Posts Tagged With: Baking

Wattleseed damper

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Probably the most widely recognized bush tucker recipe is damper, a simple type of bread made of water and flour. Although the Aborigines originally baked this bread, it was the Europeans that gave it the name damper. Originally made with flour, salt, and water, it was baked in the hot coals of an open campfire. During colonial times it was a staple food in the bush because stockmen and drovers in remote areas could easily carry the dry ingredients. They needed to add only water to make the damper, and often served it with tea made in a cylindrical billy or billycan, a lightweight hanging pot with a close-fitting lid.

Bush tucker: wattleseed
Recipe source: adapted from australianflavour.net
Serves: 4 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

·       Bowls – large

·       Measures – cup, ½ cup, tablespoon, ½ teaspoon

·       Sifter or sieve

·       Table knife

·       Oven tray

·       Sharp knife

·       Pastry brush

·       Chopping board and knife

·       Serving plates

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 20g ground roasted wattleseed
  • 3 cups plain flour
  • 3 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 60g butter

 

What to do:

  1. Preheat oven to 200°C.
  2. Measure the milk and water into a small saucepan and set to heat on low. Weigh out the ground wattleseed and then add in to the milk. Bring to a simmer and then turn off the heat, then leave for 10 minutes to infuse.
  3. Sift the flour, baking powder and salt into a bowl, then rub in butter until mixture resembles fine crumbs.
  4. Make a well in the centre, add the combined milk and water and mix lightly with a knife until the dough leaves the sides of the bowl.
  5. Gently knead on a lightly floured surface and then shape into a round, put on a greased oven tray. Pat into a round 15-16cm diameter.
  6. With sharp knife, cut two slits across dough like a cross, approximately 1cm deep.
  7. Brush top of dough with milk. Sift a little extra flour over dough.
  8. Bake for 10 minutes, or until golden brown.
  9. Reduce heat to 170°C. and bake another 20 minutes.
  10. Using oven mitts, carefully slide the damper out of the oven and check that it is done: if you knock the loaf it should sound hollow inside – or you can poke a fork into the centre and see if it’s clean when pulled out.
  11. We divided our loaf into 4 and served each quarter whole, for each table to pull apart their own piece.

Notes: How would you adapt the recipe if you had no access to refrigeration?

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Garlic naan

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We use a number of different dough recipes at Bondi Public, but this one is perfect to mop up sloppy sauces! We use the dough made by the previous class, and then make the new dough for the next.

Fresh from the garden: garlic
Recipe source: adapted from a recipe on taste.com.au
Serves: 8 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • 2 or 3 baking trays
  • Scales
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Small saucepan
  • Mixing bowls
  • Measures: jug, 1/2 cup, tablespoon, teaspoon
  • Plastic wrap
  • Pastry brush
  • Serving plates

 

Ingredients:

  • 80g butter or ghee at room temperature
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 2 teaspoons nigella seeds
  • 450g plain flour
  • 1 teaspoon dried yeast
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon caster sugar
  • 1/2 cup warm water
  • 1/2 cup natural yoghurt
  • 1 egg

What to do:

  1. Preheat oven to 180°C. Place oven trays into the oven to preheat.
  2. Use your fist to punch down the dough. Weigh the butter or ghee, and then add half to the dough and knead for a further 5 minutes or until ghee is well incorporated into the dough.
  3. Meanwhile, peel the garlic and finely chop. Melt the remaining ghee in a small saucepan over low heat. Add the garlic and cook for 30 seconds or until aromatic. Remove from heat.
  4. Divide dough into 8 even portions. Press or roll each portion into a 15 x 20cm tear shape, about 3mm thick.
  5. Sprinkle with the nigella seeds and gently push into the dough. Bring the preheated trays out of the oven and carefully place the naan onto them, and bake in oven for 6-8 minutes or until slightly puffed and golden brown.
  6. Use this time to make the dough for the next class: Combine the flour, yeast, salt and sugar in a large bowl. Whisk the egg lightly and then add to water, yoghurt and egg in a small jug. Add to the flour mixture and stir until mixture just comes together. Turn onto a lightly floured surface and knead for 5 minutes or until mixture is smooth. Place in a bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Set aside in a warm, draught-free place for at least 30 minutes to rise or in the fridge overnight.
  7. Remove the baked naan from oven and immediately brush with the ghee mixture. Cut into chunks and serve immediately.

