Posts Tagged With: pasta

Spinach and ricotta cannelloni

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We often make our own pasta here at school, but sometimes it’s easier to buy ready-made dried pasta – especially when you can stuff the round tubes  with yummy fillings!

Fresh from the garden: spinach, basil, garlic
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 4 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

·       Large mixing bowl

·       Chopping boards & knives

·       Grater & microplane grater

·       Large frying pan

·       Slotted spoon

·       Scales

·       Measures: tablespoon

·       Teaspoons

·       4 small baking dishes

·       2 baking trays

·       Serving plates

·       Paper towel

Ingredients:

·       1 bunch spinach

·       3 cloves garlic

·       1 nutmeg

·       1 tablespoon olive oil plus extra

·       20g butter

·       400g ricotta – homemade if possible!

·       25g parmesan or grana padano

·       200g mozzarella

·       700ml tomato sauce or passata

·       Flaked salt and pepper

·       16 cannelloni tubes

What to do:

  1. Please start all the initial elements ASAP as the dish will need to bake for 35 minutes!
  2. Preheat oven to 200C.
  3. Wash the spinach in a large bowl of water, changing several times and checking to make sure all leaves and stems are clean. Shake dry over the sink and then finely chop.
  4. Peel the garlic and finely chop. Using the microplane, grate about half the nutmeg.
  5. In a large frying pan heat oil and butter, add garlic and fry gently for one minute then add grated nutmeg, spinach and a pinch or two of salt and cook for a few minutes. Use the slotted spoon to scoop into a clean bowl and leave to cool.
  6. Using the scales, weigh the parmesan and then grate it. Then weigh the ricotta.
  7. Once spinach is cool add ricotta, parmesan and season with salt and pepper. Mix well.
  8. Using teaspoons or the end of a table knife, fill the cannelloni tubes with the spinach and ricotta mixture.
  9. Weigh the mozzarella and grate it on the widest setting.
  10. Spoon half of the tomato sauce into the baking dishes, then lay four filled cannelloni in each, then spoon over the rest of the tomato sauce.
  11. Season with salt and pepper and drizzle with olive oil, then sprinkle over the parmesan and mozzarella.
  12. Lay the dishes on to baking trays, then bake for about 35 minutes or until bubbling.
  13. Line your serving plates with a piece of folded paper towel.
  14. Carefully remove from the oven with oven gloves, place each on its own lined plate. You may want to slice each cannelloni tube in two to serve.

 Notes: What other baked pasta dishes do you know?

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Beetroot ravioli with goats cheese and mint

The pasta dough will need to rest for about an hour, so each class makes for the next, so gets straight down to rolling for the ravioli!

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Fresh from the garden: chives, mint
Recipe source: adapted from a recipe by Martha Stewart
Makes: 48 small ravioli

Equipment:

·       Pasta machines

·       A selection of mixing bowls

·       Salad spinner, paper towel

·       Chopping board & knife

·       Large metal spoon, teaspoons

·       Crinkly or pizza cutter

·       Pastry brush

·       2 baking trays

·       A large stockpot & small saucepan

·       Slotted spoon

·       Colander

·       Serving bowls

Ingredients:

·       1 quantity 500g beetroot pasta (complete first 8 points then continue with this recipe)

·       200g ricotta

·       150g goats cheese at room temperature

·       10 chives

·       2 sprigs mint

·       Semolina flour or fine polenta, for dusting

·       Cooking salt

·       Flaked salt & black pepper

·       Extra-virgin olive oil

·       50g salted butter

What to do:

  1. Fill the stockpot with water and set to heat to a rolling boil.

To make the filling:

  1. Wash and pat dry the mint and chives. Weigh the cheeses out. Saving one mint sprig for garnish, finely chop the leaves from the other to yield about 2 tablespoons worth. Snip the chives into tiny pieces & stir the herbs together with cheeses. Season with salt and pepper.

To make the ravioli:

  1. Dust a baking sheet and your work surface with the semolina flour. Working with each sheet of dough just after it’s been rolled, lay the sheet down on your dusted surface.
  2. Space tablespoons of filling about 10cm apart along just about a quarter in of the strip. Fold the top half over, and then gently press around filling to seal, working from centre out.
  3. Using a cutter, cut between each ravioli to separate. Transfer ravioli to sheet, and cover with a clean tea towel. Repeat with remaining pasta dough and filling.
  4. Add 2 tablespoons of salt to the boiling water in the stockpot and half of the ravioli. Cook, stirring once or twice to separate, for about 4 minutes until edges are just tender.
  5. Using a slotted spoon, transfer to a colander to drain. Drizzle with oil, and toss gently to coat. Transfer to a bowl, and loosely cover to keep warm. Repeat with remaining ravioli.
  6. Meanwhile, once all the ravioli is almost cooked, melt the butter in the small saucepan over medium heat. Cook until butter is golden brown and has a nutty aroma for about 4 minutes.
  7. Divide ravioli among plates (if first batch has cooled, return them to hot water for 15 seconds, then drain). Spoon browned butter over ravioli. Serve immediately garnished with the mint.

