Posts Tagged With: soup

Tom yum soup with finger limes

IMG_2355

The finger lime is a unique and ancient Australian native – citrus australasica – found in the wild around the rainforest areas of SE Queensland and the northern rivers region of New South Wales. Inside the finger lime’s skin are hundreds of juice filled pearls or ‘lime caviar’ that burst in the mouth with a rare and exciting explosion of flavour. The finger lime’s lime caviar is rich in vitamin C and antioxidants. The colour varies according to the variety: it can be opaque, yellow, green, pink or red.

Foraged bush food: finger limes
Recipe source: Melissa Moore
Serves: 6 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Kettle
  • Chopping boards and knives
  • Paper towel
  • Salad spinner
  • Measures – tablespoon, teaspoon
  • Mixing bowls – selection
  • Serving bowls
  • Ladle

 

 

Ingredients:

  • 1.5 litres water
  • A clove of garlic
  • 3 stalks lemongrass
  • A small handful assorted mushrooms
  • A head of bok choi
  • 1 bunch fresh coriander
  • 1 lime
  • 1 tablespoon bouillon
  • 1 quantity tom yum paste (see recipe)
  • 2 kaffir lime leaves
  • 1 tablespoon fish sauce (optional)
  • A small handful finger limes

What to do:

  1. Make the paste recipe first (see separate tom yum paste recipe).
  2. Fill the kettle to the 1.5 litre mark and set it to boil.
  3. Peel and finely chop the clove of garlic.
  4. Cut or strip the leaves from the lemongrass (reserving the leaves for another time) and wash the stalks. Chop them into 10cm lengths and bash lightly.
  5. Wipe the mushrooms clean with a piece of paper towel, then slice them into very thin slices.
  6. Wash the bok choi, separating out the leaves and cleaning, and slice into thin strips.
  7. Cut the lime into quarters.
  8. Pour the hot water into the large saucepan and add the bouillon. Bring back to the boil and stir in all the tom yum paste and garlic and cook for about 2 minutes.
  9. Stir in the lemongrass batons and whole kaffir lime leaves.
  10. Mix in the mushrooms and sliced bok choi. Add the fish sauce if using and a squeeze of the lime quarters and simmer for another 5 minutes.
  11. Wash and spin the coriander and basil dry, then finely chop.
  12. Remove from heat, sprinkle in the chopped coriander and ladle into bowls.
  13. Cut the finger limes in half and squeeze out the little globes into bowls as garnish.

Notes: What do finger limes look like? What is inside a finger lime?

IMG_2411

Advertisements
Categories: Kitchen Garden, Recipe | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The best pumpkin soup ever!

FullSizeRender

This classic soup recipe has got to be the easiest one of all – and takes no time to cook! If you want to be a bit grown-up you can also garnish with some lightly toasted pine nuts and a dollop of Greek yoghurt but my kids like it just as it is…

Fresh from the garden: pumpkin, leek, thyme, coriander
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 6 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Kettle
  • Chopping boards & knives
  • Mixing bowls
  • Measures: tablespoon
  • Scales
  • Salad spinner
  • Large stockpot
  • Stick blender
  • Ladle
  • Serving bowls
  • Scissors
Ingredients:

  • 1kg pumpkin, any type
  • One large leek
  • A small bunch of thyme
  • 20g butter
  • Olive oil
  • A tablespoon of ground cumin
  • A tablespoon of ground coriander
  • 1.5 litres water
  • 2 tablespoons bouillon
  • Flaked salt and black pepper
  • A small bunch of coriander

 What to do:

  1. Fill the kettle to 1.5 litres and set it to boil.
  2. Wash the pumpkin then place on a chopping board and scoop out all the seeds and membranes, saving for the chooks. Carefully slice off the skin – you may need to chop it up into a few smaller pieces first – then slice the pumpkin flesh into thin slices and reserve.
  3. Wash the leek under running water, trimming off the root and outer rough leaves, and slicing half way down the middle lengthways and peeling out to release any dirt trapped inside. Then slice into thin rings.
  4. Wash the thyme and dry it, then strip off the leaves and reserve. Wash the coriander and spin dry and reserve.
  5. Heat the butter and a glug of olive oil in the stockpot until bubbling, then add the chopped leek, the thyme and a good pinch of salt. Cook, stirring occasionally for a few minutes until the leek softens.
  6. Add in the sliced pumpkin and the two spices and stir again, then put the lid on the stockpot and turn right down to the lowest simmer for 5 minutes.
  7. Add in the boiling water until just covering the pumpkin, add in the bouillon with a grind of pepper and simmer for another 10 minutes.
  8. Meanwhile using the scissors, snip the coriander stalks and leaves into tiny pieces
  9. Plug in the stick blender and whizz until super-smooth. Taste to check if there is enough salt and add if needed.
  10. Ladle into bowls and garnish with coriander snips and serve straight away!

