Posts Tagged With: eggs

Kale, potato and egg soup

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Amazing what you can put in a soup isn’t it? Sounds very simple this one, but the flavours and bold and bright at the end. And it’s perfect for this freezing, wintry and blustery day…

Fresh from the garden: potatoes, garlic, kale, eggs
Recipe source: adapted from a recipe on thekitchn.com
Serves: 4 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Chopping boards & knives
  • Garlic press
  • Measures: tablespoon, teaspoon
  • Medium stockpot
  • 4 little bowls or ramekins
  • Ladle
  • Microplane grater
  • 4 serving bowls

 

Ingredients:

  • 2 medium yellow potatoes
  • 3 garlic cloves
  • 1 teaspoon cooking salt
  • 1.5 litres water
  • 2 tablespoons bouillon
  • 1 bunch kale (about 15 big leaves)
  • 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar
  • 4 large eggs
  • Flaked salt and pepper
  • 20g grana padano or parmesan cheese
  • Extra-virgin olive oil

What to do:

  1. Scrub the potatoes then chop it onto centimetre cubes. Peel the garlic cloves and squeeze them through the garlic press.
  2. Add potato, garlic, salt, water and bouillon to a medium stockpot over medium-high heat. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to simmer.
  3. While the potatoes start to cook, wash the kale and shake dry over the sink. Remove any thick, tough stems and chop them into tiny pieces. Add the chopped stems to the pot with the potatoes and simmer for 2 minutes.
  4. Stack the leaves of kale on top of each other. Slice them crosswise into thin ribbons, and add them to the pot with the potatoes and kale stems. If necessary, add more stock or water to the pot to just about cover the kale.
  5. Cover the pot and let the soup cook for 8 to 10 minutes. The soup is ready when the potatoes are easily pierced with a fork, and when a ribbon of kale has become tender, but has not yet become stringy or pulpy. Stir in the vinegar. Taste and season with more salt and fresh cracked pepper. Also add more stock or water if a more liquid soup is desired.
  6. To finish, crack the eggs into little bowls, and then gently slide them into the soup. Ladle some of the soup broth on top of the eggs to submerge them. Put the lid back on the pot and cook for 4 minutes. When done, the whites of the eggs should be opaque, but the yolk should still be soft. If the eggs break into the soup before they are poached, just use a fork to swirl them into the soup.
  7. Carefully spoon the eggs into a soup bowls. Ladle the soup on top. Finish with a grating of grana padano cheese and a thin drizzle of olive oil and serve.

Notes: What else could you put into a soup? What else could you use instead of kale?

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Veggie patch and feta frittate

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So we come to the last weeks of term and need to use up a little bit of this and bit of that growing in the garden. This recipe is perfect to do just that!

Fresh from the garden: eggplant, squash, capsicum, eggs, rocket, parsley
Recipe source: Melissa
Makes: 30 individual frittate

Equipment:

  • Pastry brush
  • 3 x 12-hole large cupcake tins
  • Mixing bowls – 2 large, 2 med
  • Chopping board & knives
  • Potato peeler
  • Salad spinner & paper towel
  • Large frying pan or wok
  • Grater, scales
  • Wooden spoon
  • Tongs, whisk
  • Serving plates
Ingredients:

  • A small selection of ripe veggies: eggplant, squash, capsicum, leek
  • 1 large sweet potato
  • Large handful of rocket
  • Small handful marjoram and parsley
  • Olive oil
  • Flaked salt and black pepper
  • 200g feta cheese
  • 25g parmesan
  • 12 large eggs
   

What to do:

 