Notes: To freeze ravioli, place in a single layer on baking sheets in the freezer for about 15 minutes, and then pack in airtight container. Freeze for up to 1 month. Do not thaw before cooking.

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Penne pesto

For a spicy alternative, rocket leaves can be added to the basil and pounded together or you could try a parsley combination… cooked chickpeas can be used in place of pine nuts in case of nut allergy, and gluten free pasta works fantastically!

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Fresh from the garden: basil, garlic
Recipe source: pesto adapted from a recipe by Alice Waters in The Art of Simple Food
Serves: 4 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Large saucepan or stockpot
  • Mixing bowls – 4 mixed sizes
  • Scales
  • Salad spinner
  • Cheese grater
  • Medium frying pan
  • Mortar & pestle
  • Tea towel
  • Measuring jug
  • Spatula
  • Tablespoon
  • Serving bowls
Ingredients:

  • 250g dried penne
  • 1 big bunch basil, to yield about 100g
  • 1 large clove garlic
  • Salt
  • 80g pine nuts
  • 50g parmesan cheese – grana padano or parmigiano
  • 200ml extra virgin olive oil

 

What to do:

  • Fill the large saucepan or stockpot with water and set it to boil.
  • Weigh the pasta and add it to the pot when boiling with a tablespoon of salt – cook for 10 minutes.
  • Meanwhile, pick the basil leaves from the stalks and weigh before you wash them! Then wash in several changes of water and thoroughly spin-dry the basil.
  • Heat the frying pan on a medium heat and lightly dry-toast the pine nuts, shaking regularly so that they don’t stick.
  • Peel the garlic clove and place in the mortar and pestle with a good pinch of salt. Pound these to a paste.
  • Grate the parmesan cheese.
  • Add the pine nuts to the mortar & pestle and continue to pound. Once smooth-ish, transfer to the bowl and stir in the parmesan.
  • Tear the basil leaves and put them into the mortar with a sprinkle of flaked salt. Pound the leaves to a paste. Return the pine nut mixture to the mortar and, pounding it all together, gradually pour in all the olive oil.
  • Taste for seasoning and adjust if necessary, then using the spatula, scrape out the pesto into a clean big mixing bowl.
  • When the pasta is cooked, scoop out into the pesto bowl with a small amount of cooking water to moisten. Divide among bowls and serve!

Notes: With what else can you use pesto? What also goes with well with basil? Why do we toast the pine nuts? Can you name any other pasta sauces?

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Sean’s linguine with shredded rocket, lemon, chilli and parmesan

This dish has been a staple on Sean’s menu since he opened in 1993, and continues to be one of the most popular dishes… a simple dish; great produce being the most important thing!

From the garden: rocket, lemon, chillies, garlic
Recipe source: adapted from the recipe by Sean Moran at Sean’s Panaroma in ‘Let It Simmer’
Serves: 6 at home or 24 tastes

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Equipment:

  • Large stockpot
  • 2 large bowls
  • Chopping board
  • Grater, citrus juicer
  • Measuring jug, tablespoon
  • Scales
  • Tongs
  • Serving bowls

 

Ingredients:

  • 500g linguine
  • 5 generous handfuls rocket
  • 100g parmesan (preferably Parmigiano or grana padano)
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 1 lemon
  • 1 tablespoon chilli oil (see separate recipe)
  • 100ml extra-virgin olive oil
  • Salt & freshly ground pepper

What to do:

  • Three-quarters fill the large stockpot with cold water and bring to the boil.
  • Wash and spin dry and then coarsely shred the rocket into ribbons with a sharp knife.
  • Weigh to measure then coarsely grate the parmesan.
  • Squeeze and strain the juice from the lemon, then squeeze the garlic through the press and combine with lemon juice, chilli oil and olive oil in a bowl large enough to toss the linguine (you may need 2 bowls, so then divide the mixture between them).
  • Throw a handful of salt into the boiling water and let it return to the boil. Cook pasta until al dente – fresh pasta should take about one minute – then lift it into the prepared bowl with tongs, draining it as you go yet taking a slight drizzle of the cooking water with the pasta (this will lubricate and combine dressing).
  • Add the shredded rocket and parmesan, then season and toss together just before serving.
  • Divide into your serving bowls and eat immediately!