Notes: Where does the dirt hide in a leek? Is pumpkin skin edible?

Categories: Kitchen Garden, Recipe | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Kale, potato and egg soup

IMG_1709

Amazing what you can put in a soup isn’t it? Sounds very simple this one, but the flavours and bold and bright at the end. And it’s perfect for this freezing, wintry and blustery day…

Fresh from the garden: potatoes, garlic, kale, eggs
Recipe source: adapted from a recipe on thekitchn.com
Serves: 4 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Chopping boards & knives
  • Garlic press
  • Measures: tablespoon, teaspoon
  • Medium stockpot
  • 4 little bowls or ramekins
  • Ladle
  • Microplane grater
  • 4 serving bowls

 

Ingredients:

  • 2 medium yellow potatoes
  • 3 garlic cloves
  • 1 teaspoon cooking salt
  • 1.5 litres water
  • 2 tablespoons bouillon
  • 1 bunch kale (about 15 big leaves)
  • 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar
  • 4 large eggs
  • Flaked salt and pepper
  • 20g grana padano or parmesan cheese
  • Extra-virgin olive oil

What to do:

  1. Scrub the potatoes then chop it onto centimetre cubes. Peel the garlic cloves and squeeze them through the garlic press.
  2. Add potato, garlic, salt, water and bouillon to a medium stockpot over medium-high heat. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to simmer.
  3. While the potatoes start to cook, wash the kale and shake dry over the sink. Remove any thick, tough stems and chop them into tiny pieces. Add the chopped stems to the pot with the potatoes and simmer for 2 minutes.
  4. Stack the leaves of kale on top of each other. Slice them crosswise into thin ribbons, and add them to the pot with the potatoes and kale stems. If necessary, add more stock or water to the pot to just about cover the kale.
  5. Cover the pot and let the soup cook for 8 to 10 minutes. The soup is ready when the potatoes are easily pierced with a fork, and when a ribbon of kale has become tender, but has not yet become stringy or pulpy. Stir in the vinegar. Taste and season with more salt and fresh cracked pepper. Also add more stock or water if a more liquid soup is desired.
  6. To finish, crack the eggs into little bowls, and then gently slide them into the soup. Ladle some of the soup broth on top of the eggs to submerge them. Put the lid back on the pot and cook for 4 minutes. When done, the whites of the eggs should be opaque, but the yolk should still be soft. If the eggs break into the soup before they are poached, just use a fork to swirl them into the soup.
  7. Carefully spoon the eggs into a soup bowls. Ladle the soup on top. Finish with a grating of grana padano cheese and a thin drizzle of olive oil and serve.

Notes: What else could you put into a soup? What else could you use instead of kale?

IMG_1686

Categories: Kitchen Garden, Recipe, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Tom Yum soup

IMG_0448

This soup from Thailand is great if you have a cold, as it has a warm spicy heat, and if you leave the fish sauce out is ideal for vegans and vegetarians. If you do eat meat though, you can add sliced raw chicken here to poach for 5 minutes at the end.

