Posts Tagged With: garden

Zucchini, mint and feta salad with crunchy pangrattato

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If you have a spiraliser then this dish is easy and looks fantastic! If not, then julienne your zucchini by slicing or peeling them into as thin strips as possible.

Fresh from the garden: zucchini, mint, lemon, sage, mint
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 6 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

·     Food processor

·     Measures – cup, ½ cup, tablespoon, teaspoon

·     Microplane zester

·     Paper towel

·     Large frying pan

·     Spiraliser

·     Scissors

·     Citrus juicer

·     Serving bowls and smaller bowls for pangrattato

 

 

 

 

Ingredients:

For the pangrattato:

·     1/2 teaspoon fennel seeds

·     1/2 teaspoon chilli flakes

·     2 tablespoons olive oil

·     Half a small loaf of sourdough bread

·     1/2 cup pepitas (pumpkin seeds)

·     1 lemon

·     3 sage leaves

For the salad:

·     3 zucchini

·     A small branch of mint leaves

·     3 tablespoons olive oil

·     100g Danish feta

·     Flaked salt

What to do:

For pangrattato:

  1. Break or tear the sourdough into small chunks and then blend up in the food processor until they resemble breadcrumbs. You’ll need about a heaped cup.
  2. Wash and wipe the lemon dry, then zest the lemon, taking only the thin layer of skin off and leaving the white pith on. Wash the sage leaves and gently press dry with a piece of paper towel. With scissors, snip into thin strips.
  3. Heat the 2 tablespoons of olive oil in the frying pan. Add the rest of the pangrattato ingredients and toss until golden and crunchy (this takes about 5 minutes). Taste and add more seasoning if needed. Set aside to cool and crisp up.

For zucchini salad:

  1. Wash the zucchini and wipe dry, then spiralise or julienne them into thin strips. Wash the mint, press dry with a piece of paper towel and using the scissors, snip them into thin strips. You should have about 2 tablespoons worth.
  2. Cut the zested lemon in half and juice one half.

To finish:

  1. Place zucchini in a dish, top with mint leaves, oil and the lemon juice and season with a grind of pepper. Check the seasoning and add a sprinkle of salt if needed. Weigh the feta and crumble what you need into the zucchini. Toss to combine and divide out into your serving bowls.
  2. To serve, top salad with a little of the pangrattato and serve the rest in little bowls on the side for each person to help themselves to, just before eating.

Notes: What does a heaped cup mean? How does a spiraliser work? What is pangrattato?

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Kitchen News 14th February 2017

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This article originally appeared in the school newsletter on 16th February.

Week 4 already! The Chinese Banquet Menu has reared its Roostery head again in Kitchen, with Chicken, spinach and coriander pot-sticker dumplings with honey soy on the menu, the children diligently filling gow gee wrappers with the blended green mush, and sealing the dumplings up tightly… the Vegetable spring rolls have the students preparing all the veggies and then stir-frying with rice vermicelli noodles in a big wok, then rolling up in the pastry and sticking firm with waterdrops, and serving with their homemade sweet green chilli sauce. I learnt today that my recipe is incorrect in chopping up the noodles as the long ones are supposed to signify a long life, and by chopping them up we have been shortening everybody’s lifespan! Sorry about that everybody!

Another success is the Shanghai-style eggplant. I cannot tell you enough how amazingly delicious this dish is! If you have a steadfast eggplant-hater in your life (as I do, two of them) then I implore you to try the recipe at home – it’s available on Edmodo via the SAKGP Bondi group page (see code below to join if you haven’t already). It’s a winner, and renders the eggplant almost unrecognisable. It’s like vegetable chocolate! (ish).

Kylie Kwong’s Chilled cucumber salad is brilliant, especially on a hot day like these, and we have now introduced Special fried rice to the list, with long grain rice cooked the day before and wok-fried with beaten egg and spring onions. Delish!

And served with a really delicate and powder-pink Chinese cup of Jasmine tea. Yum cha indeed.

By the time you read this we should have our timetables sorted and our class reps elected. Please look out for your next Class News with details of Kitchen Garden lessons, and if you can spare the time, please come along and help as we really do need you! Parents from Kindergarten, Year 1 and Year 2 gratefully received too.

