Posts Tagged With: eggs

Sean’s linguine with shredded rocket, lemon, chilli and parmesan

This dish has been a staple on Sean’s menu since he opened in 1993, and continues to be one of the most popular dishes… a simple dish; great produce being the most important thing!

From the garden: rocket, lemon, chillies, garlic
Recipe source: adapted from the recipe by Sean Moran at Sean’s Panaroma in ‘Let It Simmer’
Serves: 6 at home or 24 tastes

ourkitchengarden.net

Equipment:

  • Large stockpot
  • 2 large bowls
  • Chopping board
  • Grater, citrus juicer
  • Measuring jug, tablespoon
  • Scales
  • Tongs
  • Serving bowls

 

Ingredients:

  • 500g linguine
  • 5 generous handfuls rocket
  • 100g parmesan (preferably Parmigiano or grana padano)
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 1 lemon
  • 1 tablespoon chilli oil (see separate recipe)
  • 100ml extra-virgin olive oil
  • Salt & freshly ground pepper

What to do:

  • Three-quarters fill the large stockpot with cold water and bring to the boil.
  • Wash and spin dry and then coarsely shred the rocket into ribbons with a sharp knife.
  • Weigh to measure then coarsely grate the parmesan.
  • Squeeze and strain the juice from the lemon, then squeeze the garlic through the press and combine with lemon juice, chilli oil and olive oil in a bowl large enough to toss the linguine (you may need 2 bowls, so then divide the mixture between them).
  • Throw a handful of salt into the boiling water and let it return to the boil. Cook pasta until al dente – fresh pasta should take about one minute – then lift it into the prepared bowl with tongs, draining it as you go yet taking a slight drizzle of the cooking water with the pasta (this will lubricate and combine dressing).
  • Add the shredded rocket and parmesan, then season and toss together just before serving.
  • Divide into your serving bowls and eat immediately!

Notes: What is rocket also known as? What does to shred mean? What does al dente mean?

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Quinoa tabbouleh with poached eggs

White quinoa is the most common variety, but red quinoa is also available and has a nuttier flavour. They can be used interchangeably. Quinoa is a fabulous alternative to grains and is gluten-free.

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: basil, parsley, lemons, mint, cucumbers, tomatoes
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 4 or 24 tastes 

Equipment:

  • Stockpot with lid
  • Measures: cup, ½ cup, tablespoon, teaspoon, ¼ teaspoon
  • Wooden spoon, fork, teaspoon
  • Salad spinner
  • Microplane zester
  • Citrus juicer
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Peeler
  • Bowls – large, medium& 4 small
  • Measuring jug
  • Serving bowls
  • Deep-sided frying pan
  • Tea towel

 

 

 

 

Ingredients:

Cook quinoa:

  • 1 cup quinoa
  • 1½ cups water
  • 1 teaspoon cooking salt

Make tabbouleh:

  • 4 large handfuls of parsley (about 2 cups when chopped)
  • 1 large handful mint leaves (about ½ cup when chopped)
  • 1 large handful basil leaves (about ½ cup when chopped)
  • 1 teaspoon flaked salt plus extra
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 lemons
  • 1 medium cucumber
  • 2 medium tomatoes
  • ½ cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 4 fresh eggs

What to do:

  • Toast quinoa in a stockpot over gentle heat, stirring frequently until fragrant for about 6 minutes. Add the water and 1 teaspoon salt and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, cover, and simmer until grains are tender, about 15 minutes. Remove from heat and let stand, covered, for 10 minutes, then fluff with a fork and let cool to room temperature.
  • Wash, spin dry and pick the leaves from the stems of the herbs and coarsely chop.
  • Zest one lemon then cut both lemons and squeeze through the citrus juicer to yield about 4 tablespoons juice.
  • Peel the cucumber, cut in half lengthways and scrape out the seeds with the teaspoon. Wash the tomatoes and wipe dry, then cut the cucumber and the tomatoes into small dice about ½cm square.
  • Add all the ingredients to the large bowl, measure the olive oil and pour into the bowl, mixing thoroughly to combine.
  • Meanwhile, to poach eggs, fill the medium sized frying pan 5cm deep with water and bring to a simmer. Carefully crack an egg into a small bowl without breaking it and then gently slide into the water one at a time until all four are in the water. Let the pan sit for 4 minutes at a bare simmer.
  • Divide the tabbouleh amongst serving bowls and using the slotted spoon, scoop up an egg, drain it quickly on a clean tea towel and pop on top of each bowl. Sprinkle with salt and serve!

