Posts Tagged With: vegetables

Red lentil fritters with green yoghurt

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These little morsels may be on the diminutive side, but they punch well above their weight in the flavour stakes. If you wanted to make them gluten-free, you could substitute the flour with teff flour or GF self-raising flour – you may need to add a little more to make the required consistency.

Fresh from the garden: lemon, onion, coriander, parsley, garlic, chilli
Recipe source: adapted from a recipe on gourmetraveller.com.au
Serves: 6 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Frying pan
  • Measures: jug, cup, tablespoon, teaspoon, ½ teaspoon
  • Mortar and pestle
  • Chopping boards and knives
  • Large saucepan and lid
  • Mixing bowls – large, medium, small
  • Microplane zester
  • Citrus juicer
  • Salad spinner
  • Tongs
  • Scales
  • Mini chopper processor
  • Whisk
  • Serving plates and little bowls
Ingredients:

·       ½ onion

·       2 garlic cloves

·       2 teaspoons coriander seeds

·       2 teaspoons cumin seeds

·       2 tablespoons olive oil

·       200g (1 cup) red lentils

·       2 eggs

·       100g self-raising flour

·       2 lemons

·       Rice Bran oil, for shallow-frying

Green yoghurt

·       Small bunch coriander

·       Small bunch flat-leaf parsley

·       1 garlic clove

·       ¼ long green chilli

·       ½ teaspoon ground cumin

·       ¼ teaspoon ground cardamom

·       1 tablespoon olive oil

·       100g Greek yoghurt

What to do:

For the lentil fritters:

  1. Measure the spices into the frying pan and heat, gently toasting for a few minutes. Remove from the heat and leave to cool, then coarsely grind with the mortar and pestle.
  2. Peel and finely chop the onion and 2 cloves of garlic.
  3. Heat the 2 tablespoons of olive oil in the saucepan over medium-high heat, add onion and garlic and sauté until tender for about 5 minutes.
  4. Stir in spices and fry until fragrant for 30 seconds, then add lentils and 650ml water, bring to a simmer, cover and cook until lentils are tender and liquid is absorbed for about 10 minutes. Transfer to a bowl to cool.

 For the green yoghurt:

  1. Wash the lemon and zest only the thin layer of yellow rind, reserving for the lentil mixture, then juice both halves.
  2. Wash the herbs and spin dry. Add just the leaves from the parsley and all the coriander to the small mini-chopper.
  3. Peel the remaining clove of garlic and add to the mini chopper.
  4. Slice the chilli in half (using gloves if you wish). Remove the seeds, discarding into compost, and slice chilli into small bits, adding to the mini chopper.
  5. Finally add the spices to the mini chopper, olive oil and lemon juice and process to a fine purée. Transfer to a bowl, season to taste, swirl in yoghurt and divide into serving bowls.

To finish the lentils:

  1. Separate the eggs, carefully, so that the yolks remain intact and the whites are clean.
  2. Stir egg yolks into lentils, then stir in flour and lemon rind and season generously to taste. Whisk egg whites and a pinch of salt in a separate clean and dry bowl to firm peaks and fold into lentil mixture.
  3. Preheat oven to 180C and heat 3cm oil in the frying pan over medium-high heat. When hot, add heaped tablespoonfuls of lentil mixture in batches and cook, turning occasionally, until golden brown for about 2-3 minutes.
  4. Drain on paper towels, then slice in half if needed. Cut remaining lemon into quarters to serve.
  5. Divide onto serving plates, pop bowls of yoghurt and lemon wedges on and take to the table.

Notes: Why do we need to use gloves when preparing chillies? How can you tell when the oil is hot enough to fry?

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Zucchini, mint and feta salad with crunchy pangrattato

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If you have a spiraliser then this dish is easy and looks fantastic! If not, then julienne your zucchini by slicing or peeling them into as thin strips as possible.