Notes: Where does naan bread originate? What is ghee?

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Rosemary and tomato focaccia

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We love preparing dough, and this soft focaccia studded with tomatoes and rosemary is fantastic as part of an antipasto plate or with a hearty Italian-style soup. In class we use the previous class’s dough, and then make the new dough for the next class.

From the garden: tomatoes, rosemary
Recipe source: dough from a recipe by Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall
Serves: 4 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

·       Bowls – small, med, flat small

  • Measures – jug, teaspoon, tablespoon
  • Scales
  • Stand mixer & dough hook
  • Pastry brush
  • 20 x 30cm Swiss roll pan
  • Clean tea towel
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Serving plates
Ingredients:

For the topping:

·       Salt flakes

  • 1 large sprig of rosemary

·       A cup of cherry tomatoes

For the magic dough:

·       250g plain white flour

·       250g strong white flour

·       1½ level teaspoons fine sea salt

·       1 teaspoon instant dried yeast

·       1 tablespoon olive oil, plus a little extra for oiling

What to do:

  1. Preheat oven to 200°C.

For the focaccia:

  1. Brush the pan with 2 teaspoons of oil. Punch down the centre of the dough with your fist. Turn onto a lightly floured surface and knead for 2 minutes or until dough is elastic and has returned to its original size. Press into the prepared pan. Cover with the clean tea towel and set aside in a warm, draught-free place to prove for 20 minutes or until doubled in height.
  2. Meanwhile wash the rosemary & pat dry and pick the leaves from the stalks.
  3. Wash the tomatoes but leave any sepals on, and carefully dry on a piece of paper towel.
  4. Use your finger to press dimples into the dough. Brush with remaining oil and sprinkle over the rosemary and a sprinkle of salt. Gently press the tomatoes into the dough.
  5. Bake in oven for 25-30 minutes or until golden and the focaccia sounds hollow when tapped on base. Serve warm or at room temperature, carved into thin slices.
  6. While the focaccia is cooking you can make the dough for the next class before cleaning up!

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Now make the magic dough for the next class:

  1. Put the two flours into the bowl of the stand mixer with the salt and yeast. Mix well using the dough hook. Add the oil and 325ml warm water and mix to a rough dough. Knead for 5–10 minutes, until smooth. This is quite a loose and sticky dough, which is just as it should be – you get better-textured bread this way – so try not to add too much flour if you can help it, it will become less sticky as you knead.
  2. Trickle a little oil into a clean bowl, add the kneaded dough and turn it in the oil so that the bottom is covered with a light film. Cover with plastic wrap and leave in a warm place to rise until doubled in size – at least an hour, probably closer to two.

 Notes: What is process of doubling the dough in size called? What is a tomato sepal?

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Veggie patch and feta frittate

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So we come to the last weeks of term and need to use up a little bit of this and bit of that growing in the garden. This recipe is perfect to do just that!

Fresh from the garden: eggplant, squash, capsicum, eggs, rocket, parsley
Recipe source: Melissa
Makes: 30 individual frittate

Equipment:

  • Pastry brush
  • 3 x 12-hole large cupcake tins
  • Mixing bowls – 2 large, 2 med
  • Chopping board & knives
  • Potato peeler
  • Salad spinner & paper towel
  • Large frying pan or wok
  • Grater, scales
  • Wooden spoon
  • Tongs, whisk
  • Serving plates
Ingredients:

  • A small selection of ripe veggies: eggplant, squash, capsicum, leek
  • 1 large sweet potato
  • Large handful of rocket
  • Small handful marjoram and parsley
  • Olive oil
  • Flaked salt and black pepper
  • 200g feta cheese
  • 25g parmesan
  • 12 large eggs
   

What to do:

 