  1. Preheat the oven to 180C. Pour a little olive oil into one cupcake hole in each tin and using the pastry brush, spread it into 30 of the holes.
  2. Peel the sweet potato, and then chop flesh evenly into 1cm cubes. Wash the others veggies and chop into thin slices or small cubes.
  3. Wash the rocket leaves in several changes of water and spin dry. Chop the stalks and leaves into very thin ribbons.
  4. Wash the herbs and pat dry with paper towel. Strip the leaves from the stalks & chop finely.
  5. Heat the frying pan with the oil and toss in the sweet potato, leek and veggies. Season well with salt and pepper. Cook, turning occasionally, for about 4 minutes over medium heat until the cubes are just tender and lightly golden at the sides. Add in the rest of the veggies and cook for another few minutes, then add the rocket and cook until wilted.
  6. Meanwhile, cut the feta into small cubes and grate the parmesan.
  7. Then add the cubed feta and gently stir to mix in.
  8. In the large bowl, lightly beat the eggs with the herbs, parmesan, a pinch of salt and a grind of pepper.
  9. Divide the veggie and feta mixture evenly into the cupcake holes, spoon the eggy herb mixture over and bake in 180C oven for about 20 minutes.
  10. Carefully prise out with a plastic knife if sticking, then divide onto serving plates.

 Notes: Why do we need to preheat the oven? What is feta cheese? What does to prise mean?

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End of Year salad

This is where we clean out the garden in preparation for the big break… what better to do than throw it all in together?

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Fresh from the garden: all the last veggies of the year…
Recipe source: Melissa

Equipment:

  • Mortar and pestle
  • Citrus juicer
  • Measures: 1/3 cup, teaspoon
  • Teaspoon
  • Scissors
  • Paper towel
  • 2 baking trays
  • Bowls – 2 big, med, 4 small
  • Salad spinner
  • Chopping boards and knives
  • A deep-sided frying pan
  • Slotted spoon

 

 

Ingredients:

  • Kale
  • Cucumbers
  • Salad leaves
  • Bok choy or tatsoi
  • Tomatoes
  • 4 eggs

Herby vinaigrette dressing

  • 1 clove garlic
  • Flaked salt & black pepper
  • 1 lemon
  • 1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • A small handful mixed herbs: tarragon, marjoram, thyme, chives, salad burnet

What to do:

  1. For the dressing: Peel the garlic clove and put it in the mortar with a large pinch of salt. Gently pound to a paste. Juice the lemon and add the juice to the mortar (without pips) then stir the lot with the teaspoon and scrape it into the large bowl. Stir in the oil and grind some pepper, then whisk the dressing lightly. Wash and spin dry the herbs, pick off the leaves and snip finely with the scissors. Add to the dressing.
  2. For the crispy kale: Preheat oven to 180C. Wash the kale really well, checking for bugs or cocoons, and using scissors, cut the leaves from the stalks in large pieces. Spin leaves dry in the salad spinner, then dry extra well with paper towel, then place in a bowl and add in a few pinches of flaked salt and drizzle of olive oil. Massage all the flavour into the kale for a minute, then lay out on the baking trays and slide into the oven for 5 to 7 minutes until crispy.
  3. For the salad: Fill up the 2 big bowls with cold water & wash the salad leaves in several changes of water. Spin dry and wipe the bowls dry. Fill the small bowl with water and wash the small garnishing leaves and flowers. Reserve them carefully on a piece of paper towel then keep separate in the bowl.
  4. Wash the tomatoes and drain and then slice any large ones in half without squashing! Wash the cucumbers, peel alternating strips of each one and then slice into thin discs.
  5. To poach eggs: Fill the deep-sided frying pan 5cm deep with water and bring to a simmer. Fill the large bowl with cold water. Carefully crack each egg into a small bowl without breaking it and then carefully slide into the water. Let the pan sit for 4 minutes on the lowest heat before removing each egg into the bowl of cold water with a slotted spoon and reserving until needed.
  6. Add the salad leaves to the bowl with the herbs and the dressing. Gently turn the leaves in the dressing using a clean hand without squishing the leaves.
  7. Pile up the dressed leaves into the serving bowls with the  tomatoes and cucumber, sprinkle over the crispy kale, then carefully drain an egg and place in each bowl with the garnishing petals. Serve immediately.
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Leafy salad with poached eggs, kale and herby mayo

ourkitchengarden.net

The list of ingredients we can add to a salad is endless… here at Bondi we base our salads on lettuce leaves, fresh herbs and then seasonal additions. This one is a favourite with just-poached eggs and a wonderfully creamy and tangy dressing, but the key is to show the children how to handle delicate lettuce leaves without crushing or bruising them (the lettuce, not the kids…) and the gentle art of cracking an egg without destroying the yolk!

