Posts Tagged With: vegan

Lemon myrtle tea

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We make all sorts of herbal tea variations at Bondi, using aromatic lemongrass leaves, lemon balm, lemon verbena, mint, lemon thyme, chamomile, citrus rind and ginger… The tea is easy to make and lovely chilled from the fridge overnight too, once the tea has brewed just remove the leaves so that it doesn’t stew.

Foraged bush tucker: lemon myrtle leaves
Recipe source: Melissa Moore
Makes: 3 litres

Equipment:

  • Stockpot
  • Serving jugs

 

Ingredients:

  • A bunch of lemon myrtle leaves
  • 3 litres water

 

What to do:

  • Fill the stockpot with water and set it on high to boil with the lid on.
  • Rinse the bunch of leaves well in cold water and shake dry. Remove the leaves from the branch, discarding the branch.
  • Once the water is boiling, turn the pot off and carefully drop the herbs in.
  • Let the tea steep for several minutes and serve, ladling the tea carefully into jugs.

Notes: What else is herbal tea know as? What other herbs or spices could you use? What does aromatic mean?

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Kerry’s Tasty Daal

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This is easy to make and delicious! Add a few flakes of chilli if you like it spicy.

Fresh from the garden: onion, garlic, capsicum, ginger, tomato, coriander
Recipe source: Melissa’s friend Kerry
Serves: 4 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Kettle
  • Measures: jug, cup, tablespoon, teaspoon
  • Potato peeler
  • Chopping boards and knives
  • Food processor
  • Stockpot
  • Flat-edged wooden spoon
  • Serving bowls

 

 

 

Ingredients:

  • 500ml water and a tablespoon of bouillon (or 500ml veggie stock)
  • 1 small onion
  • 2 cloves of garlic
  • ½ red capsicum
  • 2cm knob of ginger
  • 1 large tomato
  • Rice Bran oil
  • 1 teaspoon mustard seeds
  • 1 cup red lentils
  • 1 teaspoon turmeric
  • 1 teaspoon cumin powder
  • 1 small can of coconut milk
  • Salt & pepper to taste
  • Small bunch of fresh coriander

What to do:

  1. Fill the kettle with half a litre of water and set it to boil. When boiled pour it into the measuring jug, add the tablespoon of bouillon and stir.
  2. Peel and finely chop the onion and garlic. Wash and finely chop the half capsicum. Peel the skin from the ginger and finely chop.
  3. Wash and finely chop the tomato. Wash the coriander and spin dry. Chop stems and leaves.
  4. Heat a couple of tablespoons of oil in the stockpot and add the mustard seeds. Once they start popping add the chopped onions and capsicum and fry for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the garlic and ginger, then fry for another minute.
  5. Add lentils and fry for 2 minutes, then add turmeric & cumin powder.
  6. Add a bit of the bouillon water and half the tin of coconut milk, then just keep adding little bits of each until all absorbed, stirring as you go.
  7. After 5 minutes add the chopped tomato and a sprinkle of salt and pepper.
  8. Once lentils are soft (usually 20 minutes or so) divide into serving bowls and garnish with the chopped coriander. 

Notes: What is turmeric? What family do lentils come from?

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Thai eggplant in coconut curry

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The flavours in this curry are so pure and fresh and clean… Just be sure to mash up the herb fibres so it’s not too hairy!