Notes: What is rocket also known as? What does to shred mean? What does al dente mean?

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Handmade orecchiette

Orecchiette resemble little ears, which is where they get their name, and is the traditional pasta of Puglia. A perfect orecchietta is just under 2cm across and has a slightly domed shaped which enables it to hold pasta sauce well.

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Recipe source: adapted from a recipe by Lara Scala Quinn on marthstewart.com
Serves: 4 starter serves or enough tastes for 20

Equipment:

  • Large stockpot with lid
  • Measures: cup, ½ cup, ¼ cup, tablespoon
  • Chopping board and knife
  • Baking sheet
  • Tea towel
  • Large bowl
  • Serving bowls
Ingredients:

  • 1 cup semolina flour, plus more for baking sheet
  • 1/2 cup plain flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon coarse salt
  • 1/2 cup water, plus more if needed

What to do:

  • Fill the large pot with water and set to boil with the lid on.
  • Measure semolina, plain flour and salt into a large bowl.
  • Using your fingers, swirl ingredients together until combined then create a well in centre. Pour 1/4 cup water into well and gradually incorporate flour mixture into water using your fingers.
  • Once all the water is absorbed, continue adding water, 1 tablespoon at a time, until mixture begins to form a dough.
  • Turn out onto a large, clean work surface and start to gather and knead dough, working it until no dry flour remains on work surface.
  • Continue to knead until smooth and elastic, about 5 minutes.
  • Divide dough into 8 equal portions, and cover them with a clean, damp kitchen towel.
  • Roll 1 portion of dough into a 45-cm-long rope.
  • Use a knife to cut and drag a 1cm piece of dough from end of rope facing you — a grainy wooden cutting board helps grip the dough.
  • Holding knife at a 45-degree angle to work surface, press and roll dough toward you.
  • Unfurl each piece of dough over your thumb in the opposite direction to form a concave shape, and transfer to a baking sheet lightly sprinkled with semolina flour. Repeat with remaining dough.
  • When the pot of water is boiling add the orecchiette and a tablespoon of salt, stir and replace the lid. Cook for 2 or 3 minutes until the pasta bob to the top.
  • Using a slotted spoon, scoop out into a big bowl with a little of the cooking water and then toss in a tablespoon of olive oil before adding your sauce.
  • Orecchiette can be stored at room temperature in a single layer overnight: cover with a clean kitchen towel or plastic wrap. Any extra orecchiette can be frozen up to six weeks: First, freeze them in a single layer on a baking sheet, then transfer them to a resealable plastic bag and return them to the freezer. Boil directly from the freezer.

Notes: What does orecchiette mean? Name some other pasta shapes. What do they mean?

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Beetroot pasta

This is the basic recipe for the pasta dough mixture as well as instructions on how to use a pasta machine.

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 Serves: 6 at home or 12 substantial tastes

Equipment:

  • Scales
  • Bowls
  • Pasta machines
  • Plastic wrap
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Pastry brush
  • Poles and somewhere to rest them
Ingredients:

  • 500g typo ‘00’ plain flour
  • 4 free-range eggs
  • 70g pureed beetroot

What to do:

To make the pasta:

  • Place the large bowl on the scales, reset to zero then measure the flour in to it. Add the beetroot.
  • Crack the eggs carefully into the small bowl, discarding any shell, then add them to the flour. Mix thoroughly with the wooden spoon, then tip the dough onto a clean, dry workbench.
  • Knead the dough for a few minutes, then wrap it in plastic film and let it rest for 1 hour at room temperature.

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  • Fix the pasta machine to a suitable bench or table – if the surface is not thick enough you may need to place a thick book under the machine. Screw the clamp very tightly.
  • Clear a large space on the workbench alongside the pasta machine. All surfaces must be clean and dry. Press or roll the dough into a rectangle about 8 cm wide.
  • Set the rollers on the pasta machine to the widest setting and pass the dough through. The dough will probably look quite ragged at this stage. Fold it in 3, turn it 90 degrees and roll it through again. Go to the next-thickest setting and pass the dough through 3-4 times.
  • Continue in this manner (changing the settings and passing the dough through) until the dough has passed through the second thinnest setting. Don’t use the very thinnest setting, as the dough gets too fine and is hard to manage. If the dough gets too long to handle comfortably, cut it into 2-3 pieces using the large knife, and roll each piece separately.
  • Lay the pasta strips on a lightly floured surface & dust with a little more flour.
  • Attach the pasta cutter to the machine and pass through the largest rollers for linguine or the thinnest rollers for angelhair pasta, draping it in your hands to catch.
  • Carefully separate each strip and hang over a pole to dry.
  • Clean the pasta machine by brushing it with a dry, wide pastry brush & putting back in its box.

