Posts Tagged With: Rice

Broccoli and lemon myrtle risotto

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This lovely risotto is textural and beautifully herby – especially with the subtle lemony tang of the lemon myrtle leaves – and very easy once you get past all the stirring! Serve just before eating while it’s still slightly soupy.

Foraged bush tucker: lemon myrtle leaves
Recipe source: Melissa Moore
Serves: 6 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Saucepan
  • Measures: scales, jug, cup, ¼ cup, tablespoon
  • Salad spinner
  • Garlic press
  • Mixing bowls
  • Chopping boards & knives
  • Grater & microplane zester
  • Ladle
  • Wooden spoon with a straight end
  • Heavy based stockpot
  • 4 soup plates or bowls to serve
Ingredients:

  • 1.5 litres water with 2 tablespoons bouillon (or 1 litre stock)
  • 3 lemon myrtle leaves
  • 1 brown onion
  • 3 garlic cloves
  • 1 large stalk broccoli
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 20g butter
  • 300g Arborio rice
  • 40g parmesan or grana padano
  • A small handful marjoram
  • Flaked salt & black pepper

What to do:

  1. Pour the water and bouillon into a saucepan, and bring it to a boil. When boiling, turn down to bare simmer and add the lemon myrtle leaves.
  2. Peel and finely chop the onion. Squeeze the garlic cloves through the press into a small bowl.
  3. Wash the broccoli & shake dry. Chop the stems into ½ cm pieces and add stems to the stock, reserving the florets. Wash the leaves, strip from the stalks and finely slice the leaves.
  4. Heat the olive oil and butter over medium heat in the stockpot. Add the chopped onion and cook gently for about three minutes until translucent but not brown. Add the garlic and cook gently for another few seconds.
  5. Stir in the rice until the grains separate and begin to crackle.
  6. Begin adding the simmering stock, a ladle at a time, and stir in. The stock should just cover the rice and bubble. Stir every minute or so for about 15 minutes.
  7. After about 10 minutes, add the broccoli florets & sliced leaves to the rice and keep stirring for about another 5 minutes. When the rice is just tender all the way through but still slightly firm, usually in about 20 minutes all up, it is done.
  8. Meanwhile, weigh and cut the parmesan & grate it. Wash and spin dry the marjoram, strip and discard the stems.
  9. Add the last ladleful of stock and the rest of the broccolini in to the rice. Stir in the marjoram and parmesan, and remove from the heat. Taste now and check the seasoning. The mixture should be creamy and lose.
  10. Serve into the bowls and eat right away!

Notes: What sort of rice is Arborio? Why do we use this sort of rice? Why do we fry the rice off first? What does ‘yield’ mean? What do lemon myrtle leaves look like?

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Nasi Goreng

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Nasi Goreng would have to be Indonesia’s most famous dish. It can be cooked with chicken, prawns and bacon as well as this veggie version, but always has kecap manis for that sweet kick!

From the garden: shallots, carrot, bean sprouts, celery, cabbage, garlic, eggs
Recipe source: Melissa, Kitchen Specialist at Bondi PS
Serves: 4 at home or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Kettle
  • Large saucepan
  • Baking tray to fit in fridge
  • Chopping boards & knives
  • Mixing bowls
  • Colander
  • Large wok & non-stick frying pan
  • Peeler
  • Measures: cup, tablespoon
  • Scales
  • Foil
  • Plate & egg slice
  • Serving bowls
Ingredients:

  • 2 cups white long grain rice
  • Rice Bran oil
  • Cooking salt
  • 5 shallots
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 1 carrot
  • 1 celery stick
  • 40g Chinese cabbage
  • 80g bean sprouts
  • 2 tablespoons fried shallots
  • 2 tablespoons kecap manis
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 4 eggs

What to do:

  1. Fill the kettle with at least 3 cups of water and set it to boil. Heat a tablespoon of oil in the large saucepan, add the 2 cups of rice and a pinch of salt and stir to heat. When the kettle has boiled, carefully measure 3 cups of water into the rice and stir again. Bring to the boil, the turn down to a simmer, put the lid on and cook for 14 minutes, setting the timer. When done, turn it off and leave for a few minutes with the lid on. Then fluff it up and spoon out into a tray and put in the fridge to cool completely. This rice will be used in the NEXT lesson, and your rice to use now will be in the fridge.
  2. Peel and thinly slice the garlic and shallots. Wash the carrot and celery stick. Peel the carrot and finely dice them both. Wash the cabbage and finely slice into thin shreds. Wash and drain the bean sprouts.
  3. Line the wok with oil, then heat over a low setting. Add the shallots and garlic, and stir-fry for a minute, then add the carrot and celery and stir-fry for 3 minutes until carrot is tender.
  4. Add the cabbage and stir-fry for 3 minutes until the cabbage wilts. Add cold rice, bean sprouts, half the fried shallots, the kecap manis and soy sauce. Stir-fry for 2 minutes or until heated through. Transfer to a large bowl. Cover with foil to keep warm.
  5. Heat a large non-stick frying pan over medium-high heat. Crack 2 eggs into the pan and cook, uncovered, for 2 minutes or until the white sets and the yolk is almost set (for a soft yolk) or until cooked to your liking. Transfer to a plate and repeat with remaining eggs.
  6. Spoon nasi goreng into shallow serving bowls. Top each with a fried egg and sprinkle over remaining fried shallots. Serve immediately.

Notes: What does Nasi Goreng mean? What is kecap manis? Why do we use the rice from the class before?

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Bush tucker: Broccolini and lemon myrtle risotto

This lovely risotto is textural and beautifully herby, and very easy once you get past all the stirring! Serve just before eating while it’s still soupy.

ourkitchengarden.net

Foraged bush tucker food: lemon myrtle leaves
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 6 or 24 tastes

 

Equipment:

  • Saucepan
  • Measures: scales, jug, cup, ¼ cup, tablespoon
  • Salad spinner
  • Garlic press
  • Mixing bowls
  • Chopping boards & knives
  • Grater & microplane zester
  • Ladle
  • Wooden spoon with a straight end
  • Heavy based stockpot
  • 4 soup plates or bowls to serve

 

 

Ingredients:

  • 2 litres water with 2 tablespoons bouillon (or 2 litres stock)
  • 1 brown onion
  • 3 fresh lemon myrtle leaves
  • A small handful marjoram
  • 3 garlic cloves
  • 1 handful broccolini & leaves
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 20g butter
  • 400g Arborio rice
  • 50g parmesan
  • Flaked salt & black pepper

What to do:

  • Pour the water and bouillon into a saucepan, and bring it to a boil. When boiling, turn down to bare simmer and add the lemon myrtle leaves.
  • Peel and finely chop the onion. Squeeze the garlic cloves through the press into a small bowl.
  • Wash the broccolini & shake dry. Chop the stems into ½ cm pieces and add stems to the stock, reserving the florets. Wash the leaves, strip from the stalks and finely slice the leaves.
  • Heat the olive oil and butter over medium heat in the stockpot. Add the chopped onion and cook gently for about three minutes until translucent but not brown. Add the garlic and cook gently for another few seconds.
  • Stir in the rice until the grains separate and begin to crackle.
  • Begin adding the simmering stock, a ladle at a time, and stir in. The stock should just cover the rice and bubble. Stir every minute or so for about 15 minutes.
  • After about 10 minutes, add the broccoli florets & sliced leaves to the rice and keep stirring for about another 5 minutes. When the rice is just tender all the way through but still slightly firm, usually in about 20 minutes all up, it is done.
  • Meanwhile, weigh and cut the parmesan & grate it. Wash and spin dry the marjoram, strip and discard the stems.
  • Add the last ladleful of stock and the rest of the broccolini in to the rice. Stir in the marjoram and parmesan, and remove from the heat. Taste now and check the seasoning. The mixture should be creamy and lose.
  • Serve into the bowls and eat right away!

Notes: What sort of rice is Arborio? Why do we use this sort of rice? Why do we fry the rice off first? What does ‘yield’ mean? What do lemon myrtle leaves smell like?

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Risi e bisi

This soupy rice and peas dish originating in Venice amounts on the plate to so much more than its simple name suggests. Make sure you retain the pods of your peas as they are incorporated in.