Fresh from the garden: lemongrass, garlic, ginger, chillies, coriander, spring onions, limes
Recipe source: adapted from a recipe by David Thompson

Equipment:

·       Kettle

·       Chopping boards and knives

·       Paper towel

·       Salad spinner

·       Measures – tablespoon, teaspoon

·       Mixing bowls – selection

·       Serving bowls

Ingredients:

·       1.5 litres water

·       A clove of garlic

·       3 stalks lemongrass

·       150g assorted mushrooms

·       1 bunch fresh coriander leaves

·       1 sprig fresh basil leaves

·       1 lime

·       1 tablespoon bouillon

·       1 quantity tom yum paste (see recipe)

·       2 kaffir lime leaves

·       1 tablespoon fish sauce (optional)

·       1 teaspoon chopped fresh green chilli (optional)

 What to do:

  1. Fill the kettle to the 1.5 litre mark and set it to boil.
  2. Peel and finely chop the clove of garlic.
  3. Cut or strip the leaves from the lemongrass (reserving the leaves for another time) and wash the stalks. Chop them into 10cm lengths and bash lightly.
  4. Wipe the mushrooms clean with a piece of paper towel, then slice them into very thin slices.
  5. Wash and spin the coriander and basil leaves dry, then finely chop. Cut the lime into quarters.
  6. Pour the hot water into the large saucepan and add the bouillon. Bring back to the boil and stir in all the tom yum paste and garlic and cook for about 2 minutes.
  7. Stir in the lemongrass batons and whole kaffir lime leaves.
  8. Mix in the mushrooms. Add the fish sauce if using and a squeeze of the lime quarters and simmer for another 5 minutes.
  9. Remove from heat, sprinkle in the chopped coriander and basil, and ladle into bowls.

Notes: What does ginger smell like? What will you use the paste for?

Categories: Kitchen Garden, Recipe | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Silverbeet and garam masala soup

Garam is the Hindi word for hot, and masala, spice mixture. We often make our own garam masala blend of ground cumin, coriander, ginger and turmeric, cayenne and mustard seeds at school but it is commonly available in the spice section of any supermarket, already blended.

IMG_0520

Fresh from the garden: silverbeet (Swiss chard), onion, potatoes, garlic, coriander

Recipe source: Melissa

Serves: 6 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Kettle
  • Chopping boards and knives
  • Selection of mixing bowls
  • Paper towel
  • Stockpot
  • Flat-ended wooden spoon
  • Measures: jug, tablespoon, teaspoon
  • Garlic press
  • Ladle
  • Stick blender
  • Serving bowls
Ingredients:

  • 1.5 litres boiling water and 2 tablespoons bouillon (or 1.5 litres vegetable stock)
  • 2 medium potatoes
  • 1 brown onion
  • 4 garlic cloves
  • A large bunch of silverbeet
  • Olive oil
  • A heaped teaspoon garam masala
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • Flaked salt
  • A small handful of coriander

What to do:

  1. Fill the kettle to 1.5 litres and set it to boil.
  2. Wash or scrub the potatoes under running water (but don’t peel!) and then coarsely chop into 2cm cubes.
  3. Peel the onion and slice into two halves, then finely chop. Peel and chop the garlic.
  4. Wash the silverbeet & shake over the sink. Finely chop the silverbeet, using the whole stalk and leaves as well.
  5. Pour olive oil to cover the base of the stockpot and heat over medium heat for 30 seconds. Add the chopped onion and cook on low, stirring every now and then, for 5 minutes and then add the potato and cook for another few minutes.
  6. Add in the garlic, chopped silverbeet and the garam masala and stir together. Cook very gently for a minute until aromatic.
  7. Increase heat to high. Add the 1½ litres of hot water and the 2 tablespoons of bouillon and bring to the boil, then simmer gently, uncovered, for 10 minutes or until the potato is almost tender.
  8. Meanwhile wash and pat the coriander dry and finely chop.
  9. When the soup is ready and the potato is soft, grind a little bit of pepper in too and taste to see if you need to add any extra salt.
  10. Add in the coriander and then blitz the soup with the stick blender until it’s really smooth.
  11. Taste and add more salt if you need to.
  12. Ladle soup among serving bowls and serve!

 Notes: What do is silverbeet also known as? What is in the garam masala blend? Why do potato-based soups need more salt?

Categories: Kitchen Garden, Recipe | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Curried carrot soup with yoghurt and coriander

Curried carrot! The 70’s called and want their recipe back. But just see here how delicious it is…!