To cook the pasta:

  • When the stockpot has started a fast boil, gather your drying pasta on a large baking tray. Add a tablespoon of cooking salt and then the pasta to the pot, stir once and quickly put the lid back on.
  • As soon as the pot begins to boil again, take the lid off. The pasta should only take 1 or 2 minutes to cook from boiling. Taste to check – it’s important that the pasta remains al dente and is not overcooked!

Notes: Never wash the pasta machine – it will rust! Just brush down with a strong brush to remove the leftover dough.

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Kitchen News – 24th October 2013

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Week 3 already and it’s hot, humid and very smoky… scary to think what the rest of these warm seasons’ weather holds in store? While the mountains burn, the garden here bursts with produce… For a while there I thought that this term would be quieter than the last’s multitude of activities and extravaganzas but I’ve been deluding myself!

We have been welcoming the Year 2 students into the Kitchen Garden program these last weeks, so they’ve been boning up on all the safety issues related to working in a busy kitchen, and also demonstrating knife skills (and Bear Paw: RAAAARRRR!) with flair and precision. Next lesson will include the formal ceremony of Presentation of the Knife Licences…! The children also got a taste of kitchen lessons to come and managed to whip up some snacky antipasto snacks too while they were at it, (clever little cooks that they are already!) so we feasted on Bruschetta with smashed broad beans and garlic; Danish feta with lemon and thyme; Roasted capsicum and garlic cloves with herbs; A simple salad with edible flowers; and rolled out some crispy Rosemary and thyme grissini. Tutto bene!

The biggest news is that we have a new Garden Specialist! Allison has jumped into the role with gusto, and has already started lessons with the children. (Thanks to Emma for all your support this week!) Please drop in to the garden and say hi if you have a moment – and PLEASE consider volunteering for one of our 10 weekly lessons if you have an hour or so to spare! Or even put your hand up for a bit of Stink Bug extermination?!

On the menu this week: the gorgeous-hued Beetroot linguine with landcress, lemon and aromatic herbs; a super-delicious Green lentil and spinach soup; the most fabulous crunchy and spicy Eurasian slaw; and also hand-rolled out some Rosemary and thyme grissini to dip into Yotam’s hummus. Veg-heavy and wonderful – and very little scraps left for the chooks!

For loads of great photos from the week and recipes updated fortnightly, check back here!

Cheers all x

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Beetroot linguine with land cress, lemon and garden herbs

Our Kitchen Garden students love making pasta – and this recipe sings of spring! It includes the dough mixture as well as instructions on how to use a pasta machine.

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Fresh from the garden: eggs, beetroot, land cress, lemon, marjoram, parsley, coriander
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 8 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Salad spinner
  • Pasta machine
  • Scales, garlic press
  • Scissors
  • Plastic wrap
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Pastry brush, grater
  • Large stock pot
  • Tongs, large & small bowls
  • Serving bowls
Ingredients:

  • 500g typo ‘00’ plain flour
  • 4 free-range eggs
  • 70g pureed beetroot
  • A large handful of land cress (or watercress)
  • A handful of freshly picked herbs
  • 1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • A lemon
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • Flaked salt & black pepper
  • 30g parmesan

What to do:

To make the pasta:

  • Place the large bowl on the scales, reset to zero then measure the flour in to it. Add the beetroot.
  • Crack the eggs carefully into the small bowl, discarding any shell, then add them to the flour. Mix thoroughly with the wooden spoon, then tip the dough onto a clean, dry workbench.
  • Knead the dough for a few minutes, then wrap it in plastic film and let it rest for 1 hour at room temperature.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________