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: shelling peas, sugar snaps, onions
Recipe source: adapted from a recipe  by Stevie Parle on telegraph.co.uk
Serves: 6 or 24 tastes

Equipment:
  • Mixing bowls, 5 mixed size
  • Scales
  • Measures – jug, tablespoon
  • Chopping boards and knife
  • Large stockpot & smaller saucepan
  • Large spoon
  • Stick blender with small blending bowl attachment
  • Spatula
  • Ladle
  • Sieve
  • Wooden spoon
  • Grater
  • Serving bowls

Ingredients:

  • 300g peas (combination of freshly podded, frozen and sugar snaps)
  • 1½ litres water
  • 2 onions
  • 75g butter
  • Olive oil
  • Flaked salt & black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons bouillon
  • 300g Arborio rice
  • 75g parmigiano or grana padano

What to do:

  • Pod the fresh peas, keeping the peas and pods in separate bowls.Wash the sugar snaps, de-string and slice in half or into thirds. Weigh the peas and sugar snaps and then add frozen peas to make up the remainder of the 300g.
  • Measure the water into the smaller of the saucepans and set it to boil. Peel and finely chop the onions.
  • Melt the butter with a splash of oil in a nice big saucepan or stockpot over a low heat. Add the onions and a pinch of salt and gently fry until very soft but not coloured (about 15 minutes).
  • Meanwhile, add the bouillon and the pea pods (not the peas) to the boiling water in the smaller saucepan and boil hard for at least 10 minutes until soft.
  • Stir all the peas and the rice into the onions and season well. Make sure everything is nicely coated in the butter, then add the reserved stock, gradually bringing it to the boil and stirring gently. Turn the heat down low so that it is gently simmering and leave it to bubble away, stirring occasionally until the rice is just cooked and the peas are soft (about 20 minutes).
  • When the 10 minutes is up for the smaller saucepan, carefully using the large spoon, scoop out the solids to the blending bowl of the stick blender, with a small amount of liquid. Blend them until you have a slightly stringy paste, then pass through the sieve so you have a purée. Add a splash of oil and a little seasoning and put to one side.
  • Grate the parmesan. After the 20 minutes are up for the stockpot, stir in the purée and parmesan, check the seasoning, and add a little more stock or hot water if the consistency is not soupy enough (you should need a spoon to eat it) then spoon into bowls and serve.

Notes: How many peas are in a pod? What does risi e bisi mean?

ourkitchengarden.net

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Risotto primavera

This lovely spring risotto is positively bursting with green goodies!

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: broad beans, green beans, marjoram, garlic, onion, pea shoot tendrils
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 6 at home or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Saucepans – small, medium and large stockpot
  • Salad spinner
  • Bowls – 1 large, small, med
  • Large knife& chopping board
  • Grater, microplane zester
  • Ladle
  • Wooden spoon with a flat end
  • Heavy based stockpot
  • Measures: scales, jug, cup, tablespoon
  • 4 bowls or soup plates to serve

 

Ingredients:

  • 2 litres water with 2 tablespoons bouillon (or 2 litres stock)
  • 3 garlic cloves
  • 1 brown onion
  • 20g butter
  • Extra-virgin olive oil
  • 400g Arborio rice
  • A handful broad beans
  • A bunch of asparagus
  • A handful of green beans
  • A cup of frozen peas
  • 1 lemon
  • 50g parmesan
  • A small handful marjoram
  • A handful pea shoot tendrils

What to do:

  • Measure 2 litres of water into the medium saucepan, add the bouillon and bring it to a simmer on medium heat.
  • Peel and finely chop the onion and garlic.
  • Heat the butter and 2 tablespoons of olive oil and butter over medium heat in the large stockpot. Add the chopped onion and cook until translucent & then stir in the garlic and then rice until the grains begin to crackle.
  • Begin adding the simmering stock, a ladle at a time, and stir in until fully absorbed. The stock should just cover the rice and bubble. Stir every minute or so, making sure you get into all the edges of the pan with the wooden spoon.
  • Meanwhile fill the smaller saucepan with water and set to boil. Pod the broad beans and boil for 3 minutes. Drain, refresh in a bowl of cold water and pod again. Reserve in a small bowl.
  • Wash and chop the asparagus into 1cm lengths. Measure out the peas from the freezer and reserve. Wash and snip the beans into 1cm lengths.
  • After about 15 minutes add all the peas, the broad beans, the green beans and the asparagus and stir in, cooking for another 5 minutes.
  • Meanwhile, zest the lemon and grate the parmesan to yield about ½ cup. Wash and gently spin the pea shoots dry. Wash, spin and strip the marjoram leaves.
  • When the rice is just tender all the way through but still slightly firm, usually in about 20 minutes, it is done.
  • When you are ready to serve, add in a last ladleful of stock. Stir in the pea shoots, lemon zest and parmesan, and remove from the heat. Taste now and check the seasoning. The mixture should be creamy.
  • Serve onto the bowls and eat right away!

ourkitchengarden.net

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Mushroom and kale risotto

This lovely risotto is textural and beautifully herby, and very easy once you get past all the stirring! Feel free to experiment with different types of mushies too. And if you have any left over then go crazy making arancini!