Fresh from the garden: Lettuce, eggs, kale, edible flowers, spring onions, garlic, lemon, herbs

Recipe source: Melissa

Serves: 6 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

·       Mixing bowls – large, medium, small

·       2 salad spinners

·       Tea towels and paper towel

·       Chopping boards & knives

·       Saucepan and lid

·       Deep-sided non-stick frying pan

·       Slotted spoon

·       Stick blender &its cup

·       Measuring: jug, ½ cup, teaspoon

·       Scales

·       Scissors

·       Garlic press

·       Citrus juicer

·       Serving bowls

Ingredients:

  • 4 freshest eggs (plus two for the mayo)
  • A bunch of salad leaves & kale
  • A large handful of herbs
  • A few garnishing flowers
  • Any extras like radishes
  • White wine vinegar & olive oil

For the herby mayonnaise:

  • A small handful fresh herbs
  • 1 juicy lemon
  • 1 small garlic clove
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 1/2 cup rice bran oil
  • Flaked salt & black pepper

What to do:

For the salad:

  1. Fill up the 2 big bowls with cold water & wash the salad leaves in several changes of water. Spin the leaves dry and wipe the bowls dry.
  2. Lay out the tea towel and line it with kitchen paper. Spread the salad leaves over the paper and roll the whole lot up like a log. Keep the rolled parcel of leaves in the fridge until needed.
  3. Reserve the small garnishing leaves and flowers in a separate little bowl of cold water.
  4. Wash the kale and shake dry. Snip the leaves from the stalks and discard the stalks. Spin dry thoroughly, then put in a clean dry bowl, drizzle a little olive oil and a pinch of salt, and then massage the salty oil into the leaves with your fingers for 5 minutes.
  5. Fill up another bowl with water and wash the herbs. Spin the herbs dry and pick leaves, reserving in their own small bowl, discarding stalks into compost.
  6. Scrub the radishes and then finely slice using a sharp knife or a mandoline slicer. 

For the mayo:

  1. Meanwhile for the mayo, wash the herbs in a few changes of water, spin them dry and finely strip off leaves from the stalks (coriander stalks you can leave in).
  2. Cut the lemon in half and juice the halves. You will need 2 tablespoons lemon juice in total.
  3. Smash the garlic clove, peel it and squeeze it through the garlic press.
  4. Carefully separate the eggs and reserve the yolks in a small bowl.
  5. Into the stick blender cup add the egg yolks, the mustard and 2 teaspoons only of the lemon juice. Whizz together until all is combined.
  1. Measure the rice bran oil, then get a friend to help measure in the oil a tablespoon at a time every 30 seconds into the egg mixture while you are whizzing (this takes a few minutes so don’t rush it).
  2. Then slowly add in another 2 teaspoons of lemon juice, the pressed garlic, the herbs and a good sprinkle of salt and pepper. Blend until smooth. Taste and check if it needs any more lemon juice or salt and adjust if needed.

To poach the eggs:

  1. Fill the deep-sided frying pan with water to a depth of about 10cm, then bring it to the boil and then turn down to a bare simmer.
  2. Then break the eggs into separate little bowls, then slide them into the simmering water, one at a time until they’re all in, and let them cook, uncovered, for 4 minutes. Fill a large bowl with cold water.
  3. Then use a draining spoon to lift them from the water and transfer them to the bowl of cold water if you’re not ready to use them just yet.