ourkitchengarden.net

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Eggs ‘en cocotte’ Florentine

The classics keep coming back, and for good reason! Here’s an old-fashioned brekky/ brunch staple that is versatile, quick, easy and delish… You can add ham or even smoked salmon if you like!

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: spinach, shallots, spring onions, eggs, chives
Recipe source: inspired by a recipe in the Yvette Van Boven book Home Made
Serves: 8 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Kettle
  • Chopping boards and knives
  • Colander
  • Bowls – big, medium, small
  • Scales
  • Large frying pan
  • Microplane grater
  • 8 ovenproof ramekins
  • A small baking tray
  • Paper towel
  • Oven mitts
  • Serving plates
Ingredients:

  • A large handful spinach or silverbeet
  • 2 French shallots
  • A couple of spring onions
  • A whole nutmeg
  • Flaked salt and pepper
  • 8 eggs
  • 50g butter at room temperature
  • 100g double cream
  • A small handful chives

 

What to do:

  • Preheat the oven to 180C. Check there is a shelf in the middle of the oven. Fill the kettle and set to boil.
  • Wash the spinach or silverbeet leaves thoroughly and shake dry. Slice off the discard any thick stalks and slice the leaves into thin ribbons.
  • Peel and finely chop the shallots and wash, trim and slice the spring onions into tiny rings.
  • Heat 25g of the butter in the frying pan and add the chopped shallot and spring onions. Fry gently until soft, stirring, and then add the spinach, a sprinkle of salt and pepper and about half a nutmeg grated with the microplane. Sauté until wilted for about 2 minutes, then measure the cream, add it in and cook gently for about 5 minutes.
  • Meanwhile divide the rest of the butter between the ramekins and grease each one, placing them onto the baking tray as you go. Sprinkle each with pepper and salt, then using tongs divide the spinach mixture between the ramekins, pouring in a little creamy liquid as well.
  • Taking one egg at a time, break first into a small bowl and then slide one into each ramekin, taking care not to disturb the yolk. Once the tray of 8 is ready, place carefully onto the middle shelf, and with an adult’s help, pour enough hot water into the baking tray but outside the ramekins to halfway up the side of the ramekins.
  • Slide carefully into the oven and bake for 10 – 12 minutes, when the whites are set but yolks are still runny.
  • Place a napkin or piece of paper towel onto your serving plates, then taking care and using oven mitts, remove the tray from the oven and divide the ramekins between the plates.
  • Serve immediately with crunchy toast!

Notes: What does en cocotte mean? What does Florentine refer to? What is a ramekin?

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Rhubarb and rosewater Eton mess

A take on the classic English dessert with gorgeous contrasting textures & flavours: crunchy, soft, creamy, hard, sweet, acid… yum yum YUM!