  1. Preheat the oven to 180C. Pour a little olive oil into one cupcake hole in each tin and using the pastry brush, spread it into 30 of the holes.
  2. Peel the sweet potato, and then chop flesh evenly into 1cm cubes. Wash the others veggies and chop into thin slices or small cubes.
  3. Wash the rocket leaves in several changes of water and spin dry. Chop the stalks and leaves into very thin ribbons.
  4. Wash the herbs and pat dry with paper towel. Strip the leaves from the stalks & chop finely.
  5. Heat the frying pan with the oil and toss in the sweet potato, leek and veggies. Season well with salt and pepper. Cook, turning occasionally, for about 4 minutes over medium heat until the cubes are just tender and lightly golden at the sides. Add in the rest of the veggies and cook for another few minutes, then add the rocket and cook until wilted.
  6. Meanwhile, cut the feta into small cubes and grate the parmesan.
  7. Then add the cubed feta and gently stir to mix in.
  8. In the large bowl, lightly beat the eggs with the herbs, parmesan, a pinch of salt and a grind of pepper.
  9. Divide the veggie and feta mixture evenly into the cupcake holes, spoon the eggy herb mixture over and bake in 180C oven for about 20 minutes.
  10. Carefully prise out with a plastic knife if sticking, then divide onto serving plates.

 Notes: Why do we need to preheat the oven? What is feta cheese? What does to prise mean?

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Pao de queijo

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These Brazilian cheeseballs are fun, and although messy, are super-easy to make and are traditionally served with soup or at brekky. Best of all, they are gluten-free so are great for those with Coeliac disease or gluten intolerance.

Recipe source: inspired by Ligia, our Garden Specialist from 2011 to 2013
Makes: 30 cheese balls, give or take

Equipment:

  • 2 large bowls
  • Sieve
  • Blender
  • Measuring jug
  • Scales
  • Metric teaspoon
  • Grater, fork
  • 2 x 12 hole muffin tins
  • Pastry brush
  • Ladle
  • Serving plates

 

Ingredients:

  • 450g manioc starch*
  • 250ml milk
  • 250ml vegetable oil
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 100g grana padano

 

What to do:

  • Preheat the oven to 180C.
  • Measure out the manioc starch and then sieve into a bowl with the salt.
  • Grate the cheese and add to the bowl.
  • Crack the eggs into the other bowl and lightly whisk with the fork.
  • Measure out the milk and vegetable oil and add to the eggs. Stir to incorporate, then pour into the flour and stir thoroughly.
  • Ladle all the ingredients into the blender and blend until smooth.
  • Grease the muffin tins with a little oil.
  • Ladle out the mixture into the holes of the muffin tins until each hole is just over ½ full.
  • Bake for 20 minutes, swapping trays halfway, until golden and cooked through.
  • Carefully tip out onto serving plates.

*this can be found in the Brazilian section of your local exotic grocer! Tapioca flour or arrowroot flour can also be substituted successfully.

Notes: What are arrowroot, tapioca and manioc? What else do we use the blender for? What happens to the balls as they cook? What language do they speak in Brazil?

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Garlicky rosemary flatbreads

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The dough needs to prove for at least an hour, so at Bondi, the previous class makes the dough for the current class, and the current class makes the dough for the next class. Simple!

Fresh from the garden: garlic, rosemary
Recipe source: adapted from a recipe by Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall in Veg Every Day
Serves: 8 or 28 tastes

Equipment:

  • Measures – jug,tablespoon, teaspoon, ½ teaspoon
  • Stand mixer
  • Scales
  • Bowls – large, medium
  • 2 non-stick frying pans
  • Rolling pins
  • Tongs & pastry brush
  • Plate & paper towel
  • Serving plates
Ingredients:

For the magic dough:

·       250g plain white flour
·       250g strong white flour
·       1½ level teaspoons fine sea salt
·       1 teaspoon instant dried yeast
·       1 tablespoon olive oil, plus a little extra for oiling

For the garlic oil:

  • About 120ml olive oil
  • 1 fat garlic clove
  • 1 long branch of rosemary 

What to do:

For the garlic oil:

  1. Wash the rosemary stalk, wipe dry with paper towel and strip the leaves from the stalk. Peel the garlic clove and very finely chop it. Combine the olive oil, rosemary and garlic in a frying pan and place over a medium heat. You’re not going to fry it, just warm it through to take the edge off the garlic. So as soon as you see the first signs of a sizzle, pour the oil and garlic out of the pan into a small bowl to infuse. Wipe the frying pan clean.

For the flatbreads:

  1. Knock back the risen dough, divide it int0 golf-ball sized balls and roll them into flat circles, as thin and round as you can.
  2. Meanwhile heat your non-stick frying pans over high heat until smoking hot.
  3. Carefully lay one flatbread in the pan and cook for about 2 minutes, until bubbly on top and patched with brown spots on the base. Flip over and cook for 1-2 minutes more. Remove immediately to a plate and paint with some of the garlicky rosemary oil. Scatter with a little flaked salt too. Repeat with all the dough. Cut the oiled flatbreads into wedges to serve.

