Posts Tagged With: vegetarian

Zucchini, mint and feta salad with crunchy pangrattato

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If you have a spiraliser then this dish is easy and looks fantastic! If not, then julienne your zucchini by slicing or peeling them into as thin strips as possible.

Fresh from the garden: zucchini, mint, lemon, sage, mint
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 6 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

·     Food processor

·     Measures – cup, ½ cup, tablespoon, teaspoon

·     Microplane zester

·     Paper towel

·     Large frying pan

·     Spiraliser

·     Scissors

·     Citrus juicer

·     Serving bowls and smaller bowls for pangrattato

 

 

 

 

Ingredients:

For the pangrattato:

·     1/2 teaspoon fennel seeds

·     1/2 teaspoon chilli flakes

·     2 tablespoons olive oil

·     Half a small loaf of sourdough bread

·     1/2 cup pepitas (pumpkin seeds)

·     1 lemon

·     3 sage leaves

For the salad:

·     3 zucchini

·     A small branch of mint leaves

·     3 tablespoons olive oil

·     100g Danish feta

·     Flaked salt

What to do:

For pangrattato:

  1. Break or tear the sourdough into small chunks and then blend up in the food processor until they resemble breadcrumbs. You’ll need about a heaped cup.
  2. Wash and wipe the lemon dry, then zest the lemon, taking only the thin layer of skin off and leaving the white pith on. Wash the sage leaves and gently press dry with a piece of paper towel. With scissors, snip into thin strips.
  3. Heat the 2 tablespoons of olive oil in the frying pan. Add the rest of the pangrattato ingredients and toss until golden and crunchy (this takes about 5 minutes). Taste and add more seasoning if needed. Set aside to cool and crisp up.

For zucchini salad:

  1. Wash the zucchini and wipe dry, then spiralise or julienne them into thin strips. Wash the mint, press dry with a piece of paper towel and using the scissors, snip them into thin strips. You should have about 2 tablespoons worth.
  2. Cut the zested lemon in half and juice one half.

To finish:

  1. Place zucchini in a dish, top with mint leaves, oil and the lemon juice and season with a grind of pepper. Check the seasoning and add a sprinkle of salt if needed. Weigh the feta and crumble what you need into the zucchini. Toss to combine and divide out into your serving bowls.
  2. To serve, top salad with a little of the pangrattato and serve the rest in little bowls on the side for each person to help themselves to, just before eating.

Notes: What does a heaped cup mean? How does a spiraliser work? What is pangrattato?

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French tomato tart

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The simple tarte à la tomate is a favourite French dish that makes use of all of those excess ripe summer tomatoes in the kitchen. This classic recipe is without cream or eggs in the filling but just a little kick of mustard smeared over the free-form pastry base.

Fresh from the garden: tomatoes, thyme, oregano
Recipe source: adapted from a recipe on sbs.com.au
Serves: 4 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Food processor
  • Measures: tablespoon, teaspoon
  • Plastic wrap
  • Mixing bowls – large, medium
  • Colander
  • Chopping boards and knives
  • Salad spinner
  • Large baking tray
  • Rolling pin
  • Serving plates
Ingredients:

·       300g (2 cups) plain flour

·       150g cold butter, chopped

·       1 egg

·       1 tablespoon cold milk

·       2 tablespoons whoegrain mustard

·       A couple of heirloom tomatoes

·       250g vine-ripened cherry tomatoes

·       4 sprigs thyme, plus extra to garnish

·       4 sprigs oregano, plus extra to garnish

·       Olive oil, to drizzle

What to do:

For the pastry:

  1. Process flour, butter and 1 teaspoon salt in a food processor until mixture resembles fine crumbs. Add whisked egg and milk, and process until a dough forms. Wrap dough in plastic wrap and refrigerate while you wash the tomatoes.

For the filling:

  1. Wash all the tomatoes and drain in the colander. Slice the large tomatoes into slices.
  2. Wash the herbs and spin dry. Strip off the leaves and reserve.

To finish the dish:

  1. Preheat oven to 200°C. Roll out dough between 2 sheets of baking paper to form a 3 mm-thick round. Transfer to a large oven tray and remove top sheet of baking paper.
  2. Spread dough with mustard, leaving a 3cm border around edge.
  3. Arrange sliced tomatoes over mustard so they are overlapping, then top with cherry tomatoes. Pinch and fold over edge of tart, then scatter with thyme and oregano leaves.
  4. Drizzle with oil and season with salt and pepper.
  5. Bake for 30 minutes or until pastry is golden and crisp. Garnish with extra oregano and thyme sprigs.
  6. Serve cut into slices.