Fresh from the garden: eggplants, lemongrass, kaffir lime leaves, garlic, ginger, basil, spring onions
Recipe source: adapted from a recipe on herbivoracious.com
Serves: 4 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Chopping boards & knives
  • Measures: jug
  • Pastry brush
  • Oven tray
  • Rolling pin
  • Citrus juicer
  • Mini food processor
  • Frying pan
  • Serving bowls
Ingredients:

  • 4 large, long Japanese eggplants (more if smaller)
  • 100ml Rice Bran oil
  • Salt
  • 2 stalks lemongrass
  • 2 kaffir lime leaves
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 3cm piece ginger
  • A handful Thai basil
  • 1 lime
  • 1 can of coconut milk
  • 2 spring onions

What to do:

  1. Preheat the oven to 220C.
  1. Slice the eggplants lengthwise. Score them inside deeply on the diagonal into a diamond pattern, being careful not to cut all the way through. Brush with a little olive oil and season with salt. Roast in the oven on an oven tray until completely tender and browning, at least 20 minutes.
  2. To prepare the lemongrass: remove the outer layer of each stem and trim away the bottom 1/2cm and most of the top, leaving only about a 10cm piece that should be tender enough to sink a fingernail into. Now pound it with the rolling pin to release the flavours. Once you’ve given it a good thrashing, you can finely mince it.
  3. Wash the kaffir lime leaves and basil and finely slice.
  4. Peel the garlic and ginger and finely chop. Juice the lime.
  5. Meanwhile, in a mini food processor or a mortar and pestle, combine the chopped kaffir lime leaves, lemongrass, garlic, ginger and Thai basil and 1/2 teaspoon salt. Process or pound until you have a fairly fine paste. Mix in half of the lime juice.
  6. Trim the roots and top layer from the spring onions and wash them cold water, then finely slice into thin rings.
  7. Heat 2 tablespoons of oil in a frying pan. Fry the curry paste for 1 minute. Turn off the heat and mix in the coconut milk and half of the sliced spring onions. Let it rest a few minutes, then taste and add a little more salt and lime juice if needed.
  8. When the eggplant is done, pour a little of the sauce into your serving bowls. Divide the eggplant slices into the bowls and pour the rest of the sauce over the top. Garnish with the rest of the spring onions and serve. 

Notes: What is a kaffir lime leaf? Why do we need to take care when cutting the eggplants?

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Quinoa tabbouleh

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White quinoa is the most common variety, but red quinoa is also available and has a nuttier flavour. They can be used interchangeably. Quinoa is a fab alternative to grains and is gluten-free.

Fresh from the garden: basil, parsley, lemons, mint, cucumbers, tomatoes
Recipe source: adapted from a recipe by Martha Stewart on marthastewart.com
Serves: 6 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Stockpot with lid
  • Measures: cup, ½ cup, tablespoon, teaspoon, ¼ teaspoon
  • Wooden spoon, fork, teaspoon
  • Salad spinner
  • Mezzaluna
  • Microplane zester
  • Citrus juicer
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Peeler
  • Bowls – 1 large & 4 small
  • Measuring jug
  • Serving bowls
Ingredients:

Cook quinoa:

  • 1 cup quinoa
  • 1½ cups water
  • 1 teaspoon cooking salt

Make tabbouleh:

  • 4 large handfuls of parsley (about 2 cups when chopped)
  • 1 large handful mint leaves (about ½ cup when chopped)
  • 1 large handful basil leaves (about ½ cup when chopped)
  • 1 teaspoon flaked salt
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 lemons
  • 1 medium cucumber
  • 2 medium tomatoes
  • ½ cup extra-virgin olive oil

What to do:

  1. Toast quinoa in a stockpot over gentle heat, stirring frequently until fragrant for 6 to 8 minutes. Add the water and a teaspoon of cooking salt and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, cover, and simmer until grains are tender, about 15 minutes. Remove from heat and let stand, covered, for 10 minutes, then fluff with a fork and let cool to room temperature.
  2. Wash, spin dry and pick the leaves from the stems of the herbs. Coarsely chop using the mezzaluna.
  3. Zest one lemon to yield 1 teaspoon zest then cut both lemons and squeeze through the citrus juicer to yield 4 tablespoons juice.
  4. Peel the cucumber, cut in half lengthways and scrape out the seeds with the teaspoon. Cut the cucumber into small dice about ½cm square to yield about 1 cup.
  5. Cut the tomatoes into small dice about ½cm square to yield about 1 cup.
  6. Add all the ingredients to the large bowl, measure the olive oil and pour into the bowl, mixing thoroughly to combine.
  7. Divide amongst serving bowls and serve at room temperature.