Fresh from the garden: zucchini, mint, lemon, sage, mint
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 6 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

·     Food processor

·     Measures – cup, ½ cup, tablespoon, teaspoon

·     Microplane zester

·     Paper towel

·     Large frying pan

·     Spiraliser

·     Scissors

·     Citrus juicer

·     Serving bowls and smaller bowls for pangrattato

 

 

 

 

Ingredients:

For the pangrattato:

·     1/2 teaspoon fennel seeds

·     1/2 teaspoon chilli flakes

·     2 tablespoons olive oil

·     Half a small loaf of sourdough bread

·     1/2 cup pepitas (pumpkin seeds)

·     1 lemon

·     3 sage leaves

For the salad:

·     3 zucchini

·     A small branch of mint leaves

·     3 tablespoons olive oil

·     100g Danish feta

·     Flaked salt

What to do:

For pangrattato:

  1. Break or tear the sourdough into small chunks and then blend up in the food processor until they resemble breadcrumbs. You’ll need about a heaped cup.
  2. Wash and wipe the lemon dry, then zest the lemon, taking only the thin layer of skin off and leaving the white pith on. Wash the sage leaves and gently press dry with a piece of paper towel. With scissors, snip into thin strips.
  3. Heat the 2 tablespoons of olive oil in the frying pan. Add the rest of the pangrattato ingredients and toss until golden and crunchy (this takes about 5 minutes). Taste and add more seasoning if needed. Set aside to cool and crisp up.

For zucchini salad:

  1. Wash the zucchini and wipe dry, then spiralise or julienne them into thin strips. Wash the mint, press dry with a piece of paper towel and using the scissors, snip them into thin strips. You should have about 2 tablespoons worth.
  2. Cut the zested lemon in half and juice one half.

To finish:

  1. Place zucchini in a dish, top with mint leaves, oil and the lemon juice and season with a grind of pepper. Check the seasoning and add a sprinkle of salt if needed. Weigh the feta and crumble what you need into the zucchini. Toss to combine and divide out into your serving bowls.
  2. To serve, top salad with a little of the pangrattato and serve the rest in little bowls on the side for each person to help themselves to, just before eating.

Notes: What does a heaped cup mean? How does a spiraliser work? What is pangrattato?

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Kitchen news 22nd June 2016

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(This article originally appeared in the School Newsletter on 24th June.)

We’ve had an all-star cast of helpers these last few weeks – some of my original Kitchen Garden kids from 2011 have been in to assist the classes in the Cottage! It’s been great to see how beautifully they instruct the younger children and how far their cooking skills have come along after all these years. Taye, Mimi and Chandy (and their friend Elvenie) have taken care of quite a few groups over many lessons and we really appreciate it! And of course the food has been even more delicious than usual…

They have been helping some of the groups prepare the freshly picked cos lettuces, tossing them into a classic Caesar salad with anchovy and garlic-drenched crunchy baked croutons, and perfectly poached eggs plopped on top of it all.

Pumpkins are plentiful at this time of year – and really cheap at the shops: I saw some for 80c a kilo! So the big girls and the children have been carefully preparing chunks to add to sautéing leeks, thyme, ground cumin and coriander and then blending up into the Best pumpkin soup ever!

Mish and the garden crew have been harvesting carrots – and what crazy carrots they are! In class we’ve been laughing at the three-legged creatures, ugly as all get-out, and some looking like they desperately need to go to the loo! But of course they’re as delicious as can be, in Roasted winter veggies with rosemary and honey drizzle and crispy fennel bits, cauliflower florets and potato chunks.

We’ve also been experimenting with a different sort of bread too: Indian Garlic naan dough made with yoghurt and egg, baked briefly in the oven and then brushed with the garlic. Different from the usual magic dough we use, and fabulous served with Kerry’s tasty daal that some of the Broad Bean groups have made, with red lentils, mustard seeds and cumin, coconut milk, onion and capsicum. Creamily good indeed!

Next week we have the Year 1 kidlets coming to visit. Brace! Brace! Brace! Only joking – it will be lovely to see their little grobbley faces again – I’ve missed them since they moved up away from the kindy playground!