Notes: What is tomato in French? What does freeform tart mean?

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Lemon myrtle tea

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We make all sorts of herbal tea variations at Bondi, using aromatic lemongrass leaves, lemon balm, lemon verbena, mint, lemon thyme, chamomile, citrus rind and ginger… The tea is easy to make and lovely chilled from the fridge overnight too, once the tea has brewed just remove the leaves so that it doesn’t stew.

Foraged bush tucker: lemon myrtle leaves
Recipe source: Melissa Moore
Makes: 3 litres

Equipment:

  • Stockpot
  • Serving jugs

 

Ingredients:

  • A bunch of lemon myrtle leaves
  • 3 litres water

 

What to do:

  • Fill the stockpot with water and set it on high to boil with the lid on.
  • Rinse the bunch of leaves well in cold water and shake dry. Remove the leaves from the branch, discarding the branch.
  • Once the water is boiling, turn the pot off and carefully drop the herbs in.
  • Let the tea steep for several minutes and serve, ladling the tea carefully into jugs.

Notes: What else is herbal tea know as? What other herbs or spices could you use? What does aromatic mean?

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Broccoli and lemon myrtle risotto

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This lovely risotto is textural and beautifully herby – especially with the subtle lemony tang of the lemon myrtle leaves – and very easy once you get past all the stirring! Serve just before eating while it’s still slightly soupy.

Foraged bush tucker: lemon myrtle leaves
Recipe source: Melissa Moore
Serves: 6 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Saucepan
  • Measures: scales, jug, cup, ¼ cup, tablespoon
  • Salad spinner
  • Garlic press
  • Mixing bowls
  • Chopping boards & knives
  • Grater & microplane zester
  • Ladle
  • Wooden spoon with a straight end
  • Heavy based stockpot
  • 4 soup plates or bowls to serve
Ingredients:

  • 1.5 litres water with 2 tablespoons bouillon (or 1 litre stock)
  • 3 lemon myrtle leaves
  • 1 brown onion
  • 3 garlic cloves
  • 1 large stalk broccoli
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 20g butter
  • 300g Arborio rice
  • 40g parmesan or grana padano
  • A small handful marjoram
  • Flaked salt & black pepper

What to do:

  1. Pour the water and bouillon into a saucepan, and bring it to a boil. When boiling, turn down to bare simmer and add the lemon myrtle leaves.
  2. Peel and finely chop the onion. Squeeze the garlic cloves through the press into a small bowl.
  3. Wash the broccoli & shake dry. Chop the stems into ½ cm pieces and add stems to the stock, reserving the florets. Wash the leaves, strip from the stalks and finely slice the leaves.
  4. Heat the olive oil and butter over medium heat in the stockpot. Add the chopped onion and cook gently for about three minutes until translucent but not brown. Add the garlic and cook gently for another few seconds.
  5. Stir in the rice until the grains separate and begin to crackle.
  6. Begin adding the simmering stock, a ladle at a time, and stir in. The stock should just cover the rice and bubble. Stir every minute or so for about 15 minutes.
  7. After about 10 minutes, add the broccoli florets & sliced leaves to the rice and keep stirring for about another 5 minutes. When the rice is just tender all the way through but still slightly firm, usually in about 20 minutes all up, it is done.
  8. Meanwhile, weigh and cut the parmesan & grate it. Wash and spin dry the marjoram, strip and discard the stems.
  9. Add the last ladleful of stock and the rest of the broccolini in to the rice. Stir in the marjoram and parmesan, and remove from the heat. Taste now and check the seasoning. The mixture should be creamy and lose.
  10. Serve into the bowls and eat right away!

Notes: What sort of rice is Arborio? Why do we use this sort of rice? Why do we fry the rice off first? What does ‘yield’ mean? What do lemon myrtle leaves look like?

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Tom yum soup with finger limes

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The finger lime is a unique and ancient Australian native – citrus australasica – found in the wild around the rainforest areas of SE Queensland and the northern rivers region of New South Wales. Inside the finger lime’s skin are hundreds of juice filled pearls or ‘lime caviar’ that burst in the mouth with a rare and exciting explosion of flavour. The finger lime’s lime caviar is rich in vitamin C and antioxidants. The colour varies according to the variety: it can be opaque, yellow, green, pink or red.

