Posts Tagged With: Indian

Kerry’s Tasty Daal

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This is easy to make and delicious! Add a few flakes of chilli if you like it spicy.

Fresh from the garden: onion, garlic, capsicum, ginger, tomato, coriander
Recipe source: Melissa’s friend Kerry
Serves: 4 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Kettle
  • Measures: jug, cup, tablespoon, teaspoon
  • Potato peeler
  • Chopping boards and knives
  • Food processor
  • Stockpot
  • Flat-edged wooden spoon
  • Serving bowls

 

 

 

Ingredients:

  • 500ml water and a tablespoon of bouillon (or 500ml veggie stock)
  • 1 small onion
  • 2 cloves of garlic
  • ½ red capsicum
  • 2cm knob of ginger
  • 1 large tomato
  • Rice Bran oil
  • 1 teaspoon mustard seeds
  • 1 cup red lentils
  • 1 teaspoon turmeric
  • 1 teaspoon cumin powder
  • 1 small can of coconut milk
  • Salt & pepper to taste
  • Small bunch of fresh coriander

What to do:

  1. Fill the kettle with half a litre of water and set it to boil. When boiled pour it into the measuring jug, add the tablespoon of bouillon and stir.
  2. Peel and finely chop the onion and garlic. Wash and finely chop the half capsicum. Peel the skin from the ginger and finely chop.
  3. Wash and finely chop the tomato. Wash the coriander and spin dry. Chop stems and leaves.
  4. Heat a couple of tablespoons of oil in the stockpot and add the mustard seeds. Once they start popping add the chopped onions and capsicum and fry for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the garlic and ginger, then fry for another minute.
  5. Add lentils and fry for 2 minutes, then add turmeric & cumin powder.
  6. Add a bit of the bouillon water and half the tin of coconut milk, then just keep adding little bits of each until all absorbed, stirring as you go.
  7. After 5 minutes add the chopped tomato and a sprinkle of salt and pepper.
  8. Once lentils are soft (usually 20 minutes or so) divide into serving bowls and garnish with the chopped coriander. 

Notes: What is turmeric? What family do lentils come from?

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Garlic naan

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We use a number of different dough recipes at Bondi Public, but this one is perfect to mop up sloppy sauces! We use the dough made by the previous class, and then make the new dough for the next.

Fresh from the garden: garlic
Recipe source: adapted from a recipe on taste.com.au
Serves: 8 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • 2 or 3 baking trays
  • Scales
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Small saucepan
  • Mixing bowls
  • Measures: jug, 1/2 cup, tablespoon, teaspoon
  • Plastic wrap
  • Pastry brush
  • Serving plates

 

Ingredients:

  • 80g butter or ghee at room temperature
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 2 teaspoons nigella seeds
  • 450g plain flour
  • 1 teaspoon dried yeast
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon caster sugar
  • 1/2 cup warm water
  • 1/2 cup natural yoghurt
  • 1 egg

What to do:

  1. Preheat oven to 180°C. Place oven trays into the oven to preheat.
  2. Use your fist to punch down the dough. Weigh the butter or ghee, and then add half to the dough and knead for a further 5 minutes or until ghee is well incorporated into the dough.
  3. Meanwhile, peel the garlic and finely chop. Melt the remaining ghee in a small saucepan over low heat. Add the garlic and cook for 30 seconds or until aromatic. Remove from heat.
  4. Divide dough into 8 even portions. Press or roll each portion into a 15 x 20cm tear shape, about 3mm thick.
  5. Sprinkle with the nigella seeds and gently push into the dough. Bring the preheated trays out of the oven and carefully place the naan onto them, and bake in oven for 6-8 minutes or until slightly puffed and golden brown.
  6. Use this time to make the dough for the next class: Combine the flour, yeast, salt and sugar in a large bowl. Whisk the egg lightly and then add to water, yoghurt and egg in a small jug. Add to the flour mixture and stir until mixture just comes together. Turn onto a lightly floured surface and knead for 5 minutes or until mixture is smooth. Place in a bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Set aside in a warm, draught-free place for at least 30 minutes to rise or in the fridge overnight.
  7. Remove the baked naan from oven and immediately brush with the ghee mixture. Cut into chunks and serve immediately.

Notes: Where does naan bread originate? What is ghee?

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Perfect steamed rice!

So many fantastic home cooks I know are scared of rice! When it comes to steaming you really don’t need a rice cooker (unless you’re cooking for 100 people!) as a simple saucepan will do the job perfectly…

ourkitchengarden.net

Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 8 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Measures – cup
  • Large saucepan & lid
  • Sieve
  • Knife
  • Serving bowl or small bowl and plates
Ingredients:

  • 3 cups jasmine or basmati rice
  • 4 cups cold water

What to do:

  • Measure the rice grains into the saucepan. Wash the rice with cold running water and swish with your hands. Drain carefully into a sieve and repeat 3 more times until the water is no longer milky. This helps remove excess starch and cleans the grains.
  • Empty the washed rice back into the pot and add the 4 cups of cold water. Turn the heat to high – when the water in the pot starts to bubble, stir then cover the pot and reduce heat to the lowest flame. Simmer for 15 minutes without disturbing.
  • After the 15 minutes is up, just turn off the heat without disturbing the saucepan. Just let it sit with the lid on for 5 minutes to finish the steaming process.
  • Using a knife, transfer the rice into a large serving bowl, fluffing as you go. Serve in one bowl, or alternatively cram spoonfuls of rice into a small deep bowl  – just rinsed & wet – until full and level, then place bowl upside-down onto a plate, tap and pull off the bowl leaving a bowl-shaped rice mound!

Notes: Where does rice come from? How is it grown? What other dishes can you make with rice?

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