And then the week after that, holidays. A chance to recalibrate, fire up the oven and chill out a bit. Hopefully! And also Carolyn, Mish and I are running a school Kitchen Garden holiday program 13th to 15th July in the Cottage – check back for more details!

Keep safe! Mx

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Kitchen news 7th June

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So finally we’re getting the cold weather we’ve been wondering about all autumn… all the wintry effects in one weekend even! One day we’re swimming down at the beach and only a week later we’re battening down the hatches against the #stormageddon! I do love the change of season (for about a week anyway) when the big casserole pot gets brought out for repeat usage on the stove and my pink fluffy slippers are unearthed from the back of the wardrobe.

Luckily in the cottage we had pre-empted the change to cool and had written up some delicious and warming dishes for the menu… Kale and potato soup with poached eggs for example: instead of sautéing off the onion and then sweating in the potato with garlic and other soupy mirepoix bits, in effect layering the flavours, we bung everything in at once, more or less, cook it up and then plop the eggs in to poach in the actual soup itself! The ingredients by themselves nothing to write home about necessarily, but together make up the most tasty and soul-warming combo… and I’ve even had a few parents stop me in the playground to say they had made it at home over the storms.

Moroccan chickpea hotpot has made a comeback too, all the lovely cinnamon, smoked paprika and cumin flavours mingling away in one chunky broth and then finished with my favourite herb of all: fresh coriander. Some kids are yet to fully grasp a love of chickpeas (my own included) but I’m giving it all I’ve got and won’t stop at yuck!

Pizza is back on the menu, this time as a tomato-less pizza bianca, with spinach, roasted garlic and ricotta and it has been going down a treat. Of course it would, it’s pizza!

And we’ve even managed a salad: A warm salad of bok choy, roasted eggplant, goats cheese and the last of the little baby bush tomatoes. The flavours sing with a basil-infused basting sauce, and a little sweet aged balsamic drizzle to finish.

A few groups finished off the current crop of rhubarb to bottle a gorgeous jam with vanilla bean to sell later in the year at Grandparents Day on Friday 16th September and at the Kitchen Garden stall at the Halloween Fete on Sunday 30th October… my store cupboards are looking very healthy already with stocks of bouillon, marinated olives, mandarine marmalade and the rhubarb and vanilla jam all ready to be labelled! So save your pennies for those…

Have a good week and stay warm!

Melissa

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Pistou soup

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French pistou sauce is like Italian pesto except has no pinenuts, and is a classic accompaniment to this rich veggie soup.

Fresh from the garden: potatoes, carrots, celery, zucchini, beans, basil, onion, garlic, bay
Recipe source: adapted from a recipe on jamieoliver.com
Serves: 6 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Chopping boards and knives
  • Mixing bowls – 2 lge, 3 med
  • Colander
  • Medium stockpot
  • Measures – litre jug, ½ cup
  • Scales
  • Mortar and pestle
  • Serving bowls

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ingredients:

  • 1 onion
  • 3 cloves of garlic
  • 2 leeks
  • 3 potatoes
  • 3 carrots
  • 1 stick of celery
  • 3 zucchini
  • A small handful green beans
  • 2 sprigs of fresh flat-leaf parsley
  • 2 fresh bay leaves
  • Olive oil
  • 1 x 400g tin chopped tomatoes
  • 1 x 400g tin cannellini beans
  • 1 x 400g tin borlotti beans
  • ½ cup small macaroni

Pistou sauce:

  • 5 cloves of garlic
  • 6 sprigs of fresh basil
  • 60g parmesan or grana padano
  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

What to do:

  1. Peel and finely chop the onion and garlic, then trim, clean and slice the leeks.
  2. Wash the potatoes, carrots, celery and zucchini, then chop them all into small cubes by slicing lengthways first and then into dice (peeling the carrots but not potatoes).
  3. Wash the beans and drain them, then tail them and chop into 1cm lengths.
  4. Wash the parsley, pat dry then pick the leaves and roughly chop.
  5. Pour a film of olive oil into a medium stockpot over a medium heat and sauté the onion, garlic and leek for 5 minutes.
  6. Add all the rest of the chopped ingredients, the bay leaves and the tin of tomatoes.
  7. Drain and rinse the cannellini and borlotti beans then add them in.
  8. Cover with a litre of water, season and simmer for 10 minutes or so until the vegetables are tender – check by piercing a piece of potato with a sharp knife.
  9. Add the macaroni and simmer for another 8 to 10 minutes until cooked, adding a little more water if the soup is too thick.
  10. Meanwhile, for the pistou sauce: Peel the garlic and add to a pestle and mortar. Sprinkle in some flaked salt then start to pound to break down.
  11. Wash the basil and spin it dry, then pick off the basil leaves and add to the garlic. Pound until puréed, then finely grate in the parmesan (weighing the piece first) and muddle in the extra virgin olive oil to make a paste.
  12. Divide the soup into bowls and serve with a dollop of pistou on the top.

Notes: What is pistou? Why do we weigh the parmesan before starting to grate it?

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End of Year salad

This is where we clean out the garden in preparation for the big break… what better to do than throw it all in together?

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Fresh from the garden: all the last veggies of the year…
Recipe source: Melissa

Equipment:

  • Mortar and pestle
  • Citrus juicer
  • Measures: 1/3 cup, teaspoon
  • Teaspoon
  • Scissors
  • Paper towel
  • 2 baking trays
  • Bowls – 2 big, med, 4 small
  • Salad spinner
  • Chopping boards and knives
  • A deep-sided frying pan
  • Slotted spoon

 

 

Ingredients:

  • Kale
  • Cucumbers
  • Salad leaves
  • Bok choy or tatsoi
  • Tomatoes
  • 4 eggs

Herby vinaigrette dressing

  • 1 clove garlic
  • Flaked salt & black pepper
  • 1 lemon
  • 1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • A small handful mixed herbs: tarragon, marjoram, thyme, chives, salad burnet

What to do:

  1. For the dressing: Peel the garlic clove and put it in the mortar with a large pinch of salt. Gently pound to a paste. Juice the lemon and add the juice to the mortar (without pips) then stir the lot with the teaspoon and scrape it into the large bowl. Stir in the oil and grind some pepper, then whisk the dressing lightly. Wash and spin dry the herbs, pick off the leaves and snip finely with the scissors. Add to the dressing.
  2. For the crispy kale: Preheat oven to 180C. Wash the kale really well, checking for bugs or cocoons, and using scissors, cut the leaves from the stalks in large pieces. Spin leaves dry in the salad spinner, then dry extra well with paper towel, then place in a bowl and add in a few pinches of flaked salt and drizzle of olive oil. Massage all the flavour into the kale for a minute, then lay out on the baking trays and slide into the oven for 5 to 7 minutes until crispy.
  3. For the salad: Fill up the 2 big bowls with cold water & wash the salad leaves in several changes of water. Spin dry and wipe the bowls dry. Fill the small bowl with water and wash the small garnishing leaves and flowers. Reserve them carefully on a piece of paper towel then keep separate in the bowl.
  4. Wash the tomatoes and drain and then slice any large ones in half without squashing! Wash the cucumbers, peel alternating strips of each one and then slice into thin discs.
  5. To poach eggs: Fill the deep-sided frying pan 5cm deep with water and bring to a simmer. Fill the large bowl with cold water. Carefully crack each egg into a small bowl without breaking it and then carefully slide into the water. Let the pan sit for 4 minutes on the lowest heat before removing each egg into the bowl of cold water with a slotted spoon and reserving until needed.
  6. Add the salad leaves to the bowl with the herbs and the dressing. Gently turn the leaves in the dressing using a clean hand without squishing the leaves.
  7. Pile up the dressed leaves into the serving bowls with the  tomatoes and cucumber, sprinkle over the crispy kale, then carefully drain an egg and place in each bowl with the garnishing petals. Serve immediately.
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Broad bean, parmesan and pea mash

We love broad beans when they arrive in the spring – they’re a true seasonal and local veg! Our harvest wasn’t huge this year so we added frozen peas in too for bulk and sweetness.