To serve:

  1. Strip the kale leaves into smaller pieces and add them to the separate bowl. Drizzle over a little olive oil and pinch of flaked salt and then using your fingertips, rub it all in to the kale leaves to make them soft.
  2. Take the lettuce from the fridge and chop into smaller strips. Pop them into a big bowl, then drizzle about a teaspoon of olive oil, a teaspoon of white wine vinegar & a sprinkle of flaked salt over the whole lot.
  3. Add the kale into the lettuce and using your hands, turn the leaves to coat in the dressing and then divide the lot among your serving bowls.
  4. Spoon an egg at a time out of the water and dry off with some paper towel or a clean tea towel, and then carefully arrange one egg on the top of each salad.
  5. Drizzle the mayo over the top of each salad, followed by a sprinkle of herbs and the flowers and serve immediately!

Notes: What is mayo short for? What other salad dressings could you use? Why do we need to wash the leaves so well? Why do we roll the leaves up to put them in the fridge? Why don’t we always need to use vinegar to poach the eggs? Why do we put the eggs into cold water?

ourkitchengarden.net

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Winter salad with poached eggs and roasted bits

We tend to veer towards slow-braised soups and stews in the winter, but I also love warm salads, blending crisp and green with warm and comforting, all in the one bowl…

Fresh from the garden: salad leaves, eggs, lemon, parsley, marjoram, thyme, coriander, chives
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 6 or 24 at home

Equipment:

  • Mixing bowls
  • Colander
  • Paper towel, tea towel
  • Chopping boards & knives
  • Measures:1/3 cup, tablespoon
  • 2 large baking trays
  • 2 salad spinners
  • Mortar & pestle
  • Citrus juicer
  • Mezzaluna
  • Whisk, tongs
  • Medium frying pan
  • Slotted spoon
  • Serving bowls

 

Ingredients:

  • A handful Brussels sprouts leaves
  • A handful cauliflower florets
  • A big bunch salad leaves: mache, mizuna, rocket, lettuce
  • A large handful of herbs
  • A few garnishing flowers
  • 4 eggs
  • Ground coriander and cumin

Herby vinaigrette dressing

  • 1 clove garlic
  • Flaked salt & black pepper
  • 1 lemon
  • 1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • A small handful mixed herbs: parsley, marjoram, thyme, coriander, chives

What to do:

  • Preheat the oven the 180C.Wash the Brussels sprout leaves and cauliflower in a bowl of cold water, refilling if needed. Drain and pat dry with paper towel. Strip the leaves from the stalks and cut into ribbons. Cut the cauli into smaller florets. Turn the cauliflower into a clean dry bowl and sprinkle over a tablespoon of olive oil, a sprinkle of salt, ground coriander and ground cumin and mix to combine. Place on the baking tray and then add the Brussels sprout leaves, add another tablespoon of olive oil and sprinkle of salt etc. to the bowl. Lay the leaves out on a separate baking tray.
  • Roast the cauliflower for 20 minutes, then slide the tray of Brussels sprout leaves into the oven and roast for a further 5 to 10 minutes, removing when crispy.
  • Fill up 2 big bowls with cold water & wash the salad leaves in several changes of water. Spin dry and wipe the bowls dry. Lay out the tea towel and line it with kitchen paper. Spread the salad leaves over the paper and roll the whole lot up like a log. Keep the rolled parcel of leaves in the fridge until needed.
  • Fill up a medium bowl with water and wash the herbs and small garnishing leaves. Spin dry and pick leaves, discarding stalks into compost. Pick the petals from the flowers and reserve in a small bowl with the garnishing leaves. Chop the herbs finely and keep separate in their own small bowl.
  • Peel the garlic clove and put it in the mortar with a large pinch of salt. Pound to a paste. Juice the lemon and add the juice to the mortar (without pips) then stir the lot with a teaspoon and scrape it into a clean bowl. Stir in the oil and grind some pepper, then whisk the dressing lightly. Wash and spin dry the herbs, pick off the leaves and chop finely in the mezzaluna. Add to the dressing.
  • Meanwhile, to poach eggs, fill the medium sized frying pan with water and bring to a simmer. Carefully crack each egg into its own small bowl without breaking it and then carefully slide into the water. Let the pan sit for 4 minutes on the barest simmer until done.
  • Carefully remove oven tray of veggies with oven mitts and leave to cool for a few minutes.
  • Unwrap the parcel of salad leaves & tip them into the bowl with the herbs and the dressing. Add in the roasted cauliflower & sprout leaves and gently turn the leaves in the dressing using a clean hand or tongs.
  • Pile up the dressed leaves into the serving bowls, carefully drain an egg using a slotted spoon and place in the centre of each bowl of salad with garnishing petals or leaves and serve immediately.