Foraged bush food: finger limes
Recipe source: Melissa Moore
Serves: 6 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Kettle
  • Chopping boards and knives
  • Paper towel
  • Salad spinner
  • Measures – tablespoon, teaspoon
  • Mixing bowls – selection
  • Serving bowls
  • Ladle

 

 

Ingredients:

  • 1.5 litres water
  • A clove of garlic
  • 3 stalks lemongrass
  • A small handful assorted mushrooms
  • A head of bok choi
  • 1 bunch fresh coriander
  • 1 lime
  • 1 tablespoon bouillon
  • 1 quantity tom yum paste (see recipe)
  • 2 kaffir lime leaves
  • 1 tablespoon fish sauce (optional)
  • A small handful finger limes

What to do:

  1. Make the paste recipe first (see separate tom yum paste recipe).
  2. Fill the kettle to the 1.5 litre mark and set it to boil.
  3. Peel and finely chop the clove of garlic.
  4. Cut or strip the leaves from the lemongrass (reserving the leaves for another time) and wash the stalks. Chop them into 10cm lengths and bash lightly.
  5. Wipe the mushrooms clean with a piece of paper towel, then slice them into very thin slices.
  6. Wash the bok choi, separating out the leaves and cleaning, and slice into thin strips.
  7. Cut the lime into quarters.
  8. Pour the hot water into the large saucepan and add the bouillon. Bring back to the boil and stir in all the tom yum paste and garlic and cook for about 2 minutes.
  9. Stir in the lemongrass batons and whole kaffir lime leaves.
  10. Mix in the mushrooms and sliced bok choi. Add the fish sauce if using and a squeeze of the lime quarters and simmer for another 5 minutes.
  11. Wash and spin the coriander and basil dry, then finely chop.
  12. Remove from heat, sprinkle in the chopped coriander and ladle into bowls.
  13. Cut the finger limes in half and squeeze out the little globes into bowls as garnish.

Notes: What do finger limes look like? What is inside a finger lime?

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Wattleseed damper

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Probably the most widely recognized bush tucker recipe is damper, a simple type of bread made of water and flour. Although the Aborigines originally baked this bread, it was the Europeans that gave it the name damper. Originally made with flour, salt, and water, it was baked in the hot coals of an open campfire. During colonial times it was a staple food in the bush because stockmen and drovers in remote areas could easily carry the dry ingredients. They needed to add only water to make the damper, and often served it with tea made in a cylindrical billy or billycan, a lightweight hanging pot with a close-fitting lid.

Bush tucker: wattleseed
Recipe source: adapted from australianflavour.net
Serves: 4 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

·       Bowls – large

·       Measures – cup, ½ cup, tablespoon, ½ teaspoon

·       Sifter or sieve

·       Table knife

·       Oven tray

·       Sharp knife

·       Pastry brush

·       Chopping board and knife

·       Serving plates

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 20g ground roasted wattleseed
  • 3 cups plain flour
  • 3 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 60g butter

 

What to do:

  1. Preheat oven to 200°C.
  2. Measure the milk and water into a small saucepan and set to heat on low. Weigh out the ground wattleseed and then add in to the milk. Bring to a simmer and then turn off the heat, then leave for 10 minutes to infuse.
  3. Sift the flour, baking powder and salt into a bowl, then rub in butter until mixture resembles fine crumbs.
  4. Make a well in the centre, add the combined milk and water and mix lightly with a knife until the dough leaves the sides of the bowl.
  5. Gently knead on a lightly floured surface and then shape into a round, put on a greased oven tray. Pat into a round 15-16cm diameter.
  6. With sharp knife, cut two slits across dough like a cross, approximately 1cm deep.
  7. Brush top of dough with milk. Sift a little extra flour over dough.
  8. Bake for 10 minutes, or until golden brown.
  9. Reduce heat to 170°C. and bake another 20 minutes.
  10. Using oven mitts, carefully slide the damper out of the oven and check that it is done: if you knock the loaf it should sound hollow inside – or you can poke a fork into the centre and see if it’s clean when pulled out.
  11. We divided our loaf into 4 and served each quarter whole, for each table to pull apart their own piece.