Now make the magic dough for the next class:

  1. Put the two flours into the bowl of the stand mixer with the salt and yeast. Mix well using the dough hook. Add the oil and 325ml warm water and mix to a rough dough. Knead for 5–10 minutes, until smooth. This is quite a loose and sticky dough, which is just as it should be – you get better-textured bread this way – so try not to add too much flour if you can help it, it will become less sticky as you knead.
  2. Trickle a little oil into a clean bowl, add the kneaded dough and turn it in the oil so that the bottom is covered with a light film. Cover with plastic wrap and leave in a warm place to rise until doubled in size – at least an hour, probably closer to two.

Notes: What other recipes can we use the Magic Dough in? What is strong flour?

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Rosemary shortbread

Allison was our gardener before Byron and she suggested this recipe to me. I was sceptical at first but lo! she brought some in that she had made and they were deeeeeelish! The rosemary bizarrely makes the biscuits taste of aromatic spices like cinnamon and ginger!

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Fresh from the garden: rosemary
Recipe source: adapted from a recipe by Yvette Van Boven in Home Made
Serves: 8 at home or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Paper towel
  • Baking paper
  • Measures: tablespoon
  • Scales
  • Medium baking tray
  • KitchenAid stand mixer with paddle attachment
  • Bowls – big, med, small
  • Butter knife and fork
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Cellophane bags and ribbon if needed
Ingredients:

  • 150g butter at room temperature
  • 50g caster sugar
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 250g self-raising flour
  • 1 pinch salt
  • A medium branch of rosemary with extra sprigs to garnish

What to do:

  1. Preheat the oven to 170C.
  2. Wash the rosemary and wipe dry. Strip the needles from the medium branch and finely chop. You will need about 2 tablespoons worth.
  3. Line the baking tray with a piece of baking paper.
  4. Beat the butter and the sugar and honey into a creamy mass. Stir in the flour, with the rosemary and salt. Do not beat too long, it just has to be well blended. Knead a few times on a countertop dusted with flour until it turns into a smooth dough ball.
  5. Press the dough into the baking tray and even out. Cut the raw slab into small equal fingers with the edge of the butter knife.
  6. Prick holes in the dough with a fork and garnish each wedge with a small sprig of rosemary.
  7. Bake the shortbread in the oven for 15-20 minutes until light brown. Leave to cool in the dish for 10 minutes and then carefully remove it. You can now break it along the scored lines and leave to cool further.
  8. And serve! Or if giving as presents, slip into cellophane bags when cold and tie with ribbon. 

Notes: What other dishes can you use rosemary in? Why should we not beat the ingredients for too long? What other flavourings could you use?

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Silverbeet and ricotta tart

This is an open tart filled with a lovely soft silverbeet mixture. To save time, we use the pastry dough made by the class before, and then make the pastry for the next class.

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Fresh from the garden: silverbeet, marjoram, eggs, onion, lemon
Recipe source: adapted by Melissa from the recipe in The Silver Spoon
Serves: 6 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Rolling pin
  • 26cm tart tin
  • Fork
  • Aluminium foil
  • Baking beans
  • Oven mitts
  • Chopping boards & knives
  • Mixing bowls – selection
  • Large frying pan
  • Whisk
  • Measuring cups – 1, ½, ¼
  • Scales
  • Large metal spoon
  • Microplane grater
  • Food processor
  • Cling film
  • Serving plates

 

Ingredients:

Italian shortcrust pastry

  • 1 lemon
  • 200g plain flour plus extra for rolling
  • 100g cold unsalted butter
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tablespoon iced water

Tart filling

  • An onion
  • 6 silverbeet stalks & leaves
  • 3 sprigs marjoram
  • 30g unsalted butter
  • 3 free-range eggs
  • 1 cup milk
  • ¼ cup cream
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • 1 nutmeg
  • 100g ricotta

What to do:

Blind baking the pastry:

  • Preheat oven to 180C.
  • Roll out pastry onto floured surface to approximately 4mm thick.Rolling the pastry onto a rolling pin, lift it gently into the tart tin, and prick all over with a fork. Place a sheet of foil to cover the pastry, empty in the baking beans and blind bake in the oven for 15 minutes.

