Posts Tagged With: cinnamon

Apple and cinnamon compote with vanilla yoghurt

This recipe is a goody for Mothers’ Day coming up – imagine your mama waking up to the smell of this bubbling away on the stovetop, just in time for a lazy breakfast-in-bed?! You’ll have brownie points at least for the rest of the day! And if Dad’s making it just for them, tell him to splosh a tablespoon or so of Calvados or Cognac in too…

Fresh from the garden: apples, lemon
Recipe source: Compote adapted from a recipe by Martha Stewart
Serves: 6 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Bowls – large, medium
  • Colander
  • Peelers
  • Chopping board & knives
  • Citrus juicer
  • Large saucepan
  • Wooden spoon
  • Measures – scales, jug, ¼ cup, tablespoon
  • Spatula
  • Small sauce bowls
  • Serving bowls & plates
Ingredients:

  • 1.5kg apples, such as Granny Smith or Pink Lady
  • 1/2 a lemon
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • A cinnamon quill
  • 2 cloves
  • 200ml Greek yoghurt
  • 1 vanilla pod
  • 1 tablespoon caster sugar

What to do:

  • Wash the apples, then peel them, cut into quarters and then carefully cut out the inner core. You may need to ask an adult to help. Discard the cores into the compost, then chop the remaining pieces into 2cm cubes. Put the cubes into the saucepan.
  • Cut the lemon in half and juice one half to yield 2 tablespoons, measuring them into the saucepan.
  • Combine the rest of the ingredients into the saucepan. Cover, and cook over low heat, stirring occasionally, until the apples are tender, about 20 minutes.
  • Meanwhile prepare the yoghurt: halve the vanilla pod lengthways and scrape the seeds from inside each half. Mix these into the yoghurt with the tablespoon of white caster sugar, and divide into small sauce bowls. Chill until ready to serve.
  • When the compote is ready, divide it among your serving bowls. Place the bowls on a serving plate with the small yoghurt bowl and serve!

Notes: What are cloves – are they garlic? What is Greek yoghurt? What could you add to this dish to make it even yummier? What is a compote?

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Categories: Kitchen Garden, Recipe, School Holiday Program | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Rhubarb and pear compote with vanilla yoghurt

This recipe is a goody for Mothers’ Day coming up – imagine your mama waking up to the smell of this bubbling away on the stovetop, just in time for a lazy breakfast-in-bed?! You’ll have brownie points at least for the rest of the day!

ourkitchengarden.net

Rhubarb and pear compote, vanilla yoghurt

Fresh from the garden: orange, rhubarb, pears
Recipe source: adapted from a recipe by Tracy Rutherford in Australian Good Taste
Serves: 6 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Paper towel
  • Microplane zester
  • Chopping board & knives
  • Bowls – large, medium, small
  • Measures – ¼ cup, tablespoon
  • Peelers
  • Large saucepan
  • Wooden spoon
  • Colander
  • Spatula
  • Small sauce bowls
  • Serving bowls & plates
Ingredients:

  • 1 orange
  • 1/4 cup caster sugar
  • 1 bunch (about 700g) rhubarb
  • 4 ripe pears
  • 1 cinnamon stick

Vanilla yoghurt

  • 200ml Greek yoghurt
  • 1 vanilla pod
  • 1 tablespoon caster sugar

 What to do:

  • Wash and wipe the orange dry. Zest into a small bowl, then cut the orange in half and then juice to yield ¼ cup.
  • Trim the rhubarb, discarding the leaves into the rubbish (not the compost). Wash well, then chop into 3cm lengths.
  • Wash the pears and peel. Slice into quarters and then cut out the core. Slice the wedges in half again.
  • Place the orange juice and sugar in a large saucepan over low heat. Cook, stirring occasionally, for 3 minutes or until sugar dissolves.
  • Add the rhubarb, pear, orange zest and cinnamon stick. Bring to a simmer and cook, covered, for 5 minutes. Uncover and cook for a further 5 minutes or until fruit is tender and liquid thickens slightly. Remove from heat and set aside for 15 minutes to cool.
  • Meanwhile prepare the yoghurt: halve the vanilla pod lengthways and scrape the seeds from inside each half. Mix these into the yoghurt with the tablespoon of white caster sugar, and divide into small sauce bowls. Chill until ready to serve.
  • When the compote is ready, divide it among your serving bowls. Place them on a serving plate with the small yoghurt bowl and serve!

Notes: Why do we discard the rhubarb leaves into the rubbish?  What is Greek yoghurt? What could you sprinkle on to this dish to make it even yummier? What is a compote?

Categories: Kitchen Garden, Recipe, School Holiday Program | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Herbal tisane

ourkitchengarden.net

Alice says, ‘A tisane is a fresh tea, an infusion of fragrant herbs, or flowers or spices, in boiling water. It is a soothing a refreshing finish to a meal, is complementary to most desserts, and offers a mild alternative to coffee. Tisane can be made from such flavourings as lemon verbena, mint, lemon thyme, lemon balm, hyssop, chamomile, citrus rind and ginger – alone and in combination. The one I make most is a combination of mint and lemon verbena. It is very beautiful made in a glass teapot so you can see the brilliant green leaves… I like to use small clear tea glasses, as they do in Morocco, so the lovely pale green colour is visible.’

Fresh from the garden: your choice of fresh herbs – English mint, spearmint, peppermint, lemon verbena, chamomile flowers, lemon thyme – orange, cumquat or lemon rind – ginger, cinnamon

Recipe source: adapted from a recipe by Alice Waters in The Art of Simple Food

Equipment:

  • Measuring jug
  • Saucepan with lid
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Ladle
  • Tea cups or glasses
Ingredients:

  • A large handful of herb stalks, leaves and/or flowers
  • A thumb-sized knob of ginger or a stick of two of cinnamon or cassia bark
  • 2 litres of water

What to do: 

  • Measure the water into the saucepan and heat on high to boil.
  • Wash the herbs in several changes of water and shake dry.
  • Rinse the ginger, if using, and chop into thin slices, skin on.
  • When the water in the saucepan is boiling, carefully drop in the herbs and pieces of ginger.
  • Turn the heat off and let the tisane steep for several minutes.
  • Ladle into cups or glasses to serve.

Notes: What is a tisane? What other herbal combinations can you think of?

Categories: Kitchen Garden, Recipe | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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