorns and dill. Gently heat until sugar is dissolved and then slowly bring to the boil.
  • Slide the tray of jars out of the oven and then carefully using tongs& an oven mitt, pack the sliced beets in.
  • Ladle the hot syrup into a glass jug and then pour over to cover beetroots. Leave a 5mm space at the top.
  • Seal immediately and leave to cool. Label when cool.
  • Leave to mature for at least a week.  The jars should be kept in a cool, dark place and will last at least 6 months if not a year!
  • Refrigerate after opening and eat within a month.

Notes:What other vegetables could we pickle? What other preserves could we make? Why do we sterilize the jars?

ourkitchengarden.net

Categories: Kitchen Garden, Recipe | Tags: , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

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