Notes: What else could you add to a warm winter salad? What is the best way of using a mortar and pestle? What does ground coriander smell like? How is it made?

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Silverbeet and ricotta tart

This is an open tart filled with a lovely soft silverbeet mixture. To save time, we use the pastry dough made by the class before, and then make the pastry for the next class.

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: silverbeet, marjoram, eggs, onion, lemon
Recipe source: adapted by Melissa from the recipe in The Silver Spoon
Serves: 6 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Rolling pin
  • 26cm tart tin
  • Fork
  • Aluminium foil
  • Baking beans
  • Oven mitts
  • Chopping boards & knives
  • Mixing bowls – selection
  • Large frying pan
  • Whisk
  • Measuring cups – 1, ½, ¼
  • Scales
  • Large metal spoon
  • Microplane grater
  • Food processor
  • Cling film
  • Serving plates

 

Ingredients:

Italian shortcrust pastry

  • 1 lemon
  • 200g plain flour plus extra for rolling
  • 100g cold unsalted butter
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tablespoon iced water

Tart filling

  • An onion
  • 6 silverbeet stalks & leaves
  • 3 sprigs marjoram
  • 30g unsalted butter
  • 3 free-range eggs
  • 1 cup milk
  • ¼ cup cream
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • 1 nutmeg
  • 100g ricotta

What to do:

Blind baking the pastry:

  • Preheat oven to 180C.
  • Roll out pastry onto floured surface to approximately 4mm thick.Rolling the pastry onto a rolling pin, lift it gently into the tart tin, and prick all over with a fork. Place a sheet of foil to cover the pastry, empty in the baking beans and blind bake in the oven for 15 minutes.

Preparing the tart:

  • Finely chop the onion and thoroughly wash the silverbeet. Wash, dry & pick the marjoram leaves.
  • Melt the butter in the large frying pan over medium/low heat. Add the onion and cook gently on a low heat, stirring regularly for 5 minutes.
  • Meanwhile shake off the excess water from the silverbeet, and slice it (including the stalks) finely. Add it to the frying pan and cook, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes or so until it’s wilted but the leaves are still deep green. (If there is liquid in the base of the pan, briefly increase the heat to boil it off.) Turn off the heat. Set aside.
  • Whisk the eggs in the large bowl to break them up. Weigh the ricotta then push it through the sieve into the bowl then stir in the milk, cream, and a little salt, pepper and a grate of nutmeg. Stir in the silverbeet and the marjoram.
  • Using the oven mitts, remove the tart shell from the oven and let it cool for a few minutes. Pull off the beans (reserving them for future use) & discard the foil.
  • Using the large metal spoon, spread the silverbeet mixture evenly over the base of the tart shell.
  • Bake the tart for about 30 minutes until it is golden and lightly set. Use this time to make the pastry for the next class.
  • After 30 minutes is up, check the tart by inserting the tip of a knife into the middle and gently pressing the sides of the cut apart. The filling should be softly set with no liquid running into the cut.
  • Remove it from the oven and leave it to cool and settle for a few minutes before serving. Then just slip off the outer ring of the tin, gently slide the tart onto a clean chopping board to slice before placing onto your serving plates.

