Posts Tagged With: beetroot

Beetroot pasta

This is the basic recipe for the pasta dough mixture as well as instructions on how to use a pasta machine.

ourkitchengarden.net

 Serves: 6 at home or 12 substantial tastes

Equipment:

  • Scales
  • Bowls
  • Pasta machines
  • Plastic wrap
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Pastry brush
  • Poles and somewhere to rest them
Ingredients:

  • 500g typo ‘00’ plain flour
  • 4 free-range eggs
  • 70g pureed beetroot

What to do:

To make the pasta:

  • Place the large bowl on the scales, reset to zero then measure the flour in to it. Add the beetroot.
  • Crack the eggs carefully into the small bowl, discarding any shell, then add them to the flour. Mix thoroughly with the wooden spoon, then tip the dough onto a clean, dry workbench.
  • Knead the dough for a few minutes, then wrap it in plastic film and let it rest for 1 hour at room temperature.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________

  • Fix the pasta machine to a suitable bench or table – if the surface is not thick enough you may need to place a thick book under the machine. Screw the clamp very tightly.
  • Clear a large space on the workbench alongside the pasta machine. All surfaces must be clean and dry. Press or roll the dough into a rectangle about 8 cm wide.
  • Set the rollers on the pasta machine to the widest setting and pass the dough through. The dough will probably look quite ragged at this stage. Fold it in 3, turn it 90 degrees and roll it through again. Go to the next-thickest setting and pass the dough through 3-4 times.
  • Continue in this manner (changing the settings and passing the dough through) until the dough has passed through the second thinnest setting. Don’t use the very thinnest setting, as the dough gets too fine and is hard to manage. If the dough gets too long to handle comfortably, cut it into 2-3 pieces using the large knife, and roll each piece separately.
  • Lay the pasta strips on a lightly floured surface & dust with a little more flour.
  • Attach the pasta cutter to the machine and pass through the largest rollers for linguine or the thinnest rollers for angelhair pasta, draping it in your hands to catch.
  • Carefully separate each strip and hang over a pole to dry.
  • Clean the pasta machine by brushing it with a dry, wide pastry brush & putting back in its box.

To cook the pasta:

  • When the stockpot has started a fast boil, gather your drying pasta on a large baking tray. Add a tablespoon of cooking salt and then the pasta to the pot, stir once and quickly put the lid back on.
  • As soon as the pot begins to boil again, take the lid off. The pasta should only take 1 or 2 minutes to cook from boiling. Taste to check – it’s important that the pasta remains al dente and is not overcooked!

Notes: Never wash the pasta machine – it will rust! Just brush down with a strong brush to remove the leftover dough.

ourkitchengarden.net

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Salad of roasted beets, broad beans and goats’ cheese

We love broad beans. We love beetroot. We love goats’ cheese. And we LOVE them together… What a perfect salad!

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: broad beans, beetroot & leaves, lettuces, marjoram, garlic
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 6 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Chopping board & knife
  • A saucepan with lid
  • Colander, scissors
  • Baking tray
  • Paper towel, baking paper, foil
  • Measuring: tablespoon, teaspoon
  • Bowls – large, small
  • Garlic press&salad spinner
  • Fork, skewer
  • Plates to serve
Ingredients:

  • 4 small beetroot
  • A large handful of broad beans
  • A handful of lettuce leaves
  • Small handful of marjoram sprigs
  • 4 garlic cloves
  • Aged balsamic vinegar
  • Flaked salt and black pepper
  • Extra-virgin olive oil
  • A small roll of goats’ cheese

What to do:

  • Preheat the oven to 200C.
  • Cut the leaves from the beetroot, leaving about 2cms of stalk. Reserve any small leaves. Gently scrub the beets under water to remove any dirt and dry thoroughly with paper towel. Wash and dry the marjoram sprigs and peel the garlic cloves.
  • Unroll a large section of foil and line with a slightly smaller piece of baking paper. Place the beets in the centre of the lined foil and throw in 3 cloves of garlic and half of the marjoram. Drizzle a tablespoon each of olive oil and balsamic vinegar over, sprinkle a pinch or two of flaked salt and pepper over and fold the foil package over to totally enclose.
  • Place the packet on the baking tray and slide into the oven for about an hour until beets are soft when pierced with a skewer. When done, carefully open the package and let the beets cool.
  • Fill the other saucepan with water and set on high to boil. Pod the broad beans, discarding the outer shell into the compost and add beans to the boiling water. Fill a large bowl with cold water and have ready.
  • Boil the broad beans for 3 minutes, drain and then immediately refresh in the bowl of cold water. Drain again and double-pod by slipping the outer shell off into the compost. Put the beans into a medium bowl.
  • Carefully separate then wash the lettuce and beetroot leaves and spin dry. Break or cut up into smaller pieces with your hands if needed.
  • Cut the last garlic clove in two and rub the cut side around the inside of a large bowl, then mix in 2 teaspoons of balsamic vinegar and 2 tablespoons olive oil, season with salt and pepper and stir together gently. Add the lettuce leaves and toss to coat.
  • When the beets are cool enough to handle, slide off the skins and roots, discarding into the chook bucket and thinly slice the beets. Add the slices to the dressing and toss to soak.
  • To finish, divide the salad leaves among your serving plates and scatter the beetroot slices on top. Scatter the broad beans over the top, then remove the wrapping from the goats’ cheese and dab chunks of cheese over each salad. Drizzle over the remaining dressing, sprinkle with the reserved marjoram and serve.
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Beetroot soup with creme fraiche and chives

This recipe is our version of Borscht – it’s a favourite with the children as it’s so beautifully vibrant in colour and sweet as well as earthy – and one also might be seeing its effects for a good while afterwards…!

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: beetroot, onion, garlic, thyme, chives
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 4 at home or 20 tastes

Equipment:

  • Chopping board and knife
  • Garlic press
  • Kitchen paper
  • Graters
  • Measures – jug, tablespoon
  • Stockpot
  • Wooden spoon
  • Stick blender
  • Teaspoons
  • Serving bowls
Ingredients:

  • 1 medium onion
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 4 sprigs thyme
  • Small bunch chives
  • 3 large beetroot
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 litre boiling water with 1 tablespoon bouillon (or 1 litre stock)
  • 1 tin chopped tomatoes
  • Flaked salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 small tub crème fraiche or sour cream

What to do:

  • Fill the kettle and set it to boil, then measure a litre of boiling water into the jug and stir in a tablespoon of bouillon. Reserve.
  • Peel and chop the onion. Peel and squeeze the garlic through the press.
  • Wash and peel the beetroot and carefully grate.
  • Warm olive oil in the stockpot over medium heat. Stir in the onions and garlic and cook until soft but not browned, about 5 minutes. Stir in the grated beetroot and the thyme and cook for 1 minute.
  • Stir in the tomatoes and the stock and season with salt and pepper. Bring to the boil and then cover and simmer until the beetroot is tender, about 20 minutes. Remove from heat and allow to cool slightly.
  • Meanwhile wash the chives and lay out on a piece of kitchen paper to dry, then snip or chop finely. Wash and dry the thyme and pick the leaves, then chop finely.
  • Whizz the soup with the stick blender, stirring to get all the solids mixed in.
  • Check the seasoning, then ladle into bowls and garnish with a little dab of the crème fraiche or sour cream and sprinkle of chives.

Notes: What other dishes have their original names in a different language?

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Kitchen News – 24th October 2013

ourkitchengarden.net

Week 3 already and it’s hot, humid and very smoky… scary to think what the rest of these warm seasons’ weather holds in store? While the mountains burn, the garden here bursts with produce… For a while there I thought that this term would be quieter than the last’s multitude of activities and extravaganzas but I’ve been deluding myself!

We have been welcoming the Year 2 students into the Kitchen Garden program these last weeks, so they’ve been boning up on all the safety issues related to working in a busy kitchen, and also demonstrating knife skills (and Bear Paw: RAAAARRRR!) with flair and precision. Next lesson will include the formal ceremony of Presentation of the Knife Licences…! The children also got a taste of kitchen lessons to come and managed to whip up some snacky antipasto snacks too while they were at it, (clever little cooks that they are already!) so we feasted on Bruschetta with smashed broad beans and garlic; Danish feta with lemon and thyme; Roasted capsicum and garlic cloves with herbs; A simple salad with edible flowers; and rolled out some crispy Rosemary and thyme grissini. Tutto bene!

The biggest news is that we have a new Garden Specialist! Allison has jumped into the role with gusto, and has already started lessons with the children. (Thanks to Emma for all your support this week!) Please drop in to the garden and say hi if you have a moment – and PLEASE consider volunteering for one of our 10 weekly lessons if you have an hour or so to spare! Or even put your hand up for a bit of Stink Bug extermination?!

On the menu this week: the gorgeous-hued Beetroot linguine with landcress, lemon and aromatic herbs; a super-delicious Green lentil and spinach soup; the most fabulous crunchy and spicy Eurasian slaw; and also hand-rolled out some Rosemary and thyme grissini to dip into Yotam’s hummus. Veg-heavy and wonderful – and very little scraps left for the chooks!

For loads of great photos from the week and recipes updated fortnightly, check back here!

Cheers all x

ourkitchengarden.net

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Beetroot linguine with land cress, lemon and garden herbs

Our Kitchen Garden students love making pasta – and this recipe sings of spring! It includes the dough mixture as well as instructions on how to use a pasta machine.

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: eggs, beetroot, land cress, lemon, marjoram, parsley, coriander
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 8 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Salad spinner
  • Pasta machine
  • Scales, garlic press
  • Scissors
  • Plastic wrap
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Pastry brush, grater
  • Large stock pot
  • Tongs, large & small bowls
  • Serving bowls
Ingredients:

  • 500g typo ‘00’ plain flour
  • 4 free-range eggs
  • 70g pureed beetroot
  • A large handful of land cress (or watercress)
  • A handful of freshly picked herbs
  • 1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • A lemon
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • Flaked salt & black pepper
  • 30g parmesan

What to do:

To make the pasta:

  • Place the large bowl on the scales, reset to zero then measure the flour in to it. Add the beetroot.
  • Crack the eggs carefully into the small bowl, discarding any shell, then add them to the flour. Mix thoroughly with the wooden spoon, then tip the dough onto a clean, dry workbench.
  • Knead the dough for a few minutes, then wrap it in plastic film and let it rest for 1 hour at room temperature.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________

  • Fill the large stockpot and the saucepan with water and set to boil on high with the lids on.
  • Fix the pasta machine to a suitable bench or table – if the surface is not thick enough you may need to place a thick book under the machine. Screw the clamp very tightly.
  • Clear a large space on the workbench alongside the pasta machine. All surfaces must be clean and dry. Press or roll the dough into a rectangle about 8 cm wide.
  • Set the rollers on the pasta machine to the widest setting and pass the dough through. The dough will probably look quite ragged at this stage. Fold it in 3, turn it 90 degrees and roll it through again. Go to the next-thickest setting and pass the dough through 3-4 times.
  • Continue in this manner (changing the settings and passing the dough through) until the dough has passed through the second thinnest setting. Don’t use the very thinnest setting, as the dough gets too fine and is hard to manage. If the dough gets too long to handle comfortably, cut it into 2-3 pieces using the large knife, and roll each piece separately.
  • Lay the pasta strips on a lightly floured surface & dust with a little more flour. Attach the pasta cutter to the machine and pass through the largest rollers, draping it in your hands to catch.
  • Carefully separate each strip and hang over a pole to dry.
  • Clean the pasta machine by brushing it with a dry, wide pastry brush& putting back in its box.  

To finish the dish:

  • Check that the stockpot has been filled with water and is set on high to boil.
  • Wash the land cress in several changes of water and spin dry. Using the scissors, snip the leaves into thin strips and reserve in a big bowl.
  • Wash and dry the lemon and zest it. Cut the lemon in half and squeeze its juice into the big bowl too.
  • Peel the garlic cloves and squeeze them through the garlic press into the bowl too.
  • Wash and spin dry the herbs and strip their leaves, then add them into the rocket bowl.
  • Measure 1/3 cup of olive oil into the bowl and sprinkle on a few pinches of flaked salt and toss to incorporate.
  • Measure the parmesan and grate what you need and keep separate.
  • When the stockpot has started a fast boil, gather your drying pasta on a large baking tray. Add a tablespoon of cooking salt and then the pasta to the pot, stir once and quickly put the lid back on.
  • As soon as the pot begins to boil again, take the lid off. The pasta should only take 1 or 2 minutes to cook from boiling. Taste to check – it’s important that the pasta remains al dente and is not overcooked!
  • Using tongs, carefully pull the pasta (and some of its cooking liquid) out and into the big lemony bowl, sprinkle the parmesan on and toss thoroughly to incorporate.
  • Divide into serving bowls, sprinkle the remaining parmesan on and eat immediately!

Notes: Never wash the pasta machine – it will rust! Just brush down with a strong brush to remove the leftover dough.

ourkitchengarden.net

Categories: Kitchen Garden, Recipe | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Salad of baby beets, broad beans and goats cheese

We love the arrival of broad beans to signify the warm weather! This salad is a firm favourite of ours, with its contrasting flavours and textures.

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: broad beans, beetroot, beetroot leaves, lettuce leaves, marjoram, garlic
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 6 at home or 24 tastes 

Equipment:

  • Chopping board & knife
  • 2 x saucepans with lids
  • Colander, scissors
  • Paper towel
  • Measuring: tablespoon, teaspoon
  • Bowls – large, small
  • Garlic press
  • Salad spinner
  • Fork, skewer
  • Plates to serve
Ingredients:

  • 4 baby beetroot
  • A large handful of broad beans
  • A handful of lettuce leaves
  • Small sprig of marjoram
  • 1 garlic clove
  • 2 teaspoons aged balsamic
  • Flaked salt and black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • A small roll of goats’ cheese

ourkitchengarden.net

What to do:

  • Cut the leaves from the beetroot, leaving about 2cms of stalk. Reserve any small leaves.
  • Gently scrub the beets under water to remove any dirt and place them in the saucepan with cold water to cover by about 5cm. Heat on high with lid on and boil for 20 minutes until soft when pierced with a skewer.
  • Fill the other saucepan with water and set on high to boil.
  • Pod the broad beans, discarding the outer shell into the compost and add beans to the boiling water. Fill a large bowl with cold water and have ready.
  • Boil the broad beans for 3 minutes, drain and then immediately refresh in the bowl of cold water. Drain again and double-pod by slipping the outer shell off into the compost. Put the beans into a medium bowl.
  • Carefully separate out, then wash the lettuce and beetroot leaves and spin dry. Break up into smaller pieces with your hands if needed, then roll up into a kitchen paper-lined tea towel & place in the fridge until needed.
  • Wash, dry and pick the marjoram leaves and reserve for the garnish.
  • Squeeze the garlic through the garlic press into a large bowl, then mix in the balsamic vinegar and olive oil, season with salt and pepper and stir together gently.
  • Meanwhile when the beetroot are soft, drain the saucepan and fill with cold water to cool the beets. When cool to handle, slide off the skins and root and thinly slice the beetroot. Add the slices to the dressing and toss to soak.
  • To finish, divide the salad leaves among your serving plates and scatter the beetroot slices on top. Scatter the broad beans over the top, then remove the wrapping from the goats’ cheese and dab chunks of cheese over each salad. Drizzle over the remaining dressing, sprinkle with the marjoram and serve.

ourkitchengarden.net

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BASC Vacation Care Program K-1 Tuesday 1st October

So the little ones worked at the low tables and each of the four groups rolled out linguine, podded broad beans, squeezed lemon juice, prepared herbs and grated parmesan – and then made the pasta for the next class, before clearing and setting the tables and the eating it all up! Deelicious! They also shared a little simple salad too: a perfect holiday lunch!

Beetroot linguine with broad beans, lemon and garden herbs

Our Kitchen Garden students love making pasta – and this recipe sings of spring! It includes the dough mixture as well as instructions on how to use a pasta machine.

oourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: eggs, beetroot, lemon, marjoram, parsley, thyme
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 4 at home or 12 tastes

Equipment:

  • Salad spinner
  • Pasta machine
  • Scales, garlic press
  • Measures – teaspoon
  • Food processor
  • Plastic wrap
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Pastry brush, grater
  • Large stock pot & saucepan
  • Tongs, large & small bowls
  • Serving bowls
Ingredients:

  • 250g typo ‘00’ flour
  • 2 free-range eggs
  • 50g pureed beetroot (see below)
  • A handful of broad beans
  • A handful of freshly picked herbs
  • Extra-virgin olive oil
  • Half a lemon
  • A garlic clove
  • Flaked salt & black pepper
  • 20g parmesan

What to do:

To make the beetroot puree:

  • Scrub a large beetroot under running water, then pop in a saucepan, fill with cold water and then heat to boil for about an hour.
  • Insert a skewer to check if the beet is cooked and soft, then drain, rinse under cold water, and then when cool to handle, slip off the skin with your fingers.
  • Place cooked beetroot in the food processor and blitz until blended to a puree consistency. Freeze the remaining beetroot puree.

To make the pasta:

  • Place the large bowl on the scales, reset to zero then measure the flour in to it. Add the beetroot.
  • Crack the eggs carefully into the small bowl, discarding any shell, then add them to the flour. Mix thoroughly with the wooden spoon, then tip the dough onto a clean, dry workbench.
  • Knead the dough for a few minutes, then wrap it in plastic film and let it rest for 1 hour at room temperature.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________

  • Fill the large stockpot and the saucepan with water and set to boil on high with the lids on.
  • Fix the pasta machine to a suitable bench or table – if the surface is not thick enough you may need to place a thick book under the machine. Screw the clamp very tightly.
  • Clear a large space on the workbench alongside the pasta machine. All surfaces must be clean and dry. Press or roll the dough into a rectangle about 8 cm wide.
  • Set the rollers on the pasta machine to the widest setting and pass the dough through. The dough will probably look quite ragged at this stage. Fold it in 3, turn it 90 degrees and roll it through again. Go to the next-thickest setting and pass the dough through 3-4 times.
  • Continue in this manner (changing the settings and passing the dough through) until the dough has passed through the second thinnest setting. Don’t use the very thinnest setting, as the dough gets too fine and is hard to manage. If the dough gets too long to handle comfortably, cut it into 2-3 pieces using the large knife, and roll each piece separately.
  • Lay the pasta strips on a lightly floured surface & dust with a little more flour. Attach the pasta cutter to the machine and pass through the largest rollers, draping it in your hands to catch.
  • Carefully separate each strip and hang over a pole to dry.
  • Clean the pasta machine by brushing it with a dry, wide pastry brush & putting back in its box.

ourkitchengarden.net

To finish the dish:

  • Check that the stockpot & saucepan have been filled with water and are set on high to boil.
  • Pod the broad beans, discarding the outer shell into the compost and add beans to the boiling water. Fill a large bowl with cold water and have ready.
  • Boil the broad beans for 3 minutes, drain and then immediately refresh in the bowl of cold water. Drain again and double-pod by slipping the outer shell off into the compost. Put the beans into the big bowl.
  • Wash and dry the lemon and zest it. Cut the lemon in half and squeeze its juice into the big bowl too.
  • Peel the garlic clove and squeeze it through the garlic press into the bowl too.
  • Wash and spin dry the herbs and strip their leaves, chopping with the mezzaluna, then add them into the garlicky broad bean bowl.
  • Measure 2 tablespoons of olive oil into the bowl and sprinkle on a few pinches of flaked salt and toss to incorporate.
  • Measure the parmesan and grate what you need.
  • When the stockpot has started a fast boil, carefully gather your drying pasta on a large baking tray. Add a tablespoon of cooking salt and then the pasta to the pot, stir once and quickly put the lid back on.
  • As soon as the pot begins to boil again, take the lid off. The pasta should only take 1 or 2 minutes to cook from boiling. Taste to check – it’s important that the pasta remains al dente and is not overcooked!
  • Using tongs, carefully pull the pasta (and some of its cooking liquid) out and into the big lemony bowl, sprinkle half the parmesan on and toss thoroughly to incorporate.
  • Divide into serving bowls, sprinkle the remaining parmesan on and eat immediately!

Notes: Never wash the pasta machine – it will rust! Just brush down with a strong brush to remove the leftover dough.

ourkitchengarden.net

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Cornersmith’s pickled beetroot

We pickled our own beetroot last week for the HalloweenFete… As long as your jars & lids are scrupulously clean and sterilised, the beautiful jars should last for ages! Not that our fete jars did however…

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: beetroot
Recipe source: Alex and Jamie at Cornersmith Café, Marrickville

Equipment:

  • Chopping boards and knives
  • Potato peelers
  • Food processor with vegetable blade attachment
  • Paper towel
  • Oven mitts
  • Large saucepan & wide pan
  • Tongs
  • Scales
  • Wooden spoon
  • Measures – cup, 1/4 cup, tablespoon
  • Glass jug for pouring
  • Jars and lids
  • Labels
Ingredients:

  • 3kg+ medium size beetroot
  • 1 litre white wine vinegar
  • 1 litre water
  • 1¾ cups raw sugar
  • ¼ cup salt
  • 2 tablespoons peppercorns
  • 2 tablespoons dried dill

 What to do:

  • Preheat the oven to 140C.
  • Wash the beets.  Trim off the leaves for another use.  Weigh the beetroot – you’ll need about 3kg. Peel the beets and add peels to compost.
  • Very thinly slice the beets using the blade attachment on the food processor.  (You could also use a large knife or a mandolin.)
  • Wash the jars and lids in hot soapy water, rinse well and drain upside down.
  • Place all the jars onto an oven tray, right side up, and slide into the oven to sterilize for 15 mins.
  • Dry lids with a clean piece of paper towel.
  • In a saucepan put vinegar, salt, water, sugar, peppercorns and dill. Gently heat until sugar is dissolved and then slowly bring to the boil.
  • Slide the tray of jars out of the oven and then carefully using tongs& an oven mitt, pack the sliced beets in.
  • Ladle the hot syrup into a glass jug and then pour over to cover beetroots. Leave a 5mm space at the top.
  • Seal immediately and leave to cool. Label when cool.
  • Leave to mature for at least a week.  The jars should be kept in a cool, dark place and will last at least 6 months if not a year!
  • Refrigerate after opening and eat within a month.

Notes:What other vegetables could we pickle? What other preserves could we make? Why do we sterilize the jars?

ourkitchengarden.net

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Our spring salad with strawberries and flowers

This is a lovely salad to pair with heavily flavoured dishes and is fun to prepare – try not to gobble all the strawberries first!

ourkitchengarden.net
Fresh from the garden: Beetroot, lettuces, rocket, strawberries, edible flowers, lemon, parsley, marjoram, thyme, coriander, oregano
Recipe source: Melissa

Equipment:

  • Medium saucepan
  • Bowls – 2 large
  • 2 salad spinners
  • Tea towel
  • Kitchen paper
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Mortar & pestle
  • Measure – 1/3 cup
  • Citrus juicer
  • Mezzaluna, teaspoon
  • Serving bowls, little tongs
Ingredients:

  • A bunch of baby beetroot
  • A large handful salad leaves
  • A few garnishing flowers
  • A handful of strawberries

Herby vinaigrette dressing

  • 1 small garlic clove
  • Flaked salt & black pepper
  • 1 lemon
  • 1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • A small handful mixed herbs:
    parsley, marjoram, thyme, coriander, oregano, chives

What to do:

  • Chop off the beetroot leaves, keeping any small leaves. Scrub the beets and place them whole into the medium saucepan and fill with cold water. Set to boil for about 20 minutes.
  • Fill up the 2 big bowls with cold water & wash the salad leaves, gently dunking them a handful at a time into the water, then pulling out to see if any dirt is left behind. Repeat in fresh water until no dirt remains. Spin the leaves dry and then wipe the bowls dry.
  • Wash the flowers separately and drain on a piece of paper towel. Keep the flowers reserved, picking off the petals to use.
  • Wash and spin dry the herbs, and pick off the leaves. Wash and hull the strawberries and slice.
  • Lay out the tea towel and line it with kitchen paper. Spread the salad leaves over the paper and roll the whole lot up like a log. Keep the rolled parcel of leaves in the fridge until needed.
  • When the beetroot are tender, drain them and place under running cold water until cool. Slip the skins off with your fingers and slice up.

To make the dressing:

  • Peel the garlic clove and put it in the mortar with a large pinch of salt. Pound to a paste.
  • Juice the lemon and add the juice to the mortar (without the pips) then stir the lot with the teaspoon and scrape it into a large bowl.
  • Stir in the olive oil and grind a little pepper, then whisk the dressing lightly. Add the herbs, chopping any large leaves in the mezzaluna if needed. Add to the dressing in the large bowl.

To assemble:

  • Unwrap the parcel of salad leaves & tip them into the bowl with the flower petals, herbs, strawberries, beetroot and the dressing. Gently turn the leaves in the dressing using your hands or tongs.
  • Transfer the salad to the serving bowls and serve immediately with little tongs.
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Fritatte of beetroot leaf, sweet potato and feta

Gordon’s original recipe calls for spinach but I think this is a great way to use up our many beetroot leaves. He also suggests cooking in one big pan over heat and then finishing under the grill, where we pour ours into muffin pans to oven-bake… We also add some of our lovely herbs for an aromatic twist.

ourklitchengarden.net

From the garden: sweet potato, beetroot leaves, eggs, marjoram, parsley
Recipe source: adapted from a recipe by Gordon Ramsay

Equipment:

  • Pastry brush, potato peelers
  • Scales
  • Chopping board & knives
  • Paper towel
  • Measuring tablespoon
  • Large frying pan
  • Wooden spoon
  • Large bowl
  • Tongs, whisk
  • Cupcake tins: 2×12-hole large or 2×24-hole mini
  • Serving plates
Ingredients:

  • 1 large sweet potato (about 500g)
  • Large handful of beetroot leaves
  • Small handful marjoram and parsley
  • 4 tablespoons olive oil plus extra
  • Flaked salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 200g feta cheese
  • 20g parmesan
  • 12 large eggs

What to do:

  • Preheat the oven to 180C. Brush a little olive oil into each cupcake hole.
  • Peel the sweet potato, and then chop flesh evenly into 1cm cubes.
  • Wash the beetroot leaves in several changes of water and shake dry. Chop the stalks and leaves into 1cm strips, to yield about 150g cut strips.
  • Wash the herbs and pat dry with paper towel. Strip the leaves from the stalks & chop finely.
  • Heat the frying pan with the oil and toss in the sweet potato. Season well with salt and pepper. Cook, turning occasionally, for about 4 minutes over medium heat until the cubes are just tender and lightly golden at the sides.
  • Meanwhile, cut the feta into small cubes and grate the parmesan.
  • Stir the beetroot leaves into the sweet potato and cook for about 3 minutes until wilted.
  • Then add the cubed feta and gently stir to mix in.
  • In the large bowl, lightly beat the eggs with the herbs, parmesan, a pinch of salt and a grind of pepper.
  • Divide the sweet potato mixture evenly into the cupcake holes, spoon the egg mixture over and bake in 180C oven: about 15 minutes for the mini frittate and 20 minutes for the large.

Notes: Why is the name of this recipe frittate, ending in e? What other vegetables could you use in the recipe? Which animals’ milk can make feta?

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