Posts Tagged With: Mothers’ Day

Cheese and spring onion souffles

This classic comfort food recipe has appeared on this blog in a slightly different version of two cheeses souffle – but this version with spring onions has gone down a treat, even if we do say so ourselves…

Fresh from the garden: eggs, spring onion
Recipe source: adapted from a recipe on bbcgoodfood.com
Serves: 5 at home or 25 tastes

ourkitchengarden.net

Equipment:

  • 5 x 250ml ramekins or soufflé dishes
  • Baking paper & string
  • Scissors
  • Baking tray
  • Scales
  • Paper towel, pot holders
  • Bowls – 1 large, 5 small
  • Saucepan
  • Wooden spoon
  • Measuring jug
  • Stand mixer and bowl
  • Metal spoon
  • 4 under-plates to serve
Ingredients:

  • 25g butter plus extra to grease the ramekins
  • 100g feta cheese
  • 100g parmesan
  • 2 or 3 spring onions
  • 5 eggs
  • 25g flour
  • 250ml milk
  • Flaked salt & black pepper

What to do:

  • Heat the oven to 200C. Butter the ramekins.
  • Make a collar for each ramekin by tearing a 40cm length of baking paper, folding it into thirds, and buttering one side. Then roll it around the ramekin, buttered side in, and tying with string to secure. Place them on the baking tray when done.
  • Measure the parmesan, then grate it. Crumble the feta cheese.
  • Wash the spring onions and pat dry with paper towel. Strip off the tough outer layer and trim the roots and tops. Finely chop them into thin discs to yield about 2 tablespoons.
  • Carefully separate each of the eggs, putting the whites into the very clean and dry bowl of the stand mixer, and reserving the yolks in a small bowl.
  • Melt 25g butter in the saucepan, stir in the flour and gently cook on a low heat for a minute or so. Slowly add the milk, stirring all the time to make a thick sauce. Cook for a couple of minutes to cook out the flour.
  • Stir in the cheeses and spring onions then add 4 of the egg yolks, season generously and mix well.
  • Whisk the egg whites until they are stiff and form soft peaks.
  • Using a metal spoon, start folding the egg whites into the cheese mixture carefully – begin by using about 1/3 of the whites first and then adding the rest once combined – and pour into the buttered soufflé dishes.
  • Cook for 12–15 minutes until the soufflés are risen and golden.
  • Using pot holders, carefully place a soufflé on to an lined underplate and serve TOUT SUITE!

Notes: What is a ramekin? Why do we separate the egg yolks and whites? Why do we need to cook out the flour? Where does the word soufflé come from?

ourkitchengarden.net

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Pumpkin gnocchi with burnt butter and sage

Don’t be put off thinking that these gnocchi are too hard to make! The trick here is to lightly knead the dough so that the gnocchi too are light… super-yum! And once you’ve had a go you will NEVER buy packaged gnocchi ever again! The crispy sage is a big hit too – get the kids to have a smell of the savoury and almost meaty sage leaves, and then compare after the leaves have sizzled in the butter…

And if you’re interested in the gluten-free version, see below!*

ourkitchengarden.net

Pumpkin gnocchi, burnt butter and sage

Fresh from the garden: potatoes, pumpkin, sage
Recipe source: adapted from a recipe by Stephanie Alexander, Kitchen Garden Cooking W/ Kids
Serves: 6-8 or about 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Ovenproof serving dishes
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Peelers, grater, scales
  • Medium saucepan
  • Wok & steamer basket
  • Bowls – med, small
  • Skewer, colander
  • Baking tray, Mouli food mill
  • Measures – tablespoon
  • Pastry scraper, slotted spoon
  • Frying pan with 5cm sides
  • Non-stick frying pan
Ingredients:

  • 500g potatoes (use Nicola or Desiree)
  • Cooking salt
  • 600g pumpkin (use a dry-fleshed variety, such as butternut)
  • 320g plain flour, plus extra for dusting
  • 80g Parmesan
  • 20 large sage leaves
  • 150g butter
  • Ground nutmeg
  • Flaked salt and freshly ground black pepper
ourkitchengarden.net

Gnocchi ready for the pan

What to do:

  • Preheat the oven to 120C and place serving dishes in the oven to keep warm. Peel the potatoes, cut into chunks, then place in a saucepan with a teaspoon ofcooking salt and enough cold water to cover generously. Bring to the boil and cook for 15 minutes.
  • Peel and seed the pumpkin. Weigh to make sure you have 500g and cut into bite-sized chunks. Place a wok over a high heat and pour in enough hot water to come a third of the way up the sides. Rest a bamboo steamer on top and spread the pumpkin cubes out in it; cover and steam for 10 minutes. Set the pumpkin aside. Meanwhile weigh the parmesan and grate.
  • Check the potatoes are tender with a skewer then drain, return to the saucepan, shake over the heat to dry out and tip into a bowl. In a separate, small bowl, place the flour. Set this aside until needed.
  • Lightly flour the workbench and the baking tray, and have the measured flour close by. Squash the pumpkin and potato through the coarsest disc of the food mill to form a loose mound on the bench. Sprinkle with a good pinch of flaked salt. Sieve most of the flour over the vegetable mound and, quickly but lightly, combine. Knead briefly until the dough is smooth, using a little more flour if necessary.
  • Cut the dough into four pieces and, with your fingers, roll each into a sausage 2-3cm wide. Cut each “sausage” into pieces 2cm long and place on the floured baking tray.
  • Fill a high-sided frying pan with water, add a teaspoon of salt and bring to the boil. Drop in as many gnocchi as will fit easily in a layer. Adjust the heat to a simmer. When the gnocchi rise to the surface (about three minutes), lift out with a slotted spoon, drain well and slip into the warmed serving dishes. Return to the oven after adding each batch of gnocchi. Scatter over the Parmesan and a sprinkle of nutmeg.
  • Spread the sage leaves in the non-stick frying pan and add the butter. Fry until the leaves are crisp and the butter has become a medium-brown colour. Spoon the sage leaves and butter over the gnocchi in the serving dish and add some ground pepper. Place heatproof mats on the tables and serve the gnocchi in the ovenproof dishes.

*Gluten-free note: We took off about 100g of the milled potato and pumpkin mixture and combined it with about 30g gluten-free plain flour, the results were fabulous – check these babies out:

ourkitchengarden.net

Gluten-free pumpkin gnocchi

Categories: Kitchen Garden, Recipe, School Holiday Program | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Apple and cinnamon compote with vanilla yoghurt

This recipe is a goody for Mothers’ Day coming up – imagine your mama waking up to the smell of this bubbling away on the stovetop, just in time for a lazy breakfast-in-bed?! You’ll have brownie points at least for the rest of the day! And if Dad’s making it just for them, tell him to splosh a tablespoon or so of Calvados or Cognac in too…

Fresh from the garden: apples, lemon
Recipe source: Compote adapted from a recipe by Martha Stewart
Serves: 6 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Bowls – large, medium
  • Colander
  • Peelers
  • Chopping board & knives
  • Citrus juicer
  • Large saucepan
  • Wooden spoon
  • Measures – scales, jug, ¼ cup, tablespoon
  • Spatula
  • Small sauce bowls
  • Serving bowls & plates
Ingredients:

  • 1.5kg apples, such as Granny Smith or Pink Lady
  • 1/2 a lemon
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • A cinnamon quill
  • 2 cloves
  • 200ml Greek yoghurt
  • 1 vanilla pod
  • 1 tablespoon caster sugar

What to do:

  • Wash the apples, then peel them, cut into quarters and then carefully cut out the inner core. You may need to ask an adult to help. Discard the cores into the compost, then chop the remaining pieces into 2cm cubes. Put the cubes into the saucepan.
  • Cut the lemon in half and juice one half to yield 2 tablespoons, measuring them into the saucepan.
  • Combine the rest of the ingredients into the saucepan. Cover, and cook over low heat, stirring occasionally, until the apples are tender, about 20 minutes.
  • Meanwhile prepare the yoghurt: halve the vanilla pod lengthways and scrape the seeds from inside each half. Mix these into the yoghurt with the tablespoon of white caster sugar, and divide into small sauce bowls. Chill until ready to serve.
  • When the compote is ready, divide it among your serving bowls. Place the bowls on a serving plate with the small yoghurt bowl and serve!

Notes: What are cloves – are they garlic? What is Greek yoghurt? What could you add to this dish to make it even yummier? What is a compote?