Preparing the tart:

  • Finely chop the onion and thoroughly wash the silverbeet. Wash, dry & pick the marjoram leaves.
  • Melt the butter in the large frying pan over medium/low heat. Add the onion and cook gently on a low heat, stirring regularly for 5 minutes.
  • Meanwhile shake off the excess water from the silverbeet, and slice it (including the stalks) finely. Add it to the frying pan and cook, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes or so until it’s wilted but the leaves are still deep green. (If there is liquid in the base of the pan, briefly increase the heat to boil it off.) Turn off the heat. Set aside.
  • Whisk the eggs in the large bowl to break them up. Weigh the ricotta then push it through the sieve into the bowl then stir in the milk, cream, and a little salt, pepper and a grate of nutmeg. Stir in the silverbeet and the marjoram.
  • Using the oven mitts, remove the tart shell from the oven and let it cool for a few minutes. Pull off the beans (reserving them for future use) & discard the foil.
  • Using the large metal spoon, spread the silverbeet mixture evenly over the base of the tart shell.
  • Bake the tart for about 30 minutes until it is golden and lightly set. Use this time to make the pastry for the next class.
  • After 30 minutes is up, check the tart by inserting the tip of a knife into the middle and gently pressing the sides of the cut apart. The filling should be softly set with no liquid running into the cut.
  • Remove it from the oven and leave it to cool and settle for a few minutes before serving. Then just slip off the outer ring of the tin, gently slide the tart onto a clean chopping board to slice before placing onto your serving plates.

To make the pastry:

  • Carefully zest the lemon using the microplane grater.
  • For the pastry sift the flour and add to salt in food processor. Chop the butter and add to flour mixture – whiz until mixture resembles fine breadcrumbs.
  • Sprinkle in the zest and pulse to incorporate.
  • Separate the egg and add the yolk only to processor with the cold water and motor running.
  • As soon as the pastry resembles a ball, take out of processor. Flatten dough to form a disc and wrap in cling film. Refrigerate for at least an hour.

Notes: What else could be used in the filling instead of silverbeet? Why do we ‘blind bake’ & what does it mean? What does ‘shortcrust’ mean?

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Bush tucker: Lemon myrtle shortbread

Lemon myrtle leaves are wonderful to use steeped in liquid – in oil, water, milk or stock – as the flavour permeates so well. This recipe uses lemon myrtle leaves that were dried in a dehydrator and then blended with sugar and used for the intense flavour.

 ourkitchengarden.net

Foraged bush tucker food: lemon myrtle leaves
Recipe source: adapted from Jill Dupleix’s recipe for Anytime Shortbread in ‘Simple Food’
Makes: about 30 biscuits

Equipment:

  • Baking trays
  • Baking paper
  • Stick blender with bowl attachment
  • Sieve
  • Scales
  • Mixing bowls
  • Food processor
  • Sieve
  • Chopping board and knife
  • Cling film
  • Rolling pins
  • Biscuit cutters
  • Serving plates
Ingredients:

  • 2 large or 3 small dried lemon myrtle leaves
  • 50g caster sugar
  • 300g unsalted butter, soft
  • 100g icing sugar
  • Pinch of sea salt
  • 300g plain flour
  • 150g rice flour or cornflour

 

What to do:

  • Heat the oven to 150C. Line the baking trays with baking paper.
  • Tear up the lemon myrtle leaves into the stick blender bowl attachment with the caster sugar and blitz until the leaves are tiny specks. Then pour out the contents into the sieve set over a medium bowl and shake the sugar through. Discard the bits of leaf.
  • Combine the butter, icing sugar and sea salt in the bigger food processor and whiz until smooth.
  • Sift together the flour and rice flour into a medium bowl, then add it to the processor with the blended caster sugar – pulsing off and on, scraping down the sides from time to time, until the mixture gathers into a ball. Knead for a minute or two with your hands until smooth, then cut into two, wrap in cling film and refrigerate for 30 minutes. Tidy & wipe down your workspace.
  • Turn out onto a floured surface and pat or lightly roll out the dough until it is 1cm Cut into shapes with the biscuit cutters. Reshape the scraps and cut more shapes. Place on a baking tray and prick with a fork.
  • Bake on the middle shelf of the oven for 10 minutes, then turn the tray around and bake for another 5 to 10 minutes until touched with colour. Leave to cool on the tray.
  • Divide among serving plates and gobble up!

Notes: This shortbread can be stored in an airtight container for up to 2 weeks.

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Bush tucker: Pizza bianca with Warrigal greens, kale and dolcelatte

Warrigal greens are high in oxalic acid – and poisonous raw in large quantities – so need to be properly cooked first before eating. We blanch our leaves first in boiling water for a few minutes and then refresh before draining, and then using.

ourkitchengarden.net

Foraged bush tucker food: Warrigal greens
Recipe source: adapted from a recipe by Bill Granger in Sunday Life Magazine
Makes: 2 large pizzas

ourkitchengarden.net

Equipment:

  • Stand mixer, bowl and dough hook
  • Measures: cup, ½ cup, tablespoon, teaspoon, ½ teaspoon
  • Plastic wrap
  • Bowls – 2 medium, 2 small
  • Stockpot
  • Chopping boards and knives
  • Frying pan
  • Wooden spoon
  • 2 large oven trays
  • Rolling pins
  • Pastry brush
  • Metal spoons
  • Tongs
  • Wide egg lifter
  • Large wooden board
  • Pizza cutters
  • Serving plates
Ingredients:

For the pizza base:

  • 4 cups strong white bread flour plus extra for kneading
  • 2 teaspoons instant yeast
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt

For the pizza topping:

  • 4 tablespoons olive oil, plus extra for drizzling
  • 4 garlic cloves
  • A large handfulWarrigal greens
  • 4 large stalks of kale
  • A knob of butter
  • ½ teaspoon chilli flakes
  • 100g crème fraîche
  • 100g dolcelatte or other mild blue cheese
  • 2 handfuls of rocket

What to do:

For the pizza base, in advance:

  • Put the flour, yeast, sugar and salt into the bowl of the stand mixer and stir to combine. Make a well in the centre and pour in 1½ cups of tepid water. Turn mixer on and knead for 10 minutes until smooth and elastic.
  • Turn out onto your work surface and knead by hand for another minute or so, then place in a lightly oiled bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Leave for an hour until doubled in size.

To make the topping:

  • Half fill the stockpot with water and set to boil. Wash and shake the Warrigal greens dry, then when the water is boiling, add the greens and blanch for 3 minutes. Drain and refresh in a big bowl of cold water, then drain again.
  • Wash the kale then slice the leaves from the stalks, and chop into ribbons. Peel and thinly slice the garlic.
  • Heat the olive oil in the frying pan & gently cook the garlicand sizzle for a minute until fragrant. Add the kale ribbons and toss to coat in the oil. Pour in a cup of hot water and a teaspoon of bouillon and cook the kale gently until most of the liquid has evaporated and the leaves have wilted. Add in the Warrigal greens and toss to coat in the oil for one minute.
  • Toss in the butter and chilli flakes and shake the pan to coat the leaves. Set aside.
  • ourkitchengarden.net

Assembling the pizza:

  • Preheat the oven to 200C.
  • Brush the baking trays all over with a little olive oil.
  • With the dough still in the bowl, punch any air out, then divide into two and roll them out on a lightly floured surface. Transfer to the greased trays, pressing and pushing the dough into the corners using the palm of your hands.
  • Measure out the crème fraîche and dolcelatte.
  • Spoon the crème fraîcheover the pizza bases, then top with the Warrigal greens mix and chunks of dolcelatte.
  • Wash the rocket in a few changes of cold water and then spin it dry. Chop any large leaves into smaller ribbons. Reserve until the pizzas are cooked.

Baking the pizza:

  • Drizzle generously with olive oil and bake for 15-20 minutes until cooked through.
  • Use this time to make the dough for the next class if needed.
  • You may want to slip the pizza off the trays onto the rack for the last few minutes, so that you get a really crusty base.
  • Once the pizzasare done, transfer them to the large wooden board using the wide egg lifter.
  • Cut the pizzas crossways into small squares, and divide onto serving plates.
  • Sprinkle with rocket leaves and serve.
  • Yum!

Notes:What are Warrigal greens like and where do they grow? What is crème fraîche? What is dolcelatte and what does its name mean?

ourkitchengarden.net

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