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: carrots, onion, garlic, coriander
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 6 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Stick blender & bowl attachment
  • Measures: tablespoons, teaspoons, ¼ teaspoon
  • Kettle
  • Mixing bowls, large, med, small
  • Chopping boards and knives
  • Peelers
  • Graters
  • Stockpot, wooden spoon
  • Scales
  • Ladle
  • Paper towel
  • Scissors
  • Serving bowls
  • Teaspoons

 

Ingredients:

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 onions
  • 4 cloves of garlic
  • Coarse salt and ground pepper
  • 1 litre boiling water
  • 1 tablespoon bouillon
  • 1kg carrots
  • A small handful coriander
  • 100g Greek yoghurt

Curry Powder

  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • 2 teaspoons ground coriander
  • 1 teaspoon ground turmeric
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon mustard seeds
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger

What to do:

  • To make the curry powder: Measure the spices into the small bowl of the stick blender and process to a fine powder.
  • Fill the kettle to the litre mark and set it to boil.
  • Peel and finely chop the onions. Peel and finely chop the garlic cloves.
  • Wash and peel the carrots, then grate them all and reserve in a large bowl.
  • Heat the oil in the large stockpot over medium heat. Add onion, 2 teaspoons of the curry powder blend and a grind of pepper. Cook stirring occasionally until the onion is soft for about 5 minutes. Add in the grated carrots and garlic, stir in and then sweat for 1 few minutes with the lid on and the heat low.
  • Carefully add the boiling water and bouillon and bring to a boil. Reduce heat, cover and simmer for 10 minutes until the carrots are tender.
  • Meanwhile wash the coriander and pat it dry. Finely snip and reserve in a little bowl.
  • Puree the soup using the stick blender until super smooth and then check the seasoning. Weigh the yoghurt and then stir into the soup, creating a big whirl.
  • Ladle into soup bowls and serve garnished with the coriander.

Notes: What do the individual spices of the curry powder smell like? And then how do they smell when they’re all combined?

ourkitchengarden.net

Categories: Kitchen Garden, Recipe | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Ottolenghi’s herb soup

Yotam says, “Herbs are too often the side show, a garnish for the main event. It’s time to put them centre stage. Soft herbs don’t always have to be treated as a garnish – whole bunches of the stuff go into this winning soup.” We say, ” WOW! All this texture and minty flavour in a SOUP?! We love it, even if it does taste a bit freaky!”

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: parsley, coriander, mint, baby spinach, silverbeet, onion, garlic
Recipe source: adapted from Yotam Ottolenghi’s recipe in The Guardian

Equipment:

  • Chopping boards & knives
  • Garlic press
  • Microplane
  • Scales
  • Salad spinner
  • Large stockpot
  • Wooden spoon
  • Handheld (stick) blender
  • Measuring jug
  • Selection of mixing bowls
  • Ladle
  • Bowls to serve

 

Ingredients:

  • 5 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 medium onions
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 2 teaspoons ground turmeric
  • 1 nutmeg
  • 1 tablespoon dried mint
  • 250g baby spinach (we used lambs’ lettuce)
  • 250g silverbeet leaves
  • 25g parsley (leaves and stalks)
  • 25g coriander (leaves and stalks)
  • 1200ml hot water and a large tablespoon of bouillon (or vegetable stock)

To serve

  • 200g Greek yoghurt
  • 10g coriander leaves
  • 10g mint leaves
  • 5g parsley leaves
  • 200g feta
  • Flaked salt and black pepper

What to do:

  • Fill the kettle to 1200ml and set to boil.
  • Peel and roughly chop the onions. Peel and crush the garlic cloves.
  • Grate the nutmeg to yield 1 teaspoon.
  • Wash the baby spinach, silverbeet leaves & main herbs in several changes of water in large bowls & then carefully dry using the salad spinner.
  • Roughly chop the silverbeet leaves, rolling them up like a cigar and slicing. Finely chop the stalks.
  • Heat two tablespoons of the olive oil in the stockpot. Add the onion and sauté GENTLY for around five minutes, or until translucent and soft.
  • Stir in the turmeric, garlic and nutmeg, fry for a minute, then add the dried mint, spinach, silverbeet leaves, the whole parsley and coriander leaves and stalks, and stock.
  • Bring to a simmer and cook for 10 minutes. Season, then blitz the soup with the stick blender until smooth.
  • Meanwhile wash, carefully dry and then finely chop the ‘To Serve’ herbs.
  • Pour the yoghurt into the medium bowl. Whisk a ladleful of hot soup into the yoghurt, stirring constantly, and repeat with a couple more ladles of hot soup, then tip the yoghurt mix into the soup and whisk in.
  • Stir through the chopped herbs and crumble in half of the feta, reserving some leaves and cheese to garnish. Adjust the seasoning to taste.
  • Pour into soup bowls, sprinkle over the herbs and remaining feta, and finish with a little drizzle of olive oil.

