Posts Tagged With: Flour

Beetroot pasta

This is the basic recipe for the pasta dough mixture as well as instructions on how to use a pasta machine.

ourkitchengarden.net

 Serves: 6 at home or 12 substantial tastes

Equipment:

  • Scales
  • Bowls
  • Pasta machines
  • Plastic wrap
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Pastry brush
  • Poles and somewhere to rest them
Ingredients:

  • 500g typo ‘00’ plain flour
  • 4 free-range eggs
  • 70g pureed beetroot

What to do:

To make the pasta:

  • Place the large bowl on the scales, reset to zero then measure the flour in to it. Add the beetroot.
  • Crack the eggs carefully into the small bowl, discarding any shell, then add them to the flour. Mix thoroughly with the wooden spoon, then tip the dough onto a clean, dry workbench.
  • Knead the dough for a few minutes, then wrap it in plastic film and let it rest for 1 hour at room temperature.

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  • Fix the pasta machine to a suitable bench or table – if the surface is not thick enough you may need to place a thick book under the machine. Screw the clamp very tightly.
  • Clear a large space on the workbench alongside the pasta machine. All surfaces must be clean and dry. Press or roll the dough into a rectangle about 8 cm wide.
  • Set the rollers on the pasta machine to the widest setting and pass the dough through. The dough will probably look quite ragged at this stage. Fold it in 3, turn it 90 degrees and roll it through again. Go to the next-thickest setting and pass the dough through 3-4 times.
  • Continue in this manner (changing the settings and passing the dough through) until the dough has passed through the second thinnest setting. Don’t use the very thinnest setting, as the dough gets too fine and is hard to manage. If the dough gets too long to handle comfortably, cut it into 2-3 pieces using the large knife, and roll each piece separately.
  • Lay the pasta strips on a lightly floured surface & dust with a little more flour.
  • Attach the pasta cutter to the machine and pass through the largest rollers for linguine or the thinnest rollers for angelhair pasta, draping it in your hands to catch.
  • Carefully separate each strip and hang over a pole to dry.
  • Clean the pasta machine by brushing it with a dry, wide pastry brush & putting back in its box.

To cook the pasta:

  • When the stockpot has started a fast boil, gather your drying pasta on a large baking tray. Add a tablespoon of cooking salt and then the pasta to the pot, stir once and quickly put the lid back on.
  • As soon as the pot begins to boil again, take the lid off. The pasta should only take 1 or 2 minutes to cook from boiling. Taste to check – it’s important that the pasta remains al dente and is not overcooked!

Notes: Never wash the pasta machine – it will rust! Just brush down with a strong brush to remove the leftover dough.

ourkitchengarden.net

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Categories: Kitchen Garden, Recipe | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Hugh’s Magic Dough (for 1 pizza)

The Year 1 kids came to visit and made the pizza dough for the next group, while using the dough that the class before made…

ourkitchengarden.net

Squishing and squashing the dough

Recipe source: Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, Veg Every Day
Makes: 1 large pizza

Equipment:

  • Scales
  • Bowls – large, medium
  • Wooden spoon
  • Measures – tablespoon, teaspoon, ½ teaspoon
  • Cling film
Ingredients:

  • 125g plain white flour plus extra to flour
  • 125g strong white flour
  • 1 level teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon instant dried yeast
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil, plus a little extra for oiling
  • 160ml warm water

What to do:

  • Weigh the two flours into a big bowl and then add the salt and yeast. Mix well using the wooden spoon.
  • Measure out the warm water and then add the water and the oil to the flours and mix to a rough dough. Knead for a few minutes and then turn out onto a lightly floured table and knead again for about 10 minutes, until smooth. This is quite a loose and sticky dough, which is just as it should be – you get better-textured bread this way – so try not to add too much flour if you can help it, it will become less sticky as you knead.
  • Trickle a little oil into a medium bowl, add the kneaded dough and turn it in the oil so it is covered with a light film. Cover the bowl with cling film and leave in a warm place to rise until doubled in size – at least an hour, probably closer to two – or if using the next day, wrap bowl in cling film and put straight into the fridge to prove slowly.
  • When the dough is well risen and puffy, tip it out and ‘knock it back’ by poking it with your outstretched fingers until it collapses to its former size. It’s now ready to be shaped to your will.

Notes: Why do we leave the dough to rise? What is this process called? What does to knock it back mean? What will you make with your dough?

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Sunday: cooking with four-year-old Ava

A cup of Earl Grey and an Anzac biscuit, perfect

It’s a beautiful sunny day out there but there’s a frrrrreezing cold wind… Steve has sneaked away for forty winks and Olly has finally gone down too. Ava not so! She’s bouncing off the walls after allowing me to while away some time on the laptop. Now she wants action! How to amuse her quietly and let the others have their siestas? Let’s bake biscuits!

Ava rolls Anzac biscuits

Whilst it’s not Anzac Day here (not even close – 25th April?) I never need an excuse to make Anzac biscuits. And un-Australian as it may be – apologies to those purists out there – we add some orange zest. Because we’ve some fantastic oranges in the fruit bowl and we feel like it.

Ava is funny, she keeps bending down to hide her head under the table: she’s sneaking bits of raw oat & flour mixture and doesn’t want me to see… I tell her that the more she leaves now, the more biscuits we get to eat later but I think she likes the game of subterfuge… She loves rolling the little spheres of goo in her hands and asks me every time if the ball’s the right size. She lines them up neatly to one side of the baking tray, all rubbing together, and doesn’t really understand that they’ll all spread. They’re all different sizes, but I tell her that’s ok: some will be chewy and some crispy, but all will be delicious!

The smell of the orange zest wafts out of the oven mingling with the toasty biscuit/ Golden Syrup yumminess, mmmmm.

Best thing about these bikkies? They only take 15 minutes or so to cook! Just enough time to clean up and pop the kettle on.

Anzac biscuits done!

Ava’s Orange Anzac Biscuits

 1 cup rolled oats

1 cup plain flour

1 cup raw sugar (or white, or half brown, half white)

¾ cup desiccated coconut

125g butter

2 tablespoons golden syrup

½ teaspoon bicarbonate of soda

1 tablespoon boiling water

1 orange

 Preheat oven to 150°C.

 Combine oats, sifted flour, sugar and coconut in a large bowl. In a small saucepan, melt the butter and golden syrup over a gently heat. Mix the bicarb soda with boiling water, add to melted butter mixture and add this to the dry ingredients. Finely zest the orange and add the zest to the mixture. Stir until combined.

 Take a teaspoonful of mixture at a time and roll into small balls. Place these on a lightly greased oven tray and allow room to spread. Cook for about 15 -20 mins, until lovely and golden. Allow to cool on the trays and then eat!

Makes about 30. Try not to eat all in one setting like we did.

Proof of the Anzac is in the eating...

Categories: Family, Food | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

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