The SignUp link for all classes: http://signup.com/go/n5ciGB – please remember to bring your Working With Children signed form to show the office if you haven’t already!

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Roasted winter veggies with rosemary honey drizzle

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The colder weather brings us fennel, cauliflower and carrots and they’re delicious drizzled in buttery honeyed goodness!

Fresh from the garden: fennel, cauliflower, carrot, potato, rosemary
Recipe source: Melissa Moore
Serves: 6 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Large rimmed baking tray
  • Baking paper
  • Paper towel
  • Chopping boards and knives
  • Colander
  • Salad spinner
  • Mixing bowls
  • Spatula
  • Scales
  • Measures: ¼ cup, tablespoon, teaspoon
  • Small saucepan
  • Serving bowls
Ingredients:

  • 3 or 4 large carrots
  • Half a small cauliflower
  • A couple of fennel
  • 2 large potatoes
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1½ teaspoons coarse salt
  • 25g unsalted butter
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1 sprig fresh rosemary

 

What to do:

  1. Preheat oven to 220C. Line a large rimmed baking sheet with baking paper and set aside.
  2. Scrub the potatoes under running water and wipe dry. Without peeling, chop them into 2cm cubes by cutting into slices first, then rods, then cubes.
  3. Wash and shake dry the cauliflower and chop into small florets and cubes.
  4. Scrub the carrots and peel, then slice into small chunks.
  5. Wash the fennel, taking care to rinse out any hidden dirt. Chop into smallish pieces.
  6. In a large bowl, toss together all the veggies with the oil and salt until well combined. Place in an even layer on prepared baking sheet.
  7. Transfer to oven and roast, turning with a spatula once or twice during cooking, until browned and turnips are easily pierced with a paring knife, for about 25 minutes.
  8. Meanwhile, wash the rosemary sprig and wipe dry with paper towel. Strip the needles from the stalk and finely chop using a large knife. We will need about a tablespoon worth.
  9. Melt the butter in a small saucepan over medium heat. Add honey and rosemary, let simmer for a few seconds and remove from heat.
  10. Transfer veggies to serving bowls and drizzle with butter mixture. Toss to combine and serve.

Notes: What other winter veggies can you name? What does fennel smell like?

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Kitchen News 1st Dec 2015

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So we’ve just finished a Super-Spring menu of the last of the globe artichokes with lemon, garlic and herbs and a really fabulous bruschetta with zucchini, feta and basil (yes zucchini! The kids loved it!). We rolled out reams of bright purple pasta for beetroot ravioli with goats cheese and mint and also finely sliced onions and leaves for the chunky kale and borlotti bean soup – great for those 42 degree days – and chopped, blended and blended (and blended) all the fennel tops, onion, garlic, celery, parsley and sundried tomatoes for the recipe of Cornersmith’s bouillon that we water-bath and keep for stock for next year.

And then finishing the year in fine fettle, with a festive menu of carrot and potato latkes with apple sauce and a brightly coloured broad bean, parmesan and pea mash scooped up with wedges of garlicky flatbreads. We’re harvesting all that we can to finish off the garden year, so plating up End-of-Year salad bursting with tomatoes, cucumbers, crispy kale and sautéed tatsoi with bunches of herbs and a tangy dressing. And then to finish: a repeat of last year’s delicious rosemary shortbread. Hallelujah!

Thank you to all you intrepid and generous volunteers that have given your precious time to us this year. As you know, we couldn’t do it without you and YOU are the reason the Kitchen Garden Program at Bondi is such a success. Not only in guiding and encouraging our eager students, but also in supporting our roles and your continued words of wisdom and inspiration. We hope you have a wonderful holiday and get to spend it doing stuff you really love!

See you all next year,

Melissa

PS We really do need lots of help over the holidays with the chickens – when Vacation Care is closed and on the weekends – so if you’re staying in Bondi we’d appreciate your assistance!