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Mushroom and rocket frittate

We love eggs! They are so versatile… and we also love the magic combination of eggs with mushrooms… this recipe has heaps of different things to do so great for budding chefs! The original also calls for spinach but we had heaps of rocket to use instead – the pepperiness isn’t so obvious once the rocket has wilted…

Fresh from the garden: spring onions, mushrooms, rocket, thyme, eggs
Recipe source: adapted from a recipe by Martha Stewart
Serves: 12 frittate or about 30 small

Equipment:

  • Muffin tins (12-hole large or 2 x 24-hole mini)
  • Pastry brush
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Bowls – large, medium
  • Salad spinner
  • Large frying pan
  • Wooden spoon
  • Whisk, spoons
  • Scales
  • Serving plates
Ingredients:

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil plus extra for greasing
  • 2 spring onions
  • 300g mushrooms of your choice!
  • 300g fresh rocket
  • A sprig or two of thyme
  • A good grind of pepper
  • 1 pinch flaked salt
  • 8 eggs
  • 1/3 cup milk
  • 100g feta cheese

 

What to do:

  • Preheat the oven to 180C. Lightly grease the muffin tin holes with a pastry brush and a teaspoon or 2 of olive oil.
  • Wash the spring onions, stripping the first layer off and trimming any dried-up ugly parts.  Thinly slice the white & green parts but keep them in separate bowls.
  • Wipe the mushrooms with a piece of paper towel – do not wash them! Slice finely.
  • Wash and spin-dry the rocket. Roll it up & slice into thin ribbons.
  • Wash and wipe the thyme dry, then strip from the stalks.
  • In the frying pan, heat oil over medium-high heat; cook the white parts of spring onions, stirring for 1 minute. Add the mushrooms, thyme, pepper and salt and cook on a low heat, stirring occasionally until no liquid remains and mushrooms are light golden for about 5 minutes.
  • Stir in the rocket and cook, stirring, until wilted for about 1 minute. Remove from heat and then stir in the green parts of green onions. Divide among the muffin cups and set aside.
  • Break the eggs into a large bowl and whisk lightly, then add the milk and beat again. Spoon the egg mixture evenly among muffin cups. Weigh the feta cheese & then crumble it up and then sprinkle into each hole.
  • Bake in 180C oven until edges are set, about 10 minutes for the large (or 7-8 minutes for the small) then let cool in pan on rack for a few minutes.
  • Divide among serving plates. Yum!

Notes: Why do we separate the spring onion parts? Why shouldn’t we wash mushrooms?What does thyme smell like? Where does the word frittate come from?

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Rhubarb and pear compote with vanilla yoghurt

This recipe is a goody for Mothers’ Day coming up – imagine your mama waking up to the smell of this bubbling away on the stovetop, just in time for a lazy breakfast-in-bed?! You’ll have brownie points at least for the rest of the day!

ourkitchengarden.net

Rhubarb and pear compote, vanilla yoghurt

Fresh from the garden: orange, rhubarb, pears
Recipe source: adapted from a recipe by Tracy Rutherford in Australian Good Taste
Serves: 6 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Paper towel
  • Microplane zester
  • Chopping board & knives
  • Bowls – large, medium, small
  • Measures – ¼ cup, tablespoon
  • Peelers
  • Large saucepan
  • Wooden spoon
  • Colander
  • Spatula
  • Small sauce bowls
  • Serving bowls & plates
Ingredients:

  • 1 orange
  • 1/4 cup caster sugar
  • 1 bunch (about 700g) rhubarb
  • 4 ripe pears
  • 1 cinnamon stick

Vanilla yoghurt

  • 200ml Greek yoghurt
  • 1 vanilla pod
  • 1 tablespoon caster sugar

 What to do:

  • Wash and wipe the orange dry. Zest into a small bowl, then cut the orange in half and then juice to yield ¼ cup.
  • Trim the rhubarb, discarding the leaves into the rubbish (not the compost). Wash well, then chop into 3cm lengths.
  • Wash the pears and peel. Slice into quarters and then cut out the core. Slice the wedges in half again.
  • Place the orange juice and sugar in a large saucepan over low heat. Cook, stirring occasionally, for 3 minutes or until sugar dissolves.
  • Add the rhubarb, pear, orange zest and cinnamon stick. Bring to a simmer and cook, covered, for 5 minutes. Uncover and cook for a further 5 minutes or until fruit is tender and liquid thickens slightly. Remove from heat and set aside for 15 minutes to cool.
  • Meanwhile prepare the yoghurt: halve the vanilla pod lengthways and scrape the seeds from inside each half. Mix these into the yoghurt with the tablespoon of white caster sugar, and divide into small sauce bowls. Chill until ready to serve.
  • When the compote is ready, divide it among your serving bowls. Place them on a serving plate with the small yoghurt bowl and serve!