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: strawberries, rhubarb, eggs
Recipe source: Adapted from a recipe by Sophie Dahl in The Delicious Miss Dahl
Serves: 12 at home

Equipment:

  • Kitchen Aid, whisk attachment
  • Scales
  • Large baking tray
  • Baking paper
  • Measures: teaspoon
  • Chopping board and knife
  • Saucepan
  • Wooden spoon
  • Frying pan
  • 2 serving plates

 

 

Ingredients:

For the meringues

  • 8 large eggs
  • 400g raw caster sugar
  • 1 pinch salt

For the rhubarb compote

  • 200ml boiling water
  • 120g raw caster sugar
  • 1kg rhubarb
  • 2 teaspoons rose water

For the cream

  • 500ml double cream
  • 1 vanilla pod
  • Almond slivers to serve

What to do:

  • First make the meringues. Preheat the oven to 120C. Separate the eggs.
  • In a clean bowl or mixer whisk the egg whites until they reach firm peaks.
  • Gradually mix in the sugar and salt and whisk well until the mixture is thick white and glossy. This should take about 7-8 minutes.
  • Line a large baking tray with non-stick baking paper – use a little dab of the meringue mixture to stick it down.
  • Spoon the mixture into blobs on your baking tray leaving a generous gap between them. Bake for 1 hour.
  • Whilst the meringues are baking, make the rhubarb compote. Wash the rhubarb and trim any leaves away. Chop into 3cm rounds.
  • In a pan, boil the water with the sugar and add the rhubarb when it starts bubbling. Stir and let it cook for about 5 minutes on a medium heat. When the rhubarb is tender, remove from the heat. Add the rose water and leave to the side.
  • Whip the cream until it forms soft peaks.
  • Split the vanilla pod down the middle and scrape out the seeds. Stir them into the whipped cream.
  • Place the cooled meringues on the serving plate, breaking a few of them up and leaving a few whole. Spoon the cream over the top, then drizzle the compote on top of the cream.
  • Lightly toast the almond slivers in a dry frying pan and sprinkle them over the top.
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Braised greens with harissa, preserved lemon and fried egg

Comfort food indeed! Spicy, yolky and slippery… everything I love in a dish. And don’t even talk about the vitamins!!

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: kale, silverbeet, spinach, garlic, eggs, lemons, capsicum
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 4 at home or 20 tastes

Equipment:

  • Chopping board and knife
  • Measures – cup, tablespoon
  • Thick-bottomed frying pan (or casserole dish) with lid
  • Wooden spoon, tongs
  • Egg slice
  • Serving bowls
Ingredients:

  • 1 big bunch of kale, silverbeet & spinach (about 500g in total)
  • Olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1 tablespoon harissa
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 preserved lemon
  • Flaked salt and pepper
  • 4 organic free-range eggs

What to do:

  • Wash all the leaves thoroughly and shake dry, then trim the kale of its stalks and your other greens of any tough or dry stems. Chop the greens into thick ribbons.
  • Peel the garlic and thinly slice.
  • With tongs, remove a preserved lemon from the jar and rinse under running water to remove the salt. Cut into quarters and carefully slice out the pith and seeds and discard. Finely slice the rind into slithers and reserve.
  • In the frying pan or casserole, heat 3 tablespoons of olive oil over medium heat. When it shimmers, add the greens. Use tongs to toss and coat in the oil.
  • After about 4 minutes, the greens should start to wilt, brown in spots, and cook down. Add the garlic and continue to sauté, tossing or stirring occasionally, another 2 minutes. Do not allow the garlic to brown.
  • Add the harissa and toss to distribute. Then add the cup of water. Bring the pan to a boil, scraping up any browned bits on the bottom. Cover, and simmer for about 10 minutes, until the thickest parts of the veggie stems are very tender and easily pierced with a knife.
  • In the final several minutes of cooking, add the slices of preserved lemon, tossing to incorporate them in the cooking liquid. You may need to add a little more water as you go.
  • Taste for salt and pepper and season, if necessary. Remove the greens from the heat and divide among your bowls.
  • Heat a little more oil in the pan and fry your eggs one or two at a time, placing one on top of each bowl of greens. Serve immediately!

Notes: What are preserved lemons and when did we make them? What is harissa? What other greens could you use?

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BASC Vacation Care Program K-1 Tuesday 1st October

So the little ones worked at the low tables and each of the four groups rolled out linguine, podded broad beans, squeezed lemon juice, prepared herbs and grated parmesan – and then made the pasta for the next class, before clearing and setting the tables and the eating it all up! Deelicious! They also shared a little simple salad too: a perfect holiday lunch!