To Volunteer for Classes or Chickens: click on VolunteerSpot at http://vols.pt/8qCfEY

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Kitchen News October 20th 2015

ourkitchengarden.net

Goodness, so much on! A ripper of a GPs Day with all Farmer Rob’s sausages gone, loads of tea towels* sold and most of the jars of pickles, jams and marmalade… Congratulations to all who bought the Honey Pickled Kohlrabi too – please let me know what you do with it and there will be a prize for the best answer! Thanks as always to the small army of wonderful ladies (and grandad Johnny) who gave their valuable time on a hot day to raise funds for the SAKGP, and especially Christina (Maia and Juno) who was with me ALL DAY helping Farmer Rob & Miss Toole, I mean Mrs Lawlor! Thank you!

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*Tea towels! If you have been out of the loop this week you may have missed out on the tea towel story… All our students by year – all the way through from K to 5/6 – have illustrated their face and are included on a beautiful and present-worthy tea towel (75% linen, 25% cotton!). They are $15 each and will be sold on Monday and Friday mornings from 8.45am before school. Look out for us around the office and form an orderly queue please!

ourkitchengarden.net                       ourkitchengarden.net

So last week we had some of the groups chopping, pickling, sterilising and canning beetroot and kohrabi and rhubarb and blood oranges to get jars shop-ready, so this week the pressure is off and it’s back to B.A.U… Spinach and ricotta calzone, Silverbeet soup with curry spices and coriander, Leafy poached egg salad with kale & herby mayo and even a new recipe with yet another way to spell tabouleh, tabboulleh etc: Green tabule salad for spring. So there you go!

ourkitchengarden.net

Term 4 is a busy time of year and historically volunteer numbers always drop off, even though we still really need you. A glance at VolunteerSpot and you will see – we had no parent helpers for one of our classes this week, only one for another and just two parents for another. We are set-up to run five groups for every class – with ingredients bought and vegetables harvested – but in most stages are only able to run as many groups as there are adults, for obvious safety reasons. It’s such a pity for the children to be prepped for a dish and then to realise they are not able to make it due to low adult attendance. Please, if you can come and help please do! There are not many lessons left til the end of the year so we’d love to see you if you can spare the time. Thanks

Love Mx

ourkitchengarden.net

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STOP PRESS! school holiday program changes…

ourkitchengarden.net

The broad beans are bursting!
The bees are buzzing!
The lemon blossom is blooming!
The strawberries are swelling!

This all means one thing: SPRING!!!

Here are the latest details on our Spring school holiday program:

I’ve got 4 spots available on Tuesday the 2nd October and one spot on Wednesday 3rd – so if you know any budding cook or gardener who’d like to join our merry band, let me know asap!
(The keen-bean morning session for little’uns on Friday is SOLD OUT!) xx

ourkitchengarden.net

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Salad of blood orange, beetroot, radish and goats’ cheese

We love the arrival of blood oranges to signify the end of winter & beginning of spring! This salad is a firm favourite of ours, with its contrasting flavours and textures, and beautiful deep colours.

Our Kitchen Garden

Serves: 6 or 24 tastes
Fresh from the garden: blood oranges, radishes, beetroot, beetroot leaves, lettuce leaves, marjoram

Equipment:

  • Chopping board & knife
  • Small saucepan & lid
  • Colander
  • Paper towel
  • Measuring: tablespoon, teaspoon
  • Bowls – large, small
  • Garlic press
  • Salad spinner
  • Fork
  • Plates to serve
Ingredients:

  • 3 or 4 baby beetroot
  • A small bunch of radishes
  • Small sprig of marjoram
  • A handful of lettuce leaves
  • 3 blood oranges
  • 1 garlic clove
  • 2 teaspoons aged balsamic vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • A small roll of goats’ cheese
  • Flaked salt and black pepper

What to do:

  • Cut the leaves from the beetroot, leaving about 2cms of stalk and reserving any small leaves. Gently scrub the beets to remove any dirt and place them in the saucepan with cold water to cover by about 5cm. Heat on high with lid on and boil for 20 minutes until soft when pierced.
  • Remove the stalks from the radishes & discard. Wash them well and then wipe dry with paper towel. Finely slice the radishes into thin discs and slide them into the big bowl.
  • Wash, dry and pick the marjoram leaves and reserve for the garnish.
  • Carefully wash and spin the lettuce and beetroot leaves dry. Break up into smaller pieces with your hands if needed, then roll up into a kitchen paper-lined tea towel & place in the fridge until needed.
  • Peel the oranges, removing any white pith and discarding it. Carefully cut the oranges into thin slices crossways and then place them into the big bowl. Scrape any juice into the bowl.
  • Squeeze the garlic through the garlic press into the small bowl.
  • Mix into the garlic the balsamic vinegar and olive oil, whisk with the fork and pour over the orange and radishes.
  • Season with salt and pepper and stir together gently. Leave to marinate for 10 minutes.
  • Meanwhile when the beetroot are soft, drain the saucepan and fill with cold water to cool the beets. When cool to handle, slide off the skins and root and thinly slice the beetroot. Add the slices to the radish and orange and combine in the dressing.
  • To finish, divide the salad leaves among your serving plates and scatter the beetroot mixture on top. Remove the wrapping from the goats’ cheese and dab chunks of cheese over each salad. Sprinkle with the marjoram and serve.

Notes: What other fruit and vegetable combinations can you think of for a salad? What other fruits can be dressed with balsamic vinegar? Why do we let the salad ‘rest’ for 10 minutes?

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October 2012 school holiday program

We have only two spaces left in the full-day sessions for kids aged 7 to 12!
One spot on Tuesday 2nd & one on Wednesday the 3rd October… the morning session for the little kids on Friday 5th October is FULL!

9.30am to 3pm @ $85 per child.

Give me a call on 0414 978 957 to book in for the Tuesday or Wednesday sessions and I’ll forward on the booking form – or you can download it here – or message me below to register for future programs.

Thanks! Melissa

Our Kitchen Garden

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Heirloom Tomatoes

Olly graced me with a second sleep today of two hours, which allowed me to dig the composted cow manure & lovely rich new soil into the cleared garden bed, and plant my new heirloom tomato seedlings. I’m so excited that I managed to achieve it as I usually would procrastinate & not get around to it, and leave the pots out until the little plants fried in the hot spring sun… When I worked at Sean’s Panaroma in the summer they used to make a very simple tomato salad, but the tomatoes were so delicious that you couldn’t believe the flavour in your mouth… I’m going to attempt to grow some of the same crazy ones I saw there: Black Russian, Green Zebra, Black Krim and Lemon Drop as well as Grosse Lisse and Principe Borghese. I hope to have some fabulous looking photos up here by Christmas!

It’s  a lovely feeling, to be making use of the vegetable beds, as I remember when we moved in almost two years ago and I felt such worry to be taking on another person’s established organic garden, with lots of vegetables I couldn’t identify. And I can fully understand how gardening is reccomended to people suffering from depression as it really does uplift the soul – especially when you see your seeds show their little green heads for the first time, and your seedlings flourish.

So, in anticipation  of a bumper crop of huge tomatoes in a few months’ time, here is my recipe for a wonderful and sneaky tomato/veggie sauce – perfect for pasta & rice, for kids big and small…

Sneaky Tomato Sauce
6-8 ripe tomatoes
a stick of celery
a carrot
a zucchini/some broccoli/whatever else!
half an onion
a clove of garlic
a few basil leaves
olive oil & salt
2 saucepans & a hand-held blender

Start by filling up one of the saucepans with water & setting over high heat to boil. In the meantime, chop up the onion and start to fry it off in the other saucepan with quite a good glug of the olive oil. After a minute or so add the chopped up carrot & celery and fry them off on high for a few minutes too. Then drop the heat to simmer, sprinkle a little salt over the top and sweat with the lid on while you do the next stage.

With the 1st pan of water boiling, drop the tomatoes in for 3 or 4 minutes. In the meantime chop up the zucchini or other veggies & add to the onion, carrot & celery. The tomatoes by this time should be ready to be pulled out to cool slightly – the skins now should be easy to peel off, if not put the tomatoes back in for another minute. Once all are peeled chop them up roughly and add to the veggies, with the crushed garlic & half a cup of water. Now bring up to the boil and then immediately turn down to simmer for at least 20 minutes, stirring every so often.

If I’m in the middle of a hundred things, I leave the pot with the lid on, to rest until I’ve got time to add the basil & whizz it all up to a smooth sauce, and then pour it all into containers to freeze or chill or eat.

Que aproveche!

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