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: mushrooms, Tuscan kale (cavolo nero), marjoram, garlic, onion
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 8 at home or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Saucepan
  • Salad spinner
  • Garlic press
  • Bowls – 1 large, small, med
  • Large knife& chopping board
  • Grater & microplane zester
  • Ladle
  • Wooden spoon with a flat end
  • Heavy based stockpot
  • Measures:scales, jug, cup, tablespoon
  • 4 bowls or soup plates to serve

 

Ingredients:

  • 2 litres water with 2 tablespoons bouillon (or 2 litres stock)
  • A large handful of mushrooms
  • A small handful marjoram
  • 4 or 5 kale leaves
  • 3 garlic cloves
  • 1 brown onion
  • Extra-virgin olive oil
  • 20g butter
  • 400g Arborio rice
  • 1 lemon
  • 50g parmesan
  • Flaked salt & black pepper

What to do:

  • Measure the water into the saucepan, add the bouillon and bring it to a simmer on medium heat.
  • Meanwhile wipe the dirt from the mushrooms with a piece of paper towel, trim any ugly bits and then thinly slice the mushrooms.
  • Wash and spin dry the marjoram, strip and discard the stems. Wash the kale leaves, trim from the stalks and finely slice into ribbons.
  • Squeeze the garlic cloves through the press into a small bowl. Peel and finely chop the onion.
  • Heat half the butter and 2 tablespoons of olive oil and butter over medium heat in the stockpot. Add half the chopped onion and cook gently until just tender, about three minutes. Do not brown. Add the mushrooms and garlic and a pinch of flaked salt and sauté for 3 or 4 minutes until the mushrooms are starting to colour. Remove from the pan and reserve in a medium bowl.
  • Heat the rest of the butter and another 2 tablespoons of olive oil in the same pan & then add the rest of the onions. Cook until translucent & then stir in the rice until the grains begin to crackle.
  • Begin adding the simmering stock, a ladle at a time, and stir in until fully absorbed. The stock should just cover the rice and bubble. Add the kale, and stir every minute or so for about 15 minutes, making sure you get into all the corners of the pan with the wooden spoon.
  • Meanwhile, zest the lemon and grate the parmesan to yield about ½ cup.
  • After about 15 minutes, add the mushrooms backto the rice and keep stirring for about another 5 minutes. When the rice is just tender all the way through but still slightly firm, usually in about 20 minutes, it is done.
  • When you are ready to serve, add in a last ladleful of stock. Stir in the marjoram, lemon zest and parmesan, and remove from the heat. Taste now and check the seasoning. The mixture should be creamy.
  • Serve onto the soup plates and eat right away!

 

 

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Perfect steamed rice!

So many fantastic home cooks I know are scared of rice! When it comes to steaming you really don’t need a rice cooker (unless you’re cooking for 100 people!) as a simple saucepan will do the job perfectly…

ourkitchengarden.net

Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 8 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Measures – cup
  • Large saucepan & lid
  • Sieve
  • Knife
  • Serving bowl or small bowl and plates
Ingredients:

  • 3 cups jasmine or basmati rice
  • 4 cups cold water

What to do:

  • Measure the rice grains into the saucepan. Wash the rice with cold running water and swish with your hands. Drain carefully into a sieve and repeat 3 more times until the water is no longer milky. This helps remove excess starch and cleans the grains.
  • Empty the washed rice back into the pot and add the 4 cups of cold water. Turn the heat to high – when the water in the pot starts to bubble, stir then cover the pot and reduce heat to the lowest flame. Simmer for 15 minutes without disturbing.
  • After the 15 minutes is up, just turn off the heat without disturbing the saucepan. Just let it sit with the lid on for 5 minutes to finish the steaming process.
  • Using a knife, transfer the rice into a large serving bowl, fluffing as you go. Serve in one bowl, or alternatively cram spoonfuls of rice into a small deep bowl  – just rinsed & wet – until full and level, then place bowl upside-down onto a plate, tap and pull off the bowl leaving a bowl-shaped rice mound!

Notes: Where does rice come from? How is it grown? What other dishes can you make with rice?

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