To make the pastry:

  • Carefully zest the lemon using the microplane grater.
  • For the pastry sift the flour and add to salt in food processor. Chop the butter and add to flour mixture – whiz until mixture resembles fine breadcrumbs.
  • Sprinkle in the zest and pulse to incorporate.
  • Separate the egg and add the yolk only to processor with the cold water and motor running.
  • As soon as the pastry resembles a ball, take out of processor. Flatten dough to form a disc and wrap in cling film. Refrigerate for at least an hour.

Notes: What else could be used in the filling instead of silverbeet? Why do we ‘blind bake’ & what does it mean? What does ‘shortcrust’ mean?

ourkitchengarden.net

 

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Bush tucker: Pigface and mushroom omelettes

Pigface is also called karkalla or bush bananas & grows everywhere along the Eastern seaboard. Have a look next time you’re down at the beach!

ourkitchengarden.net

Foraged bush tucker food: pigface/ karkalla
Recipe source: Melissa
Makes: 4 omelettes

Equipment:

  • Paper towel
  • Chopping boards and knives
  • 1 large, 1 medium & 4 small mixing bowls
  • Garlic press
  • Colander
  • Fork, butter knife
  • A large wok
  • A non-stick frying pan
  • Wooden spoon with straight end
  • Egg slice
  • Serving plates
Ingredients:

  • A large handful of mushrooms
  • A clove of garlic
  • A large handful pigface
  • 8 eggs
  • Flaked salt & black pepper
  • 50g butter
  • Olive oil

What to do:

  • Trim the mushrooms of any dirt and wipe clean with a damp piece of paper towel. Chop into thin slices and reserve in a large bowl.
  • Peel the garlic clove and squeeze through the garlic press into the mushrooms.
  • Wash the pigface in a large bowl of cold water and drain. Pick through and discard any damaged ends and reserve the rest. Chop any large pieces into smaller slices.
  • Break 2 of the eggs at a time into each small bowl, season with salt and pepper and whisk lightly with a fork.
  • Heat a small knob of butter and a tablespoon of olive oil in the wok over medium heat until foaming. Add in the mushrooms and garlic and carefully toss a few times to cover in the butter mixture. Sprinkle in a few pinches of salt, a grind of pepper, and then sauté for 2 minutes until slippery.
  • Add the pigface to the wok and toss for another minute.
  • Add another small knob of butter to the frying pan and then when foaming, pour in one of the bowls of whisked egg mixture and gently tilt the pan to distribute. Cook for 20 seconds or so on a low heat, until it begins to bubble, then draw the egg into the centre with the wooden spoon and rotate the pan again to redistribute the uncooked egg.
  • The omelette is cooked when the base is set, but is still slightly runny in the middle.
  • Slide a quarter of the mushroom and pigface onto one half of one omelette, fold the other half over with the egg slice to form a half-moon and slice out on to one of the serving plates.
  • Repeat with the remaining omelettes and the rest of the mushroom mixture, and serve!

Notes: What does pigface look like and where does it grow?

ourkitchengarden.net

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Poached egg salad with peas and basil mayo

We love making mayonnaise at Bondi and always talk about the difference in flavour from the ready-bought stuff! This salad is wonderful – creamy from the mayo and egg yolk but also tangy from the dressed lettuce – and it’s so worth fetching some fresh peas to pod as they really pop in your mouth!

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: lettuce, eggs, peas, basil, salad burnet, lemon, garlic
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 4 at home or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Small saucepan
  • Colander
  • Medium high-sided frying pan
  • Bowls – 3 large, at least 4 small
  • Salad spinner
  • Paper towel & tea towel
  • Citrus juicer
  • Chopping boards and knives, scissors
  • Measures: tablespoon, teaspoon, ½ teaspoon
  • Stick blender & its cup
  • Measuring jug, fork
  • Slotted spoon
  • Serving plates

 

 

Ingredients:

  • A handful of fresh peas in the shell
  • 4 eggs
  • 2 large handfuls of lettuce
  • A handful salad burnet

For the basil mayonnaise:

  • A small branch of basil leaves
  • 1 egg
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1 small clove garlic
  • 1 level teaspoon mustard powder
  • 120ml rice bran oil
  • 25ml olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon white wine vinegar
  • 1 lemon
  • Freshly milled black pepper

What to do:

For the salad:

  • Fill the small saucepan up with water and set it to boil. Pod the peas and have ready a big bowl of cold water. When the water is boiling, add the podded peas and cook for 3 minutes. Drain and refresh in the bowl of cold water. Drain and reserve.
  • Separate out the lettuce leaves over the sink and rinse under the tap.Fill up a big bowl with cold water & wash the iceberg leaves in several changes of water, looking for any dirt in the bottom of the bowl. Spin dry in small batches.
  • Lay out the tea towel and line it with kitchen paper. Spread the salad leaves over the paper and roll the whole lot up like a log. Keep the rolled parcel of leaves in the fridge until needed.
  • Wash and spin dry the burnet and strip off the leaves, discarding the stalks. Wrap them carefully in paper towel and keep them in the fridge with the lettuce.

For the mayonnaise:

  • Wash, spin dry and separate off the basil leaves and discard the stalks into the compost.
  • Cut the lemon in half and squeeze one half to yield ½ teaspoon lemon juice. Peel the garlic clove and finely slice.
  • Now break the egg into the cup of the stock blender, add the salt, garlic, mustard powder and a few twists of freshly milled black pepper, thenblitz to blend these together.
  • Now measure the oils into the jug, mix well with a fork and ask a helper to pour it in a thin trickle into the cup whilst it’s blending. When all the oil is in, add the vinegar, lemon juice and basil leaves, then blend again until the leaves are quite finely chopped.

To poach the eggs:

  • Fill a medium-sized frying pan with water to a depth of approximately 5cm, heat it up to the boil, then lower the heat it to a bare simmer.
  • Then break the 4 eggs into the four separate small bowls taking care not to break the yolks and removing any shell with your fingertips. Then lower them, one at a time, into the simmering water and let them cook together, uncovered, for 4 minutes. Fill a large bowl with cold water.
  • Then, use the slotted spoon to lift them from the water and transfer them to the bowl of cold water, until you are ready to use them.

To serve:

  • Bring the lettuce out of the fridge, gently slice up the leaves if needed and put into a big mixing bowl. Drizzle a teaspoon each of olive oil and white wine vinegar over the leaves with a pinch of salt and grind of pepper, and turn gently to combine.
  • Arrange the leaves on each serving plate.
  • Holding a clean tea towel in one hand, scoop up an egg with the slotted spoon and carefully drain of water. Arrange a poached egg in the centre of each salad plate, drizzle some of the mayonnaise over the top of each salad, followed by a sprinkle of the peas and then the salad burnet leaves.
  • Serve.

Notes:Why do we add a trickle of oil at first into the egg mixture of the mayonnaise? Why shouldn’t we break the eggs when poaching them? What is salad burnet and what does it smell like?

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Cheese and spring onion souffles

This classic comfort food recipe has appeared on this blog in a slightly different version of two cheeses souffle – but this version with spring onions has gone down a treat, even if we do say so ourselves…

Fresh from the garden: eggs, spring onion
Recipe source: adapted from a recipe on bbcgoodfood.com
Serves: 5 at home or 25 tastes

ourkitchengarden.net

Equipment:

  • 5 x 250ml ramekins or soufflé dishes
  • Baking paper & string
  • Scissors
  • Baking tray
  • Scales
  • Paper towel, pot holders
  • Bowls – 1 large, 5 small
  • Saucepan
  • Wooden spoon
  • Measuring jug
  • Stand mixer and bowl
  • Metal spoon
  • 4 under-plates to serve
Ingredients:

  • 25g butter plus extra to grease the ramekins
  • 100g feta cheese
  • 100g parmesan
  • 2 or 3 spring onions
  • 5 eggs
  • 25g flour
  • 250ml milk
  • Flaked salt & black pepper

What to do:

  • Heat the oven to 200C. Butter the ramekins.
  • Make a collar for each ramekin by tearing a 40cm length of baking paper, folding it into thirds, and buttering one side. Then roll it around the ramekin, buttered side in, and tying with string to secure. Place them on the baking tray when done.
  • Measure the parmesan, then grate it. Crumble the feta cheese.
  • Wash the spring onions and pat dry with paper towel. Strip off the tough outer layer and trim the roots and tops. Finely chop them into thin discs to yield about 2 tablespoons.
  • Carefully separate each of the eggs, putting the whites into the very clean and dry bowl of the stand mixer, and reserving the yolks in a small bowl.
  • Melt 25g butter in the saucepan, stir in the flour and gently cook on a low heat for a minute or so. Slowly add the milk, stirring all the time to make a thick sauce. Cook for a couple of minutes to cook out the flour.
  • Stir in the cheeses and spring onions then add 4 of the egg yolks, season generously and mix well.
  • Whisk the egg whites until they are stiff and form soft peaks.
  • Using a metal spoon, start folding the egg whites into the cheese mixture carefully – begin by using about 1/3 of the whites first and then adding the rest once combined – and pour into the buttered soufflé dishes.
  • Cook for 12–15 minutes until the soufflés are risen and golden.
  • Using pot holders, carefully place a soufflé on to an lined underplate and serve TOUT SUITE!

Notes: What is a ramekin? Why do we separate the egg yolks and whites? Why do we need to cook out the flour? Where does the word soufflé come from?

ourkitchengarden.net

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Dragon’s tongue beans with basil aioli

Herby? Garlicky? Yup, ticks all the boxes… yum yum yum! Hooray for mayonnaise! You can use any long beans for this – we were juts lucky to have a few brightly coloured Dragon’s Tongue beans to use alongside some runner beans.

Fresh from the garden: Dragon’s tongue beans (and other long beans) lemon, eggs, basil, garlic
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 2 as a side dish

ourkitchengarden.net

Equipment:

  • Small saucepan and lid
  • Colander
  • Salad spinner
  • Scissors
  • Bowls – large, small
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Citrus juicer
  • Garlic press
  • Stick blender & cup
  • Measuring – jug, ½ cup, tablespoon, teaspoon
  • Serving bowls
Ingredients:

  • A handful of dragon’s tongue beans
  • Cooking salt
  • A small handful basil
  • 1 juicy lemon
  • 1 small garlic clove
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 1/2 cup rice bran oil
  • Flaked salt & black pepper

What to do:

  • Fill up the saucepan with cold water, put the lid on and set to boil.
  • Wash and drain the beans, then snip off the stalk end.
  • When the water in saucepan is boiling, add a teaspoon of salt and the whole beans. Cook the beans for 3 minutes, then drain and refresh in a bowl of cold water. Drain again.
  • Meanwhile for the aioli, pick the basil leaves, wash them well, spin them dry and finely snip with scissors into 5mm ribbons.
  • Cut the lemon in half and juice a half.
  • Smash the garlic clove, peel it and squeeze it through the garlic press.
  • Carefully separate one egg and reserve the yolk in a small bowl.
  • Into the stick blender cup add the whole egg, the egg yolk, the mustard and a teaspoon of lemon juice. Whizz together until all is combined.
  • Measure the rice bran oil, then get a friend to help super-slowly stream in the oil into the egg mixture while you are whizzing (this takes a few minutes so don’t rush it).
  • To make this mayo into an aioli, slowly add in another teaspoon of lemon juice, the pressed garlic, the chopped basil and a good sprinkle of salt and pepper. Blend until smooth. Taste and check if it needs any more lemon juice or salt and adjust if needed.
  • Divide the beans among serving plates and drizzle the mayo over one end of each plate and serve.
  • Any spare aioli can be stored in an air-tight glass jar in the fridge for 3 days.

Notes: What is aioli? Why is it different to mayonnaise? What else could you serve it with? What could you make with the leftover egg whites?

 

Categories: Kitchen Garden, Recipe | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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