Notes: How many herbs can you think of? What is feta? What does nutmeg small like? What was turmeric used for historically? What is silverbeet also known as?

ourkitchengarden.net

Categories: Kitchen Garden, Recipe | Tags: , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Sharon’s broccoli soup

Sharon is my very good friend who cooks this soup for her kids, and mine too when they stay over. It was the first soup ever that my children specifically requested! Happy birthday Mrs!

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: broccoli, potatoes, spring onions, basil
Recipe source: adapted from a recipe by Sharon Quill
Serves: 6 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Kettle
  • Chopping boards & knives
  • Mixing bowls
  • Colander
  • Salad spinner
  • Large stockpot
  • Wooden spoon
  • Measures: tablespoon
  • Scales
  • Handheld mixer
  • Ladle
  • Serving bowls
Ingredients:

  • 1.5 litres water & 1.5 tablespoons bouillon (or 1.5lt stock)
  • 500g waxy potatoes
  • A large onion
  • 4 spring onions
  • A large head broccoli & leaves
  • 4 garlic cloves
  • 25g unsalted butter
  • 2 bay leaves
  • A bunch of basil (or ready-made pesto)
  • Flaked salt and black pepper

What to do:

  • Fill the kettle up to the 1.5 litre mark and set to boil.
  • Wash and scrub potatoes & cut into 2cm cubes – do not peel. Peel and finely chop the onion.
  • Wash and trim spring onions, removing & discarding the tough outer layer. Slice into 1cm bits.
  • Wash the broccoli & shake dry. Cut off the florets leaving them walnut-sized, and chop up the stems into pieces about 1cm cubes, trimming off any hard edges. Strip any leaves from the stalks (discarding the stalks) and slice the leaves into strips.
  • Peel garlic cloves and finely slice.
  • Meltthe butter in the large stockpot over medium heat and gently sauté the chopped onion and spring onion for 2 minutes.
  • Add potato, garlic and bay leaves and turn with the wooden spoon so that the potato sweats in the butter. Add the hot water and bouillon or stock, bring to the boil then cover and simmer over low heat for 10 minutes.
  • Meanwhile, if you’re using fresh basil, pick the basil leaves from the stalks and wash them, then spin dry. Using your fingers, tear them into smaller pieces.
  • After the potatoes have simmered for 10 minutes, add the broccoli and cook for another 5 minutes. Remove the bay leaves and turn heat off. Drop the torn basil leaves, if using, into the soup or dollop in a tablespoon or two of pesto.
  • With dry hands, plug in the handheld mixer and carefully whizz the soup until it is silky smooth. Add salt to taste and a good grind of pepper and ladle into bowls to serve.

Notes: What is bouillon and where do we keep it? Why do we tear the basil with our fingers?

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Carrot soup with lemon tahini and crisped chickpeas

Carrot soup seems to go down a treat with our kids, and this one is super-special with a wonderful lemony dollop and also some crunch from roasted chickpeas.

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: carrots, onion, garlic, parsley, lemon
Recipe source: adapted from a recipe by Deb Perelman on smittenkitchen.com
Serves: 6 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Kettle
  • Peelers
  • Chopping boards and knives
  • Large stockpot
  • Measures: tablespoon, teaspoon, ½ teaspoon
  • Baking tray and paper
  • Colander
  • Mixing bowls – selection
  • Citrus juicer
  • Salad spinner
  • Stick blender
  • Ladle
  • Serving bowls

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ingredients:

  • 1.5 litres boiling water with 2 tablespoons of bouillon (or 1.5 litres vegetable stock)
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1kg carrots
  • 1 large onion
  • 4 garlic cloves
  • A teaspoon ground coriander
  • A teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon table salt, plus more if needed
  • Pinch of chilli flakes
  • A small handful flat leaf parsley

Crisped chickpeas

  • 400g tin of chickpeas
  • 1 generous tablespoon olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon coarse salt