Notes: What is quinoa? Why do we toast the quinoa first? What does cutting into ‘dice’ mean?

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Rosemary and tomato focaccia

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We love preparing dough, and this soft focaccia studded with tomatoes and rosemary is fantastic as part of an antipasto plate or with a hearty Italian-style soup. In class we use the previous class’s dough, and then make the new dough for the next class.

From the garden: tomatoes, rosemary
Recipe source: dough from a recipe by Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall
Serves: 4 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

·       Bowls – small, med, flat small

  • Measures – jug, teaspoon, tablespoon
  • Scales
  • Stand mixer & dough hook
  • Pastry brush
  • 20 x 30cm Swiss roll pan
  • Clean tea towel
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Serving plates
Ingredients:

For the topping:

·       Salt flakes

  • 1 large sprig of rosemary

·       A cup of cherry tomatoes

For the magic dough:

·       250g plain white flour

·       250g strong white flour

·       1½ level teaspoons fine sea salt

·       1 teaspoon instant dried yeast

·       1 tablespoon olive oil, plus a little extra for oiling

What to do:

  1. Preheat oven to 200°C.

For the focaccia:

  1. Brush the pan with 2 teaspoons of oil. Punch down the centre of the dough with your fist. Turn onto a lightly floured surface and knead for 2 minutes or until dough is elastic and has returned to its original size. Press into the prepared pan. Cover with the clean tea towel and set aside in a warm, draught-free place to prove for 20 minutes or until doubled in height.
  2. Meanwhile wash the rosemary & pat dry and pick the leaves from the stalks.
  3. Wash the tomatoes but leave any sepals on, and carefully dry on a piece of paper towel.
  4. Use your finger to press dimples into the dough. Brush with remaining oil and sprinkle over the rosemary and a sprinkle of salt. Gently press the tomatoes into the dough.
  5. Bake in oven for 25-30 minutes or until golden and the focaccia sounds hollow when tapped on base. Serve warm or at room temperature, carved into thin slices.
  6. While the focaccia is cooking you can make the dough for the next class before cleaning up!

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Now make the magic dough for the next class:

  1. Put the two flours into the bowl of the stand mixer with the salt and yeast. Mix well using the dough hook. Add the oil and 325ml warm water and mix to a rough dough. Knead for 5–10 minutes, until smooth. This is quite a loose and sticky dough, which is just as it should be – you get better-textured bread this way – so try not to add too much flour if you can help it, it will become less sticky as you knead.
  2. Trickle a little oil into a clean bowl, add the kneaded dough and turn it in the oil so that the bottom is covered with a light film. Cover with plastic wrap and leave in a warm place to rise until doubled in size – at least an hour, probably closer to two.

 Notes: What is process of doubling the dough in size called? What is a tomato sepal?

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Tom Yum paste

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This paste is commonly used for our Hot and Sour soup but you can also use it as a marinade for fish or chicken.

Fresh from the garden: lemongrass, garlic, ginger, chillies, coriander, spring onions, lime
Recipe source: adapted from a recipe by David Thompson
Makes: approx 100ml

Equipment:

·       Chopping boards and knives

·       Measures – tablespoon, teaspoon

·       Peeler

·       Salad spinner

·       Mixing bowls – 5 med & small

·       Citrus juicer

·       Stick blender and mini chopper with lid attachment

·       Mortar and pestle

·       Spatula

 

Ingredients:

·       1 lemongrass stalk

·       3 cloves garlic

·       1 small sized piece ginger or galangal

·       1 fresh red chilli, sliced or 1/2 teaspoon dried chilli

·       A small handful of coriander

·       2 spring onions

·       1 lime

·       1 tablespoon soy sauce or gluten free tamari

·       1 teaspoon palm sugar or brown sugar 

What to do:

  1. Cut or strip the leaves from the lemongrass stalk, taking care not to cut yourself on the leaves. Finely mince the lemongrass stalk (reserving the leaves to make tea) to yield 2 tablespoons.
  2. Peel and finely chop the 3 garlic cloves. Peel and finely chop the ginger.
  3. Slice the fresh chilli if using, discarding the stalk and seeds (unless you want it really hot!).
  4. Wash and spin the coriander dry and finely chop all the leaves and stems.
  5. Wash the spring onion, strip off the outer layer and trim off the roots. Finely slice.
  6. Cut the lime in half and squeeze out the juice.
  7. Place all ingredients in the mini food chopper and blitz to create the fragrant paste.
  8. You may need to grind the paste with the mortar and pestle and a sprinkle of flaked salt to make it really smooth.
  9. Scrape out the paste with the spatula & use!
  10. To store for later, spoon into a clean and dry jar, smooth down and add a thin layer of oil to cover, pop lid on and refrigerate.

Notes: What does fresh ginger smell like? What will you use the paste for?

 

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Garlicky rosemary flatbreads

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The dough needs to prove for at least an hour, so at Bondi, the previous class makes the dough for the current class, and the current class makes the dough for the next class. Simple!

Fresh from the garden: garlic, rosemary
Recipe source: adapted from a recipe by Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall in Veg Every Day
Serves: 8 or 28 tastes

Equipment:

  • Measures – jug,tablespoon, teaspoon, ½ teaspoon
  • Stand mixer
  • Scales
  • Bowls – large, medium
  • 2 non-stick frying pans
  • Rolling pins
  • Tongs & pastry brush
  • Plate & paper towel
  • Serving plates
Ingredients:

For the magic dough:

·       250g plain white flour
·       250g strong white flour
·       1½ level teaspoons fine sea salt
·       1 teaspoon instant dried yeast
·       1 tablespoon olive oil, plus a little extra for oiling

For the garlic oil:

  • About 120ml olive oil
  • 1 fat garlic clove
  • 1 long branch of rosemary 

What to do:

For the garlic oil:

  1. Wash the rosemary stalk, wipe dry with paper towel and strip the leaves from the stalk. Peel the garlic clove and very finely chop it. Combine the olive oil, rosemary and garlic in a frying pan and place over a medium heat. You’re not going to fry it, just warm it through to take the edge off the garlic. So as soon as you see the first signs of a sizzle, pour the oil and garlic out of the pan into a small bowl to infuse. Wipe the frying pan clean.

For the flatbreads:

  1. Knock back the risen dough, divide it int0 golf-ball sized balls and roll them into flat circles, as thin and round as you can.
  2. Meanwhile heat your non-stick frying pans over high heat until smoking hot.
  3. Carefully lay one flatbread in the pan and cook for about 2 minutes, until bubbly on top and patched with brown spots on the base. Flip over and cook for 1-2 minutes more. Remove immediately to a plate and paint with some of the garlicky rosemary oil. Scatter with a little flaked salt too. Repeat with all the dough. Cut the oiled flatbreads into wedges to serve.

Now make the magic dough for the next class:

  1. Put the two flours into the bowl of the stand mixer with the salt and yeast. Mix well using the dough hook. Add the oil and 325ml warm water and mix to a rough dough. Knead for 5–10 minutes, until smooth. This is quite a loose and sticky dough, which is just as it should be – you get better-textured bread this way – so try not to add too much flour if you can help it, it will become less sticky as you knead.
  2. Trickle a little oil into a clean bowl, add the kneaded dough and turn it in the oil so that the bottom is covered with a light film. Cover with plastic wrap and leave in a warm place to rise until doubled in size – at least an hour, probably closer to two.

Notes: What other recipes can we use the Magic Dough in? What is strong flour?

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Rocket soup with curry spices and coriander

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This soup is a great way to use up all the huge rocket leaves left over from the summer break that are too spicy to use in a salad.

Fresh from the garden: rocket, leek, potatoes, onion, garlic, coriander
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 6 or 24 tastes

 

Equipment:

  • Measures: tablespoons, teaspoons, ¼ teaspoon
  • Mortar and pestle
  • Peeler
  • Kettle
  • Mixing bowls: large, med, small
  • Chopping boards and knives
  • Large stockpot
  • Wooden spoon
  • Stick blender
  • Ladle
  • Paper towel
  • Scissors
  • Serving bowls

 

 

 

What to do:

Ingredients:

  • 1 onion
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 leek
  • 4 cloves of garlic
  • 3 potatoes
  • 1.5 litres boiling water
  • 2 tablespoons bouillon
  • A large handful rocket leaves
  • A small handful coriander

Curry paste:

  • A small knob of ginger
  • ½ teaspoon turmeric powder
  • A pinch of flaked salt
  • 2 teaspoons cumin seeds
  • 2 teaspoons coriander seeds
  • Pinch of cayenne pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon mustard seeds
  1. To make the curry paste: Peel the ginger and finely chop. Measure the rest of the spices into the bowl of the mortar, add the ginger & gently pound to a mash with the pestle.
  2. To make the soup: Fill the kettle to the 1.5 litre mark and set it to boil.
  3. Peel and finely chop the onions. Peel and finely chop the garlic cloves. Wash the leek under running water, peeling off the ugly layers, and checking underneath and trimming roots.
  4. Wash the rocket in several large bowls of cold water and shake dry over the sink. Finely chop the stalks and the leaves and reserve in a large bowl. Wash the potatoes but do not peel them and chop into 2cm dice.
  5. Heat the oil in the large stockpot over gentle heat. Add the curry blend and a grind of pepper and cook for 3 to 4 minutes. Add the onion and leek and cook until soft for about 5 minutes. Add in the chopped rocket, potatoes and garlic, stir in and then sweat for a few minutes with the lid on and the heat low.
  6. Carefully add the boiling water and the bouillon and bring to a boil. Reduce heat, cover and simmer for 10 minutes.
  7. Meanwhile wash the coriander and pat dry, then add into the soup just before blending.
  8. Puree the soup using the stick blender until super smooth and then check if you need to add any more salt. You probably will!
  9. Ladle into soup bowls and serve.
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Cornersmith’s bouillon

This recipe comes to us from the picklery Cornersmith in Marrickville. Bouillon is what we use instead of stock in all our soup and risotto recipes. The aim of the recipe is to use up excess vegetable parts – carrot tops, fennel tops, spinach stems, parsley stems etc.The recipe can be varied with the seasons by adding what you have on hand.

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: leeks, fennel, carrots, parsley, mint, coriander, onions
Recipe source: adapted from a recipe from the Cornersmith Café
Makes: 4 medium jars

Equipment:

  • Jars and lids
  • Large oven tray
  • Paper towel
  • Scales
  • Chopping boards & knives
  • Peelers
  • Large mixing bowls
  • Salad spinner, colander
  • Scissors
  • Wooden spoons
  • Food processor
  • Funnel, teaspoons
Ingredients:

  • 200g brown onions
  • 200g leeks
  • 200g fennel
  • 200g Dutch carrots
  • 200g celery
  • Carrot tops
  • 1 bunch parsley
  • 1 bunch mint
  • 1 bunch coriander
  • 40 sundried tomatoes
  • 1 head garlic
  • 200g fine cooking salt

What to do:

  1. Wash the jars and lids in hot soapy water, rinse well and drain upside down. Place all the jars onto an oven tray, right side up, and slide into the oven. Turn the oven on to 160C to sterilize for 15 minutes.
  2. Dry the lids with a clean piece of paper towel.
  3. Wash all the vegetables and scrub if needed. Trim any ugly bits and discard. Peel the onion & garlic, and carrots if needed.
  4. Wash the herbs, spin dry and finely snip, discarding any tough stalks.
  5. Using a large knife, chop all vegetables into small sized chunks. Snip the sun-dried tomatoes into thin slices using scissors.
  6. In batches if necessary, add the ingredients to the food processor.
  7. Process into a thick paste and then scrape out into a clean and dry large bowl. Mix the ingredients thoroughly with the salt so it is mixed in evenly. You can use your hands for this but beware of the onion fumes in your eyes!
  8. Put the funnel into the top of the sterilized jars.
  9. Fill the jars without touching any of the inside or rims, and seal tightly.
  10. You may want to ‘can’ the jars in a water-bath to preserve longer: Line a wide saucepan or stockpot with a rubber mat or tea towel, then place the full, sealed jars in so that none are touching the sides of the pot or each other. Fill with lukewarm water and then set to boil on high for between 10 and 20 minutes. Turn off then using tongs, carefully lift out the jars and leave to cool on a wooden board. Label when cool.

Notes: This is used as a replacement to stock: one tablespoon dissolved in 1 litre of boiling water. It can be added to stews and soups or any meals that need a boost of flavour.

Bouillon will last for a year unopened and stored in a cool dark place. Once opened, store it in the fridge and it should last you for at least 6 months.

ourkitchengarden.net

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Kale and borlotti bean soup

The kids at Bondi tend to favour smooth, blended soups but sometimes I like to shake things up a bit by getting them to prepare a super-hearty and super-chunky soup instead! This one amazingly always goes down well.

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Fresh from the garden: kale, onion, carrot, celery, garlic, thyme
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 6 at home or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Glass bowl
  • Measures: cup, tablespoon, teaspoon, ¼ teaspoon
  • Kettle
  • Chopping boards & knives
  • Large stockpot and lid
  • A selection of mixing bowls
  • Sieve
  • Bowls to serve
Ingredients:

  • 1 cup dried borlotti beans
  • 1 teaspoon bicarb soda
  • 1 large brown onion
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 2 carrots
  • 2 celery sticks
  • 1 bunch kale
  • Olive oil
  • 1 handful fresh thyme
  • 1/4 teaspoon dried chilli flakes
  • 1 tablespoon tomato paste
  • 400g tin diced tomatoes

What to do:

The night before:

  • Place beans in a non-reactive bowl and cover with lots of cold water and a teaspoon of bicarb. Soak for 8 hours or overnight.

In the lesson:

  1. Fill the kettle to the 1.5 mark and set it to boil.
  2. Peel and finely chop the onion and garlic cloves.
  3. Wash, peel and finely chop the carrots.
  4. Wash the celery and shake dry over the sink. Finely chop the stalks including the leaves.
  5. Wash the kale and shake dry over the sink. Slice off the stem, discarding into the compost and finely slice (shred) the kale leaves.
  6. Wash the thyme, spin it dry and strip off the leaves, discarding the stems into the compost.
  7. Pour olive oil into the stockpot just to cover the base and heat over medium heat. Add the onion, and cook until translucent for about 5 minutes stirring occasionally.
  8. Add in the carrot and celery and cook for another few minutes.
  9. Add the garlic, thyme and chilli flakes and then stir in the tomato paste.
  10. Drain the beans, rinse them and drain again. Add them and the tin of tomato, hot water and bouillon to the stockpot and bring to the boil. Reduce heat to low and simmer with the lid half on for 20 minutes or until the beans are tender, adding a little more water if the soup becomes too thick. Add the shredded kale and cook for 5 minutes.
  11. Taste to check for salt levels, then add more if needed and grind in some pepper, then serve. 

Notes: What is a non-reactive bowl? Why do we soak the beans?

ourkitchengarden.net

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