Notes: Why do we discard the rhubarb leaves into the rubbish?  What is Greek yoghurt? What could you sprinkle on to this dish to make it even yummier? What is a compote?

Categories: Kitchen Garden, Recipe, School Holiday Program | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

May 10th 2012

Well what a gorgeous start to the term: late autumn and we’ve got cool nights but warm, sunny days and the rays of sunshine are cascading over the stripy cottage tables and honeyed floorboards… it’s a beautiful place to be!

And with those cool nights my thoughts turn to warming dishes, and being autumn, mushrooms… we’re yet to find a dark enough place to cultivate our own here but I couldn’t let the season go past without experimenting with a mushroom ragu! This we matched with our own hand-rolled bigoli, a long thin pasta, originally from the region of Veneto in Italy. We’ve had discussion in class about this term’s theme in stages one & two: Local Places and Local Environment, as similar pasta is made in other regions but called different names, as pici from Tuscany and stringozzi from Umbria.

Also on the menu this last fortnight has been parmesan polenta with our own poached eggs and crispy sage; garden herb pizza with bocconcini and rocket; the perennial favourite – soup – with spinach, potato and landcress; a truly delicious lemony leaf salad with the last faithful cucumber; and just in time for the Mothers’ Day Tea (as we’re making extra!) some mini frittate of spinach, pumpkin and feta. Delicious!

I’ve been so impressed with all the kitchen classes, but especially 2F who were incredibly self-motivated and able to complete the recipes beautifully without much help at all! And they cleaned up (in every sense!) And thanks to all the wonderful volunteers who have pledged their support again for another term… Our success is all down to you!

And here below are the much-requested recipes for the bigoli with mushroom ragu. Happy Mothers’ Day to all!

Bigoli

Guy Grossi – Recipes From My Mother’s Kitchen

‘Bigoli is a specialty pasta from the northern Italian region of the Veneto. It is similar in shape to spaghetti, but slightly thicker. And unlike other forms of pasta, it includes butter in the dough.’ Other regions in Italy make similar types of noodles too, for example in Umbria they call them stringozzi, and in Tuscany they call them pici.

2 cups plain flour

Pinch salt

100g butter chopped

1 egg

¼ cup milk

 Place flour on a clean workbench and sprinkle with salt. Gently rub in butter until mixture resembles breadcrumbs. Make a well in the centre; add egg and milk, then knead for 10 minutes until smooth.

Flatten out dough, cut into quarters then roll each quarter into a sheet about 3mm thick. Using a pizza cutter, slice into spaghetti-like lengths about 3mm wide, then roll each length between your hands and the workbench so that they’re slightly wider than spaghetti.

Place bigoli on a floured baking tray, cover with a tea towel and set aside.

Cook bigoli in a large saucepan of plenty of salted water until al dente (2 to 3  minutes depending on thickness of pasta), then drain. Add bigoli to sauce and toss to coat.

 Mushroom ragù

Alice Waters – The Art of Simple Food

 1 large onion

1 large carrot

2 celery stalks

6 thyme sprigs

6 parsley sprigs

1 bay leaf

Salt

Extra-virgin olive oil

75g diced tomatoes

900g mushrooms – a mixture of 2 or 3 types

25g butter

100ml cream or crème fraiche

 Wash the carrot, celery and herbs. Spin dry the parsley and thyme, picking their leaves and finely chop the parsley.

Peel the onion & carrot then finely dice them with the celery.

Carefully clean the mushrooms then chop finely.

Heat 2 tablespoons of the olive oil in one of the frying pans and add the onion, carrot, celery and salt and cook over gentle heat until very tender but not browning.

When cooked add the thyme, parsley and bay leaf, and after a minute add the tomatoes.

In the other frying pan heat up another 2 tablespoons of olive oil with the butter and add the mushrooms, sautéing each type until tender and lightly browned.

Once all the mushrooms are cooked, combine with the vegetables and herbs and add the cream and 225ml water or chicken stock.

Bring to a simmer and cook for 15 minutes. Taste for salt and add as needed. Moisten with more liquid if too thick.

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