Beetroot linguine with broad beans, lemon and garden herbs

Our Kitchen Garden students love making pasta – and this recipe sings of spring! It includes the dough mixture as well as instructions on how to use a pasta machine.

oourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: eggs, beetroot, lemon, marjoram, parsley, thyme
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 4 at home or 12 tastes

Equipment:

  • Salad spinner
  • Pasta machine
  • Scales, garlic press
  • Measures – teaspoon
  • Food processor
  • Plastic wrap
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Pastry brush, grater
  • Large stock pot & saucepan
  • Tongs, large & small bowls
  • Serving bowls
Ingredients:

  • 250g typo ‘00’ flour
  • 2 free-range eggs
  • 50g pureed beetroot (see below)
  • A handful of broad beans
  • A handful of freshly picked herbs
  • Extra-virgin olive oil
  • Half a lemon
  • A garlic clove
  • Flaked salt & black pepper
  • 20g parmesan

What to do:

To make the beetroot puree:

  • Scrub a large beetroot under running water, then pop in a saucepan, fill with cold water and then heat to boil for about an hour.
  • Insert a skewer to check if the beet is cooked and soft, then drain, rinse under cold water, and then when cool to handle, slip off the skin with your fingers.
  • Place cooked beetroot in the food processor and blitz until blended to a puree consistency. Freeze the remaining beetroot puree.

To make the pasta:

  • Place the large bowl on the scales, reset to zero then measure the flour in to it. Add the beetroot.
  • Crack the eggs carefully into the small bowl, discarding any shell, then add them to the flour. Mix thoroughly with the wooden spoon, then tip the dough onto a clean, dry workbench.
  • Knead the dough for a few minutes, then wrap it in plastic film and let it rest for 1 hour at room temperature.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________

  • Fill the large stockpot and the saucepan with water and set to boil on high with the lids on.
  • Fix the pasta machine to a suitable bench or table – if the surface is not thick enough you may need to place a thick book under the machine. Screw the clamp very tightly.
  • Clear a large space on the workbench alongside the pasta machine. All surfaces must be clean and dry. Press or roll the dough into a rectangle about 8 cm wide.
  • Set the rollers on the pasta machine to the widest setting and pass the dough through. The dough will probably look quite ragged at this stage. Fold it in 3, turn it 90 degrees and roll it through again. Go to the next-thickest setting and pass the dough through 3-4 times.
  • Continue in this manner (changing the settings and passing the dough through) until the dough has passed through the second thinnest setting. Don’t use the very thinnest setting, as the dough gets too fine and is hard to manage. If the dough gets too long to handle comfortably, cut it into 2-3 pieces using the large knife, and roll each piece separately.
  • Lay the pasta strips on a lightly floured surface & dust with a little more flour. Attach the pasta cutter to the machine and pass through the largest rollers, draping it in your hands to catch.
  • Carefully separate each strip and hang over a pole to dry.
  • Clean the pasta machine by brushing it with a dry, wide pastry brush & putting back in its box.

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To finish the dish:

  • Check that the stockpot & saucepan have been filled with water and are set on high to boil.
  • Pod the broad beans, discarding the outer shell into the compost and add beans to the boiling water. Fill a large bowl with cold water and have ready.
  • Boil the broad beans for 3 minutes, drain and then immediately refresh in the bowl of cold water. Drain again and double-pod by slipping the outer shell off into the compost. Put the beans into the big bowl.
  • Wash and dry the lemon and zest it. Cut the lemon in half and squeeze its juice into the big bowl too.
  • Peel the garlic clove and squeeze it through the garlic press into the bowl too.
  • Wash and spin dry the herbs and strip their leaves, chopping with the mezzaluna, then add them into the garlicky broad bean bowl.
  • Measure 2 tablespoons of olive oil into the bowl and sprinkle on a few pinches of flaked salt and toss to incorporate.
  • Measure the parmesan and grate what you need.
  • When the stockpot has started a fast boil, carefully gather your drying pasta on a large baking tray. Add a tablespoon of cooking salt and then the pasta to the pot, stir once and quickly put the lid back on.
  • As soon as the pot begins to boil again, take the lid off. The pasta should only take 1 or 2 minutes to cook from boiling. Taste to check – it’s important that the pasta remains al dente and is not overcooked!
  • Using tongs, carefully pull the pasta (and some of its cooking liquid) out and into the big lemony bowl, sprinkle half the parmesan on and toss thoroughly to incorporate.
  • Divide into serving bowls, sprinkle the remaining parmesan on and eat immediately!

Notes: Never wash the pasta machine – it will rust! Just brush down with a strong brush to remove the leftover dough.

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Mushroom and spinach omelette

This appears to be an easy recipe but many top chefs are judged by their ability to execute the perfect omelette! This recipe is almost a meal in itself…

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: eggs, spinach, mushrooms, garlic, chives, parsley, thyme
Recipe source: Melissa
Makes: 4 large omelettes (to feed about 24 people) 

Equipment:

  • Salad spinner
  • Bowls – large, 4 medium, small
  • Scissors
  • Fork, butter knife
  • 2 non-stick frying pans
  • A large wok
  • Wooden spoon
  • Garlic press
  • Tablespoon measure
  • Serving plates

Ingredients:

  • A large handful of mushrooms
  • A large bunch of spinach
  • A small handful: chives, parsley and thyme
  • 16 eggs
  • Flaked salt &black pepper
  • 50g butter
  • Olive oil

What to do:

  • Trim the mushrooms of any dirt and wipe clean with a damp piece of paper towel. Chop into thin slices and reserve in the medium bowl.
  • Peel the garlic clove and squeeze through the garlic press in to the mushrooms.
  • Wash the spinach in several changes of water, then shake dry. Roll up and chop into fine ribbons.
  • Wash and carefully dry the herbs, keeping then separate and picking off the leaves. Discard any stalks, and add the thyme to the mushrooms.Using the scissors, snip the chives and reserve in a small bowl. Finely chop the parsley and reserve in a separate bowl.
  • Break 4 of the eggs into each medium bowl, add a quarter of the chives and parsley to each, then whisk lightly with a fork and season with salt and pepper. 
  • Heat 25g butter and 2 tablespoons of olive oil in the wok over medium heat until foaming. Add in the mushrooms, thyme and garlic and carefully toss a few times to cover in the butter mixture. Sprinkle in a few pinches of salt, a grind of pepper, and then sauté until slippery.
  • Add a quarter of the chopped spinach to the wok and heat through until wilted and the liquid has cooked off.
  • Add a quarter of the remaining butter to each of the 2 frying pans and then when foaming, pour one of the bowls of whisked egg mixture to each and gently rotate the pan to distribute. Cook for 20 seconds or so, until it begins to bubble, then draw the egg into the centre with the wooden spoon and rotate the pan again to redistribute the uncooked egg.
  • The omelettes are cooked when the base is set, but is still slightly runny in the middle.
  • Slide a quarter of the mushroom and spinach mixture onto one half of one omelette, fold the other half over to form a half-moon and slice out on to your serving plate.
  • Repeat with the remaining 2 omelettes and the rest of the mushroomy spinach, and serve!

 Notes: In what other languages can you say omelette? Why do we leave the omelette slightly runny in the middle? Where does the word omelette come from?

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Omelettes aux champignons

This appears to be an easy recipe but many top chefs are judged by their ability to execute the perfect omelette! At home you can insert a little gruyere cheese or sliced ham, but we like it here with our garlicky, slippery mushrooms.