  • Fill the large stockpot and the saucepan with water and set to boil on high with the lids on.
  • Fix the pasta machine to a suitable bench or table – if the surface is not thick enough you may need to place a thick book under the machine. Screw the clamp very tightly.
  • Clear a large space on the workbench alongside the pasta machine. All surfaces must be clean and dry. Press or roll the dough into a rectangle about 8 cm wide.
  • Set the rollers on the pasta machine to the widest setting and pass the dough through. The dough will probably look quite ragged at this stage. Fold it in 3, turn it 90 degrees and roll it through again. Go to the next-thickest setting and pass the dough through 3-4 times.
  • Continue in this manner (changing the settings and passing the dough through) until the dough has passed through the second thinnest setting. Don’t use the very thinnest setting, as the dough gets too fine and is hard to manage. If the dough gets too long to handle comfortably, cut it into 2-3 pieces using the large knife, and roll each piece separately.
  • Lay the pasta strips on a lightly floured surface & dust with a little more flour. Attach the pasta cutter to the machine and pass through the largest rollers, draping it in your hands to catch.
  • Carefully separate each strip and hang over a pole to dry.
  • Clean the pasta machine by brushing it with a dry, wide pastry brush& putting back in its box.  

To finish the dish:

  • Check that the stockpot has been filled with water and is set on high to boil.
  • Wash the land cress in several changes of water and spin dry. Using the scissors, snip the leaves into thin strips and reserve in a big bowl.
  • Wash and dry the lemon and zest it. Cut the lemon in half and squeeze its juice into the big bowl too.
  • Peel the garlic cloves and squeeze them through the garlic press into the bowl too.
  • Wash and spin dry the herbs and strip their leaves, then add them into the rocket bowl.
  • Measure 1/3 cup of olive oil into the bowl and sprinkle on a few pinches of flaked salt and toss to incorporate.
  • Measure the parmesan and grate what you need and keep separate.
  • When the stockpot has started a fast boil, gather your drying pasta on a large baking tray. Add a tablespoon of cooking salt and then the pasta to the pot, stir once and quickly put the lid back on.
  • As soon as the pot begins to boil again, take the lid off. The pasta should only take 1 or 2 minutes to cook from boiling. Taste to check – it’s important that the pasta remains al dente and is not overcooked!
  • Using tongs, carefully pull the pasta (and some of its cooking liquid) out and into the big lemony bowl, sprinkle the parmesan on and toss thoroughly to incorporate.
  • Divide into serving bowls, sprinkle the remaining parmesan on and eat immediately!

Notes: Never wash the pasta machine – it will rust! Just brush down with a strong brush to remove the leftover dough.

ourkitchengarden.net

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Spelt pasta

Our Kitchen Garden students love making pasta! This recipe uses spelt flour, an ancient grain that is slightly nutty. Spelt has a lower gluten content than wheat flour, and whilst not suitable for a coeliac diet, can be eaten by those with a low threshold gluten intolerance.

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Spelt linguine with quick pesto

Fresh from the garden: eggs
Recipe source: adapted from a recipe by Sean Moran at Sean’s Panaroma
Makes: about 600g pasta, enough for 6, or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Scales
  • Stand mixer, bowl & paddle
  • Pasta machines
  • Measures – tablespoon
  • Plastic film
  • Large knife
  • Pastry brush
Ingredients:

  • 570g spelt flour plus extra
  • 4 free-range eggs
  • 15ml water

 What to do:

  • Weigh the flour into the bowl of the mixer, then with the motor running, add the eggs one at a time. Process for a few minutes until the dough clings together and feels quite springy.
  • Tip the dough onto a clean, dry workbench. Knead the dough for a few minutes, then wrap it in plastic film and let it rest for about an hour at room temperature.

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  • Get an adult to help fix the pasta machine to a suitable bench. Screw the clamp very tightly.
  • Set up your pasta hanging poles, ideally between 2 chairs.
  • Clear a large space on the workbench alongside the pasta machine. All surfaces must be clean and dry. Press the dough into a rectangle about 8 cm wide.
  • Set the rollers on the pasta machine to the widest setting and pass the dough through. The dough will probably look quite ragged at this stage. Fold it in 3, turn it 90 degrees and roll it through again. Go to the next-thickest setting and pass the dough through 3-4 times.
  • Continue in this manner (changing the settings and passing the dough through) until the dough has passed through the second thinnest setting. Don’t use the very thinnest setting, as the dough gets too fine and is hard to manage. If the dough gets too long to handle comfortably, cut it into 2-3 pieces using the large knife, and roll each piece separately.
  • Depending on which type of pasta you want, you can either lay the strips out on a lightly-floured table and cut them by hand, or you can fix the cutter attachment to the machine and carefully roll the pasta strips into strips for linguine or the thinner cutters for angel hair, gently catching them as they come through.
  • Drape the pasta over the hanging poles to dry while you make your sauce.
  • Clean the pasta machine parts by brushing them down with a dry pastry brush, pop the collected parts back into their boxes, and then clear and clean the table.