Notes: How would you adapt the recipe if you had no access to refrigeration?

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Roasted winter veggies with rosemary honey drizzle

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The colder weather brings us fennel, cauliflower and carrots and they’re delicious drizzled in buttery honeyed goodness!

Fresh from the garden: fennel, cauliflower, carrot, potato, rosemary
Recipe source: Melissa Moore
Serves: 6 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Large rimmed baking tray
  • Baking paper
  • Paper towel
  • Chopping boards and knives
  • Colander
  • Salad spinner
  • Mixing bowls
  • Spatula
  • Scales
  • Measures: ¼ cup, tablespoon, teaspoon
  • Small saucepan
  • Serving bowls
Ingredients:

  • 3 or 4 large carrots
  • Half a small cauliflower
  • A couple of fennel
  • 2 large potatoes
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1½ teaspoons coarse salt
  • 25g unsalted butter
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1 sprig fresh rosemary

 

What to do:

  1. Preheat oven to 220C. Line a large rimmed baking sheet with baking paper and set aside.
  2. Scrub the potatoes under running water and wipe dry. Without peeling, chop them into 2cm cubes by cutting into slices first, then rods, then cubes.
  3. Wash and shake dry the cauliflower and chop into small florets and cubes.
  4. Scrub the carrots and peel, then slice into small chunks.
  5. Wash the fennel, taking care to rinse out any hidden dirt. Chop into smallish pieces.
  6. In a large bowl, toss together all the veggies with the oil and salt until well combined. Place in an even layer on prepared baking sheet.
  7. Transfer to oven and roast, turning with a spatula once or twice during cooking, until browned and turnips are easily pierced with a paring knife, for about 25 minutes.
  8. Meanwhile, wash the rosemary sprig and wipe dry with paper towel. Strip the needles from the stalk and finely chop using a large knife. We will need about a tablespoon worth.
  9. Melt the butter in a small saucepan over medium heat. Add honey and rosemary, let simmer for a few seconds and remove from heat.
  10. Transfer veggies to serving bowls and drizzle with butter mixture. Toss to combine and serve.

Notes: What other winter veggies can you name? What does fennel smell like?

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Kerry’s Tasty Daal

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This is easy to make and delicious! Add a few flakes of chilli if you like it spicy.

Fresh from the garden: onion, garlic, capsicum, ginger, tomato, coriander
Recipe source: Melissa’s friend Kerry
Serves: 4 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Kettle
  • Measures: jug, cup, tablespoon, teaspoon
  • Potato peeler
  • Chopping boards and knives
  • Food processor
  • Stockpot
  • Flat-edged wooden spoon
  • Serving bowls

 

 

 

Ingredients:

  • 500ml water and a tablespoon of bouillon (or 500ml veggie stock)
  • 1 small onion
  • 2 cloves of garlic
  • ½ red capsicum
  • 2cm knob of ginger
  • 1 large tomato
  • Rice Bran oil
  • 1 teaspoon mustard seeds
  • 1 cup red lentils
  • 1 teaspoon turmeric
  • 1 teaspoon cumin powder
  • 1 small can of coconut milk
  • Salt & pepper to taste
  • Small bunch of fresh coriander

What to do:

  1. Fill the kettle with half a litre of water and set it to boil. When boiled pour it into the measuring jug, add the tablespoon of bouillon and stir.
  2. Peel and finely chop the onion and garlic. Wash and finely chop the half capsicum. Peel the skin from the ginger and finely chop.
  3. Wash and finely chop the tomato. Wash the coriander and spin dry. Chop stems and leaves.
  4. Heat a couple of tablespoons of oil in the stockpot and add the mustard seeds. Once they start popping add the chopped onions and capsicum and fry for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the garlic and ginger, then fry for another minute.
  5. Add lentils and fry for 2 minutes, then add turmeric & cumin powder.
  6. Add a bit of the bouillon water and half the tin of coconut milk, then just keep adding little bits of each until all absorbed, stirring as you go.
  7. After 5 minutes add the chopped tomato and a sprinkle of salt and pepper.
  8. Once lentils are soft (usually 20 minutes or so) divide into serving bowls and garnish with the chopped coriander. 

Notes: What is turmeric? What family do lentils come from?