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Fresh from the garden: broad beans, lemon, garlic, fresh herbs
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 6 at home or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • 2 saucepans & lids
  • 2 big mixing bowls
  • Chopping board
  • Grater
  • Garlic press
  • Scales
  • Measures: tablespoon, teaspoon
  • 2 colanders
  • Citrus juicer
  • Mortar & pestle
  • Serving bowls
Ingredients:

  • A large handful of broad beans
  • A cup of frozen peas
  • 50g grana padano or parmesan
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • Half a lemon
  • A clove of garlic
  • Cooking salt
  • Flaked salt & black pepper
  • A small handful tarragon, thyme and marjoram

What to do:

  1. Fill the two saucepans with water & set it to boil with the lid on.
  2. Pod the broad beans into the medium bowl and put the outer shells into the compost.
  3. Wash the lemon and zest it, and then juice the lemon. Peel the garlic clove and squeeze it through the press.
  4. Wash and dry the herbs and pick from stems, and finely chop if needed.
  5. Weigh the parmesan, then grate and reserve in the small bowl.
  6. Fill the big bowl with cold water.
  7. When the water is boiling, drop all the broad beans into one of the saucepans, and the frozen peas into the other saucepan with a teaspoon of cooking salt each and put the lid back on to bring back to the boil quickly. Boil for 3 minutes with the lid off.
  8. Then drain the broad beans into one of the colanders & then immediately refresh in the bowl of cold water. Drain the peas into the other colander and then drop into the big bowl.
  9. Double-pod the broad beans into the peas, discarding the outer skin into the chook bin.
  10. Scoop a few spoons of peas and broad beans into the mortar with a tablespoon of the olive oil and grind them with the pestle with a pinch of salt (you may have to do this in a few batches) until smooth – a few beanie lumps are fine!
  11. Stir in the lemon juice bit by bit, and taste – and add in the grated parmesan, garlic and herbs with a grind of pepper into the broad bean mixture. Taste again to check if enough salt.
  12. Spoon the mash into serving bowls and serve with some lovely bread or crispy flatbread.

Notes: What does ‘double-pod’ mean? Why do we do this to the broad beans? What other name are broad beans known by?

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Cornersmith’s bouillon

This recipe comes to us from the picklery Cornersmith in Marrickville. Bouillon is what we use instead of stock in all our soup and risotto recipes. The aim of the recipe is to use up excess vegetable parts – carrot tops, fennel tops, spinach stems, parsley stems etc.The recipe can be varied with the seasons by adding what you have on hand.

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: leeks, fennel, carrots, parsley, mint, coriander, onions
Recipe source: adapted from a recipe from the Cornersmith Café
Makes: 4 medium jars

Equipment:

  • Jars and lids
  • Large oven tray
  • Paper towel
  • Scales
  • Chopping boards & knives
  • Peelers
  • Large mixing bowls
  • Salad spinner, colander
  • Scissors
  • Wooden spoons
  • Food processor
  • Funnel, teaspoons
Ingredients:

  • 200g brown onions
  • 200g leeks
  • 200g fennel
  • 200g Dutch carrots
  • 200g celery
  • Carrot tops
  • 1 bunch parsley
  • 1 bunch mint
  • 1 bunch coriander
  • 40 sundried tomatoes
  • 1 head garlic
  • 200g fine cooking salt

What to do:

  1. Wash the jars and lids in hot soapy water, rinse well and drain upside down. Place all the jars onto an oven tray, right side up, and slide into the oven. Turn the oven on to 160C to sterilize for 15 minutes.
  2. Dry the lids with a clean piece of paper towel.
  3. Wash all the vegetables and scrub if needed. Trim any ugly bits and discard. Peel the onion & garlic, and carrots if needed.
  4. Wash the herbs, spin dry and finely snip, discarding any tough stalks.
  5. Using a large knife, chop all vegetables into small sized chunks. Snip the sun-dried tomatoes into thin slices using scissors.
  6. In batches if necessary, add the ingredients to the food processor.
  7. Process into a thick paste and then scrape out into a clean and dry large bowl. Mix the ingredients thoroughly with the salt so it is mixed in evenly. You can use your hands for this but beware of the onion fumes in your eyes!
  8. Put the funnel into the top of the sterilized jars.
  9. Fill the jars without touching any of the inside or rims, and seal tightly.
  10. You may want to ‘can’ the jars in a water-bath to preserve longer: Line a wide saucepan or stockpot with a rubber mat or tea towel, then place the full, sealed jars in so that none are touching the sides of the pot or each other. Fill with lukewarm water and then set to boil on high for between 10 and 20 minutes. Turn off then using tongs, carefully lift out the jars and leave to cool on a wooden board. Label when cool.

Notes: This is used as a replacement to stock: one tablespoon dissolved in 1 litre of boiling water. It can be added to stews and soups or any meals that need a boost of flavour.

Bouillon will last for a year unopened and stored in a cool dark place. Once opened, store it in the fridge and it should last you for at least 6 months.

ourkitchengarden.net

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Kitchen News 4th November 2015

ourkitchengarden.net

Potato gnocchi with parmesan, burnt butter and crispy sage. Rosemary and thyme grissini. Creamy hummus made with a recipe adapted from Ottolenghi’s Jerusalem book… these are some of the dishes our clever kids whipped up last week in the cottage! A major focus for one group was handling fragile lettuce: washing and spinning it dry and then rolling it up to store in the fridge until ready to compile a deliciously fresh and gorgeous looking Master salad with lemon vinaigrette. And we even made crispy herbed potato skins with leftovers from the gnocchi!

The Year 2 students continue their attack on Kitchen Garden – enthusiastically displaying their knife skills amongst other fabulous talents – and one class even got to sample one of our programs most successful and asked-for dishes ever: Globe artichokes with lemon and garlic vinaigrette. They’re very lucky as we’ve had a lot of trouble growing them in these last few years – the last ones we harvested in 2012! Hopefully we’ll have a few more popping up in the next few weeks. And I’m looking forward to seeing the Year 5 and 6 kids back next week too!

ourkitchengarden.net

Tea towel sales went through the roof so thank you to all who bought early. Year 2 and Kindergarten is SOLD OUT! We have other age groups but I am reclaiming my Monday and Friday mornings for a while so will be back in December – anybody wishing to buy some before then can see me in the cottage at 8.30am or 2.30pm Tuesdays, Wednesdays or Thursdays in the meantime.

Thanks Mx

And thanks for the little mufti Melissas last Friday! Loved all of you!

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Leafy salad with poached eggs, kale and herby mayo

ourkitchengarden.net

The list of ingredients we can add to a salad is endless… here at Bondi we base our salads on lettuce leaves, fresh herbs and then seasonal additions. This one is a favourite with just-poached eggs and a wonderfully creamy and tangy dressing, but the key is to show the children how to handle delicate lettuce leaves without crushing or bruising them (the lettuce, not the kids…) and the gentle art of cracking an egg without destroying the yolk!