Notes: Never wash the pasta machine – it will rust! Just brush down with a strong pastry brush to remove the leftover dough.

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Busy hands!

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Linguine with broad beans, lemon and garden herbs

Our Kitchen Garden students love making pasta – and this recipe sings of spring! It includes the dough mixture as well as instructions on how to use a pasta machine.

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: eggs, rocket, broad beans, lemon, marjoram, parsley, coriander, thyme
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 6 at home or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Salad spinner
  • Pasta machine
  • Scales, garlic press
  • Measures – teaspoon
  • Food processor
  • Plastic wrap
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Pastry brush, grater
  • Large stock pot & saucepan
  • Tongs, large & small bowls
  • Serving bowls
Ingredients:

  • 500g plain flour
  • 5 free-range eggs
  • Salt
  • 1kg broad beans in pod
  • A large handful of herbs
  • 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • A lemon
  • 4 garlic cloves
  • Flaked salt & black pepper
  • 50g parmesan

What to do:

To make the pasta:

  • Weigh the flour, then combine it with a teaspoon of salt in the large bowl.
  • Crack the eggs carefully into the small bowl, discarding any shell, then add them to the flour. Mix thoroughly, then tip the dough onto a clean, dry workbench.
  • Knead the dough for a few minutes, then wrap it in plastic film and let it rest for 1 hour at room temperature.

_________________________________________________________________

  • Fill the large stockpot and the saucepan with water and set to boil on high with the lids on.
  • Fix the pasta machine to a suitable bench or table – if the surface is not thick enough you may need to place a thick book under the machine. Screw the clamp very tightly.
  • Clear a large space on the workbench alongside the pasta machine. All surfaces must be clean and dry. Press or roll the dough into a rectangle about 8 cm wide.
  • Set the rollers on the pasta machine to the widest setting and pass the dough through. The dough will probably look quite ragged at this stage. Fold it in 3, turn it 90 degrees and roll it through again. Go to the next-thickest setting and pass the dough through 3-4 times.
  • Continue in this manner (changing the settings and passing the dough through) until the dough has passed through the second thinnest setting. Don’t use the very thinnest setting, as the dough gets too fine and is hard to manage. If the dough gets too long to handle comfortably, cut it into 2-3 pieces using the large knife, and roll each piece separately.
  • Lay the pasta strips on a lightly floured surface & dust with a little more flour. Attach the pasta cutter to the machine and pass through the largest rollers, draping it in your hands to catch.
  • Carefully separate each strip and hang over a pole to dry.
  • Clean the pasta machine by brushing it with a dry, wide pastry brush & putting back in its box.  

To finish the dish:

  • Check that the stockpot & saucepan have been filled with water and are set on high to boil.
  • Pod the broad beans, discarding the outer shell into the compost and add beans to the boiling water. Fill a large bowl with cold water and have ready.
  • Boil the broad beans for 3 minutes, drain and then immediately refresh in the bowl of cold water. Drain again and double-pod by slipping the outer shell off into the compost. Put the beans into the big bowl.
  • Wash and dry the lemon and zest it. Cut the lemon in half and squeeze its juice into the big bowl too.
  • Peel the garlic cloves and squeeze them through the garlic press into the bowl too.
  • Measure the parmesan and grate what you need. Wash and spin dry the herbs and strip their leaves, chopping with the mezzaluna, then add them into the garlicky broad bean bowl.
  • Measure 1/3 cup of olive oil into the bowl and sprinkle on a few pinches of flaked salt and toss to incorporate.
  • When the stockpot has started a fast boil, gather your drying pasta on a large baking tray. Add  a tablespoon of cooking salt and then the pasta to the pot, stir once and quickly put the lid back on.
  • As soon as the pot begins to boil again, take the lid off. The pasta should only take 1 or 2 minutes to cook from boiling. Taste to check – it’s important that the pasta remains al dente and is not overcooked!
  • Using tongs, carefully pull the pasta (and some of its cooking liquid) out and into the big lemony bowl, sprinkle half the parmesan on and toss thoroughly to incorporate.
  • Divide into serving bowls, sprinkle the remaining parmesan on and eat immediately!

Notes: Never wash the pasta machine – it will rust! Just brush down with a strong brush to remove the leftover dough.

 

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