Posts Tagged With: Alice Waters

Broad bean puree

Alice says, ‘As the season progresses, the beans continue to mature, and they become larger and starchier. At this point they can be popped out of their pods, skinned and cooked into a luscious, bright green puree that I adore slathering on crisp croutons or serving alongside roasted meats.’

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: broad beans, garlic, rosemary
Recipe source: Alice Waters, The Art of Simple Food
Serves: 8 or 28 tastes

Equipment:

  • Medium heavy-bottomed saucepan
  • Colander
  • Scales
  • Bowls – 3 big, medium
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Measures – jug
  • Paper towel
  • Food mill
  • Spoon
  • Serving bowls
Ingredients:

  • 1.8kg broad beans in shell
  • 100ml olive oil
  • 4 garlic cloves
  • 1 branch rosemary
  • Flaked salt
  • 100ml water
  • 50ml extra-virgin olive oil

 What to do:

  • Bring a pot of water to the boil as you shell the broad beans.
  • Blanch quickly in the boiling water and then drain & cool in a bowl of cold water for a minute. Drain and pop the beans out of their skins. Wipe the saucepan clean.
  • Peel and slice the garlic cloves. Wash and wipe dry the rosemary.
  • Heat 100ml olive oil in the dry saucepan, then add the broad beans, garlic, the branch of rosemary, a pinch of salt and 100ml water, and cook until the beans are very tender, stirring occasionally, and adding more water if necessary.
  • The beans are done when they can be crushed easily with the back of a spoon, about 15 minutes. Mash with a spoon or pass them through a food mill.
  • Stir in the 50ml extra-virgin olive oil. Taste and season with salt as needed.
  • Serve right away or at room temperature.

Notes: What is another name for broad beans? What would be good to serve with the puree?

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Herbal tisane

ourkitchengarden.net

Alice says, ‘A tisane is a fresh tea, an infusion of fragrant herbs, or flowers or spices, in boiling water. It is a soothing a refreshing finish to a meal, is complementary to most desserts, and offers a mild alternative to coffee. Tisane can be made from such flavourings as lemon verbena, mint, lemon thyme, lemon balm, hyssop, chamomile, citrus rind and ginger – alone and in combination. The one I make most is a combination of mint and lemon verbena. It is very beautiful made in a glass teapot so you can see the brilliant green leaves… I like to use small clear tea glasses, as they do in Morocco, so the lovely pale green colour is visible.’

Fresh from the garden: your choice of fresh herbs – English mint, spearmint, peppermint, lemon verbena, chamomile flowers, lemon thyme – orange, cumquat or lemon rind – ginger, cinnamon

Recipe source: adapted from a recipe by Alice Waters in The Art of Simple Food

Equipment:

  • Measuring jug
  • Saucepan with lid
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Ladle
  • Tea cups or glasses
Ingredients:

  • A large handful of herb stalks, leaves and/or flowers
  • A thumb-sized knob of ginger or a stick of two of cinnamon or cassia bark
  • 2 litres of water

What to do: 

  • Measure the water into the saucepan and heat on high to boil.
  • Wash the herbs in several changes of water and shake dry.
  • Rinse the ginger, if using, and chop into thin slices, skin on.
  • When the water in the saucepan is boiling, carefully drop in the herbs and pieces of ginger.
  • Turn the heat off and let the tisane steep for several minutes.
  • Ladle into cups or glasses to serve.

Notes: What is a tisane? What other herbal combinations can you think of?

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Lemongrass tisane

Fresh from the garden: lemongrass

Recipe source: adapted from a recipe by Alice Waters in The Art of Simple Food ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Alice says, ‘A tisane is a fresh tea, an infusion of fragrant herbs, or flowers or spices, in boiling water. It is a soothing a refreshing finish to a meal, is complementary to most desserts, and offers a mild alternative to coffee. Tisane can be made from such flavourings as lemon verbena, mint, lemon thyme, lemon balm, hyssop, chamomile, citrus rind and ginger – alone and in combination. The one I make most is a combination of mint and lemon verbena. It is very beautiful made in a glass teapot so you can see the brilliant green leaves… I like to use small clear tea glasses, as they do in Morocco, so the lovely pale green colour is visible.’

Equipment:

  • Measuring jug
  • Saucepan with lid
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Ladle
  • Tea cups or glasses
Ingredients:

  • A lemongrass stalk with leaves
  • 2 litres of water

What to do:

  • Measure the water into the saucepan and heat on high to boil.
    • Holding the lemongrass carefully, rinse it and cut the stalk from the leaves.
    • Chop the stalk into 2cm lengths.
    • Fold the leaves into a small bunch, tying together to secure.
    • When the water in the saucepan is boiling, carefully drop in the bundle & the chopped stalk.
    • Turn the heat off and let the tisane steep for several minutes.
    • Ladle into cups or glasses to serve.

Notes: What is a tisane? Why do we have to be careful when handling lemongrass? What other combinations can you think of?

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