Fresh from the garden: Lettuce, eggs, kale, edible flowers, spring onions, garlic, lemon, herbs

Recipe source: Melissa

Serves: 6 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

·       Mixing bowls – large, medium, small

·       2 salad spinners

·       Tea towels and paper towel

·       Chopping boards & knives

·       Saucepan and lid

·       Deep-sided non-stick frying pan

·       Slotted spoon

·       Stick blender &its cup

·       Measuring: jug, ½ cup, teaspoon

·       Scales

·       Scissors

·       Garlic press

·       Citrus juicer

·       Serving bowls

Ingredients:

  • 4 freshest eggs (plus two for the mayo)
  • A bunch of salad leaves & kale
  • A large handful of herbs
  • A few garnishing flowers
  • Any extras like radishes
  • White wine vinegar & olive oil

For the herby mayonnaise:

  • A small handful fresh herbs
  • 1 juicy lemon
  • 1 small garlic clove
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 1/2 cup rice bran oil
  • Flaked salt & black pepper

What to do:

For the salad:

  1. Fill up the 2 big bowls with cold water & wash the salad leaves in several changes of water. Spin the leaves dry and wipe the bowls dry.
  2. Lay out the tea towel and line it with kitchen paper. Spread the salad leaves over the paper and roll the whole lot up like a log. Keep the rolled parcel of leaves in the fridge until needed.
  3. Reserve the small garnishing leaves and flowers in a separate little bowl of cold water.
  4. Wash the kale and shake dry. Snip the leaves from the stalks and discard the stalks. Spin dry thoroughly, then put in a clean dry bowl, drizzle a little olive oil and a pinch of salt, and then massage the salty oil into the leaves with your fingers for 5 minutes.
  5. Fill up another bowl with water and wash the herbs. Spin the herbs dry and pick leaves, reserving in their own small bowl, discarding stalks into compost.
  6. Scrub the radishes and then finely slice using a sharp knife or a mandoline slicer. 

For the mayo:

  1. Meanwhile for the mayo, wash the herbs in a few changes of water, spin them dry and finely strip off leaves from the stalks (coriander stalks you can leave in).
  2. Cut the lemon in half and juice the halves. You will need 2 tablespoons lemon juice in total.
  3. Smash the garlic clove, peel it and squeeze it through the garlic press.
  4. Carefully separate the eggs and reserve the yolks in a small bowl.
  5. Into the stick blender cup add the egg yolks, the mustard and 2 teaspoons only of the lemon juice. Whizz together until all is combined.
  1. Measure the rice bran oil, then get a friend to help measure in the oil a tablespoon at a time every 30 seconds into the egg mixture while you are whizzing (this takes a few minutes so don’t rush it).
  2. Then slowly add in another 2 teaspoons of lemon juice, the pressed garlic, the herbs and a good sprinkle of salt and pepper. Blend until smooth. Taste and check if it needs any more lemon juice or salt and adjust if needed.

To poach the eggs:

  1. Fill the deep-sided frying pan with water to a depth of about 10cm, then bring it to the boil and then turn down to a bare simmer.
  2. Then break the eggs into separate little bowls, then slide them into the simmering water, one at a time until they’re all in, and let them cook, uncovered, for 4 minutes. Fill a large bowl with cold water.
  3. Then use a draining spoon to lift them from the water and transfer them to the bowl of cold water if you’re not ready to use them just yet.

To serve:

  1. Strip the kale leaves into smaller pieces and add them to the separate bowl. Drizzle over a little olive oil and pinch of flaked salt and then using your fingertips, rub it all in to the kale leaves to make them soft.
  2. Take the lettuce from the fridge and chop into smaller strips. Pop them into a big bowl, then drizzle about a teaspoon of olive oil, a teaspoon of white wine vinegar & a sprinkle of flaked salt over the whole lot.
  3. Add the kale into the lettuce and using your hands, turn the leaves to coat in the dressing and then divide the lot among your serving bowls.
  4. Spoon an egg at a time out of the water and dry off with some paper towel or a clean tea towel, and then carefully arrange one egg on the top of each salad.
  5. Drizzle the mayo over the top of each salad, followed by a sprinkle of herbs and the flowers and serve immediately!

Notes: What is mayo short for? What other salad dressings could you use? Why do we need to wash the leaves so well? Why do we roll the leaves up to put them in the fridge? Why don’t we always need to use vinegar to poach the eggs? Why do we put the eggs into cold water?

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