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Warm salad of bok choy, roasted eggplant and tomatoes

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This salad can be adapted to pretty much anything you’ve got in your garden, fridge or pantry! You can add cheese, or a boiled egg or two, a tin of tuna or some roast chicken…

Fresh from the garden: eggplant, bok choy, tomatoes, basil,
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 4 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Chopping boards and knives
  • Baking tray
  • Baking paper
  • Pastry brush
  • Citrus juicer
  • Mixing bowls
  • Stick blender and cup
  • Measures: ¼ cup, tablespoon
  • Wok
  • Colander
  • Serving bowls
Ingredients:

  • One large eggplant
  • A lemon
  • A couple of sprigs of basil
  • A clove of garlic
  • ¼ cup olive oil plus extra to brush
  • Aged balsamic vinegar
  • Flaked salt and black pepper
  • A large handful of bok choy
  • A handful of little tomatoes
  • A log of soft goats’ cheese

 What to do:

To prepare the veggies:

  1. Preheat your oven to 180C.
  2. Wash and dry the eggplant. Trim the top end off and cut into thin slices. Cover a baking tray with baking paper and place the eggplant slices on top. Brush with a little olive oil, then slide into the oven and roast for 10 minutes until lightly browned.
  3. While the eggplant is roasting, juice the lemon, peel the garlic and wash the basil, picking the leaves and spin-drying them. Combine together the lemon juice, a pinch of salt, a grind of pepper, ¼ cup olive oil, garlic and most of the basil (reserving a few leaves for garnish) in a stick blender cup and whizz until totally smooth. Take the eggplant out of the oven and flip over. Brush the basil mixture over top and bake again for another 5 minutes or until cooked through and browning.
  4. Wash the bok choy, opening up the leaves slightly to dislodge any dirt, and shake dry over the sink. Slice the bok choy lengthways down the middle, and again into quarters. Heat the wok over a medium flame and pour about a tablespoon of olive oil in, and then the bok choy with a pinch of salt and a drizzle of balsamic vinegar. Cook for a few minutes until the leaves have wilted and the bulb part is beginning to blacken slightly.
  5. Wash the tomatoes, remove the stalks and slice – or if small, gently cut in half.

To assemble the salad:

  1. Remove the eggplant from the oven and leave to cool for a few minutes.
  2. Divide the cooked bok choy into serving bowls, and then scatter the eggplant pieces on top, and then the tomatoes. Open the packet of goats’ cheese and sprinkle blobs over the veggies.
  3. Drizzle over a little olive oil and balsamic with a pinch of salt and black pepper, and scatter over basil leaves torn into small pieces.

Notes: What is balsamic vinegar? Can you eat raw eggplant? What family does eggplant belong to?

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Ricotta fritters

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Fresh from the garden: eggs, lemon/ orange
Recipe source: adapted from a recipe by Tobie Puttock in Daily Italian
Makes: about 20 fritters

Tobie says, “People are likely to fall in love with you if you cook them these fritters – that’s how good they are. They are best served hot but can be eaten cold.” We say start this recipe early as the dough needs to rest in the fridge before cooking!

Ingredients:

  • 400g fresh ricotta
  • 3 free-range eggs
  • 4 tablespoons caster sugar
  • Finely grated zest of one lemon (although I used orange instead)
  • A pinch of bicarb soda
  • 3 tablespoons sultanas (I didn’t use these at all)
  • 200g plain flour
  • 2 cups vegetable oil (I used Rice Bran)
  • Icing sugar for dusting

What to do:

  1. Drain the ricotta of excess moisture and place it a large mixing bowl with the eggs: beat until smooth.
  2. Add the sugar, lemon (or orange) zest, bicarb soda, sultanas (if using) and flour and stir well to combine the ingredients.
  3. Cover with plastic film and rest the flour in the fridge for about an hour.
  4. Set out a plate lined with kitchen paper.
  5. Heat the oil in a heavy based saucepan, and test it by dropping in a pinch of flour: if it starts to sizzle, the oil is ready to fry.
  6. Use a tablespoon to scoop out dollops of dough mix and carefully drop them into the oil. Depending on the size of your saucepan you’ll probably be able to fry just a few at a time.
  7. Cook until the fritters turn a nice golden brown, turning them over to cook if needed, then draining well on kitchen paper.

Warning:

  • Whenever working with hot oil, take extreme care and keep small children and pets well away.
  • Never leave hot oil unattended.
  • Never fill the pan more than half way with oil.

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