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: eggs, mushrooms, garlic, chives, parsley, marjoram
Recipe source: Melissa
Makes: 1 omelette

Equipment:

  • Salad spinner
  • Bowls – 1 large, 1 medium
  • Mezzaluna or scissors
  • Fork, butter knife
  • 1 x 23cm non-stick frying pan
  • Wooden spoon
  • Garlic press
  • Tablespoon measure
  • Serving plates
Ingredients:

  • 6 eggs
  • A large handful mushrooms
  • A small handful mixed herbs: chives, parsley and marjoram
  • Flaked salt & black pepper
  • 25g butter
  • Olive oil

 What to do:

  • Trim the mushrooms of any dirt and wipe clean with a damp piece of paper towel. Chop into thin slices and reserve in the large bowl.
  • Wash and carefully dry the herbs, picking off the leaves and discarding the stalks.
  • Using the mezzaluna or scissors, gently & carefully chop the herbs without mashing them.
  • Break the eggs into the medium bowl and whisk lightly with a fork.
  • Add the chopped herbs and season with salt and pepper. Peel the garlic clove and squeeze through the garlic press.
  • Heat half the butter and 2 tablespoons of olive oil in the frying panover medium heat until foaming. Add in the mushrooms and carefully toss a few times to cover in the butter mixture. Sprinkle in a few pinches of salt, a grind of pepper and the garlic, and then sauté until slippery.
  • Wash and dry the large bowl and then scrape out the cooked mushrooms into it.
  • Add the rest of the butter to the pan and then when foaming, pour in the egg mixture and gently rotate the pan to distribute. Cook for 20 seconds or so, until it begins to bubble, then draw the egg into the centre with the wooden spoon and rotate the pan again to redistribute the uncooked egg.
  • The omelette is cooked when the base is set, but is still slightly runny in the middle.
  • Slide the mushrooms onto one half of the omelette, fold the other half over to form a half-moon and slice out on to your serving plate. Serve immediately!

Notes:In what other languages can you say mushrooms? Why do we leave the omelette slightly runny in the middle? Where does the word omelette come from?

ourkitchengarden.net

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Parmesan polenta with sautéed mushrooms and poached egg

Oozy yolk with slippery, garlicky mushrooms and creamy polenta backdrop… hello? Did someone say, ‘Comfort food’?!

ourkitchengarden,net

From the garden: eggs, mushrooms, corn, garlic
Recipe source: Melissa

Equipment:

  • Chopping board & small knife
  • Grater
  • Scales
  • 1 heavy-based saucepan & lid
  • Garlic press
  • Measuring jug
  • 1 small saucepan
  • Salad spinner
  • Paper towel
  • Wooden spoons
  • Bowls – 4 small
  • Medium frying pan
  • Serving bowls
Ingredients:

  • 1 large corn cob
  • 1 garlic clove
  • 100g coarse polenta
  • 50g grana padano
  • Extra-virgin olive oil
  • A knob of butter
  • A large handful mushrooms
  • 4 very fresh large eggs
  • Flaked salt and black pepper

 What to do:

  • Remove jacket and silk from corn, and with a small sharp knife shear the kernels off. Add them to the heavy-based saucepan.
  • Peel and crush the garlic with the garlic press and add half of it to the corn with 500ml water and bring to the boil over a moderate flame, reserving the other half for the mushrooms..
  • Rain in the polenta, stirring. Cover & reduce to a mere simmer 15 mins, stirring every few minutes. Grate the parmesan.
  • When the polenta is ready, remove the lid, beat in the parmesan and season well.
  • Wipe the mushrooms free of dirt, trim any ugly bits and then finely slice.
  • Heat the butter and a splash of olive oil in the frying pan, and when sizzling add the mushrooms with a pinch of salt, the crushed garlic and thyme and cook until the mushrooms are slippery and gorgeous.
  • To poach eggs, fill the medium sized frying pan 5cm deep with water and bring to a simmer. Fill the large bowl with cold water. Carefully crack each egg into a small bowl without breaking it and then carefully slide into the water. Let the pan sit for 4 minutes before removing each egg. (If you’re not ready to serve then you can slide them into the bowl of cold water until needed).
  • To serve, divide polenta among serving bowls. Spoon over some mushrooms, then place an egg on top of each serving. Season generously and serve straight away.

 Notes: What is polenta? What is cooking by ‘absorption’ method? Why shouldn’t we break the eggs when poaching them? How much butter is a knob of butter?

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Poached egg salad with limehairy mayonnaise

What a great name! Limehairy is also known as hoary basil or perennial basil and has a delicious basilly aroma and pretty flowers – and bees love it too! This salad has simple ingredients but they come together so wonderfully, with a spicy kick from the leaves, creaminess from the eggs and vibrant herby notes…

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: iceberg lettuce, eggs, limehairy, landcress, salad burnet, lemon, garlic
Recipe source: Melissa (mayonnaise based on a Delia Smith recipe)
Serves: 4 or 24 tastes

ourkitchengarden.net

Equipment:

  • Medium frying pan
  • Bowls – large, 4 small
  • Draining spoon
  • Salad spinner
  • Paper towel
  • Scales
  • Measures: tablespoon, teaspoon, ½ teaspoon
  • Measuring jug
  • Chopping board and knife, scissors
  • Citrus juicer
  • Stick blender & its cup
  • Serving plates

 

 

 

Ingredients:

  • 4 eggs

For the limehairy mayonnaise:

  • A small handful of limehairy leaves
  • A large handful landcress
  • 1 egg
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1 small clove garlic
  • 1 level teaspoon mustard powder
  • 120ml rice bran oil
  • 25ml olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon white wine vinegar
  • 1 lemon
  • Freshly milled black pepper

To serve:

  • A small head iceberg lettuce
  • A handful salad burnet
ourkitchengarden.net

Salad burnet

What to do:
For the salad:

  • Separate out the iceberg leaves over the sink and rinse under the tap. Fill up a big bowl with cold water & wash the iceberg leaves in several changes of water. Spin dry.
  • Lay out the tea towel and line it with kitchen paper. Spread the salad leaves over the paper and roll the whole lot up like a log. Keep the rolled parcel of leaves in the fridge until needed.
  • Wash and spin dry the burnet and strip off the leaves, discarding the stalks. Wrap them carefully in paper towel and keep them in the fridge with the lettuce.

For the mayonnaise:

  • Wash, spin dry and separate off the landcress leaves and discard the stalks into the compost.  Wash &spin dry the limehairy leaves.
  • Cut the lemon in half and squeeze one half to yield ½ teaspoon lemon juice. Peel the garlic clove.
  • Now break the extra egg into the cup of the stock blender, add the salt, garlic, mustard powder and a few twists of freshly milled black pepper, then blitz to blend these together.
  • Now measure the oils into the jug, mix well with a fork and ask a helper to pour it in a thin trickle into the cup whilst it’s blending. When all the oil is in, add the vinegar, lemon juice, landcress and limehairy leaves, then blend again until the leaves are quite finely chopped.

To poach the eggs:

  • Fill a medium-sized frying pan with water to a depth of approximately 4cm, heat it up to the boil, then lower the heat it to a bare simmer.
  • Then break the 4 eggs into the four separate small bowls taking care not to break the yolks and removing any shell with your fingertips. Then lower them, one at a time, into the simmering water and let them cook together, uncovered, for 4 minutes. Fill a large bowl with cold water.
  • Then, use a draining spoon to lift them from the water and transfer them to the bowl of cold water, until you are ready to use them.

To serve:

  • Bring the lettuce out of the fridge, gently slice up the leaves and arrange the leaves on each plate.
  • Holding a clean tea towel in one hand, scoop up an egg with the slotted spoon and carefully pat dry. Arrange a poached egg in the centre of each salad plate, drizzle some of the mayonnaise over the top of each salad, followed by a sprinkle of the burnet leaves.
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