Lemon-tahini dollop

  • 3 tablespoons tahini paste
  • A lemon
  • Pinch or two of salt
  • 2 tablespoons water

What to do:

  • Fill the kettle with cold water to the 1.5 litre mark and set it to boil. Preheat the oven to 220C.
  • Wash and peel carrots and dice into small cubes. Peel and finely chop the onion. Smash and peel the garlic cloves.
  • Heat two tablespoons olive oil in the large pot over medium heat. Add the onion and sauté gently for 5 minutes, then add the carrots, garlic, coriander, cumin and chilli flakes and cook until they begin to brown, about 5 minutes.
  • Once vegetables have begun to brown, add the hot water and bouillon (or stock), using it to scrape up any bits stuck to the bottom of the pot. Cover pot with lid and simmer until carrots are tender, stirring occasionally, about 15 minutes.

To make the chickpeas:

  • Meanwhile, line the tray with baking paper. Drain the chickpeas and then pat dry on paper towels and pop into a large bowl. Toss chickpeas with the olive oil, salt and cumin until they’re all coated. Spread them on the tray and roast them in the oven until they’re browned and crisp. This can take anywhere from 10 to 20 minutes, depending on the size and firmness of your chickpeas. Toss them occasionally to make sure they’re toasting evenly.

To make the lemon tahini:

  • Meanwhile cut the lemon in half and juice to yield 2 tablespoons. In a small dish, whisk together the juice, tahini, salt and water until smooth with a yogurt-like consistency. If more liquid is needed to thin it, you can add more lemon juice or water, a spoonful at a time, until you get your desired consistency.

To finish:

  • Wash and spin-dry the parsley. Pick the leaves from the stalks and chop.
  • Puree soup with the stick blender until smooth. Taste to check seasoning, then ladle into bowls. Dollop each with lemon-tahini, sprinkle with crisped chickpeas and garnish with chopped parsley. 

Notes: Carrot and cumin goes well together. What other classic combinations can you think of?

Categories: Kitchen Garden, Recipe | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Bush tucker: Barilla bower spinach and sweetcorn soup

This is a wonderful soup, full of gingery goodness! We were lucky enough to get some fresh organic turmeric that added quite a savoury aspect to the soup, and stained everything bright yellow, including fingers!

ourkitchengarden.net

Foraged bush tucker food: Barilla bower spinach
Recipe source: adapted from a Javanese recipe on riverford.co.uk
Serves: 6 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Kettle
  • Chopping boards & knives
  • Peelers
  • Garlic press
  • Microplane
  • Mixing bowls
  • Colander
  • Stockpot
  • Measures: jug, tablespoon, teaspoon
  • Serving bowls
Ingredients:

  • 1.5 litres water
  • 1.5 tablespoons bouillon
  • 2 onions
  • 4 cloves garlic
  • 2cm piece of galangal
  • 2cm piece of ginger
  • 2 fresh corn cobs
  • 2 large handfuls Barilla spinach
  • 1cm piece of fresh turmeric
  • Rice Bran oil
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 teaspoon brown sugar
  • Flaked salt & pepper

What to do:

  • Fill the kettle and set it to boil. Peel and finely chop the onions. Peel and mince the garlic.
  • Peel the galangal, turmeric and ginger and carefully grate using the microplane.
  • Peel the silks from the corn cobs and wash the cobs. Cut in half across the middle and then, keeping the flat side on the chopping board, carefully slice off the kernels with a small sharp knife.
  • Wash the Barilla spinach in a big bowl and several changes of cold water, drain in the colander then roughly chop.
  • Drizzle roughly 2 tablespoons of oil into the stockpot and heat on medium. Fry off the onion gently for 3 minutes, stirring, then add the garlic, ginger and turmeric and cook for 30 seconds.
  • Add the hot water and bouillon, turmeric, bay leaf and brown sugar and simmer for 5 minutes, covered.
  • Add the corn and simmer for 5 minutes, partially covered, until the corn is tender.
  • Add the spinach and taste to check if you need any more seasoning.
  • Ladle into bowls and serve.

Notes: What is Barilla bower spinach like and where does it grow? What is turmeric and what does it look like?

Categories: Kitchen Garden, Recipe | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: