Monthly Archives: October 2013

Kitchen News – 24th October 2013

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Week 3 already and it’s hot, humid and very smoky… scary to think what the rest of these warm seasons’ weather holds in store? While the mountains burn, the garden here bursts with produce… For a while there I thought that this term would be quieter than the last’s multitude of activities and extravaganzas but I’ve been deluding myself!

We have been welcoming the Year 2 students into the Kitchen Garden program these last weeks, so they’ve been boning up on all the safety issues related to working in a busy kitchen, and also demonstrating knife skills (and Bear Paw: RAAAARRRR!) with flair and precision. Next lesson will include the formal ceremony of Presentation of the Knife Licences…! The children also got a taste of kitchen lessons to come and managed to whip up some snacky antipasto snacks too while they were at it, (clever little cooks that they are already!) so we feasted on Bruschetta with smashed broad beans and garlic; Danish feta with lemon and thyme; Roasted capsicum and garlic cloves with herbs; A simple salad with edible flowers; and rolled out some crispy Rosemary and thyme grissini. Tutto bene!

The biggest news is that we have a new Garden Specialist! Allison has jumped into the role with gusto, and has already started lessons with the children. (Thanks to Emma for all your support this week!) Please drop in to the garden and say hi if you have a moment – and PLEASE consider volunteering for one of our 10 weekly lessons if you have an hour or so to spare! Or even put your hand up for a bit of Stink Bug extermination?!

On the menu this week: the gorgeous-hued Beetroot linguine with landcress, lemon and aromatic herbs; a super-delicious Green lentil and spinach soup; the most fabulous crunchy and spicy Eurasian slaw; and also hand-rolled out some Rosemary and thyme grissini to dip into Yotam’s hummus. Veg-heavy and wonderful – and very little scraps left for the chooks!

For loads of great photos from the week and recipes updated fortnightly, check back here!

Cheers all x

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Eurasian slaw!

As ‘Dude’ food reaches its zenith in Sydney restaurants, we feel we must join the wagon trail rather than beat it… and this is a rather great way to climb on board! The beauty of this dish lies in the freshness of the ingredients – but also in the precision of the slicing – as the finer, the better…

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: red cabbage, cavolo nero, carrots, radishes, celery, coriander
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 6 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Frying pan
  • Jar with lid
  • Measures: jug, ¼ cup, tablespoon, teaspoon, ½ teaspoon
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Colander
  • Graters
  • Salad spinner
  • Bowls – large, med, small
  • Serving bowls

 

Ingredients:

  • 1 small or half a large red cabbage
  • 3 leaves cavolo nero (Tuscan kale)
  • 2 carrots
  • 3 radishes
  • 2 stalks of celery
  • 2 tablespoons sesame seeds
  • A small handful coriander

Spicy Soy Sesame Dressing:

  • 30ml light soy sauce
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar
  • 30ml sesame oil
  • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons rice vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon toasted sesame seeds
  • 1/2 teaspoon chilli flakes
  • Salt and sugar to taste

What to do:

  • Heat the frying pan and gently dry-toast the sesame seeds for a minute or so, making sure they don’t burn. Put a teaspoons-worth into the jar for the dressing and reserve the rest for the garnish.
  • Make the Spicy Soy Sesame Dressing by adding all the dressing ingredients together in a jar. Adjust seasoning as per taste. Shake well with lid on and set aside.
  • Meanwhile separate out all the cabbage leaves and wash well under running water. Shake dry then trimming the stalk into the chook bucket, super-finely slice the leaves into thin shreds.
  • Wash the kale leaves and shake dry. Cut the leaves from the stalks, discarding the stalks into the compost, and slice the leaves into super-fine ribbons.
  • Wash and peel the carrots and grate. Wash and scrub the radishes, cut in half and slice super-thinly. Wash the celery and shake dry. Finely slice into little crescents.
  • Wash and spin the coriander dry. Finely slice the stalks and add to a big bowl. Chop the leaves and reserve for the garnish.
  • Add the rest of the vegetables to the large bowl and mix well. Lightly spoon a generous amount of the dressing over it, stir well, and chill in the fridge until ready to serve.
  • Just before serving add the rest of the dressing to the slaw, and divide into serving bowls, sprinkling on the reserved toasted sesame seeds and the coriander leaves. Eat!

Notes: What does Eurasian mean? What is rice vinegar? What is slaw short for?

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Green lentil and spinach soup

Hugh says, “This makes a substantial soup – add some good bread and it makes a great lunch.” We say, “This is such a tasty soup but for goodness sake please don’t tell the kids how healthy it is!”

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: shallots, carrots, thyme, garlic, tomatoes, parsley, spinach
Recipe source: adapted from a recipe by Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall in Veg Every Day
Serves: 6 at home or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Kettle
  • Measures: jug, tablespoon, teaspoon
  • Scales
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Peeler
  • Bowls – large, med, small
  • A salad spinner
  • Garlic press
  • Mezzaluna
  • Stockpot
  • Serving bowls
Ingredients:

  • 1.5 litres vegetable stock (or 1½ tablespoons bouillon and 1½ litres boiling water)
  • Extra-virgin olive oil
  • 3 shallots (or 1 onion)
  • 1 carrot
  • A few sprigs fresh thyme
  • 3 garlic cloves
  • 3 tomatoes
  • 150g Puy or green lentils
  • 1 small bunch parsley
  • 150g spinach
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper

What to do:

  • Fill the kettle and turn on. When boiled carefully pour into the jug and stir in the bouillon.
  • Peel the shallots or onion and finely dice.
  • Wash and peel the carrot, then finely dice.
  • Wash the thyme and spin it dry. Pick the leaves and reserve in a small bowl.
  • Peel the 3 garlic cloves and squeeze through the press.
  • Wash the tomatoes and dice.
  • Weigh the lentils then pour into the sieve and then rinse under running water.
  • Wash the parsley, spin dry and remove the tough stalks. Finely chop with the mezzaluna.
  • Wash the spinach in several changes of water, shake it dry over the sink, then slice the leaves into ribbons and the stalks into small pieces.
  • In the stockpot, warm 2 tablespoons of the oil over a medium-low heat. Add the shallots, carrot and thyme, and sauté gently for five minutes.
  • Add the garlic and tomatoes, and sauté for a minute more.
  • Tip in the lentils, stir, then add the stock and a little salt and pepper. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat and simmer for 25 minutes until the lentils are tender.
  • Add the parsley and spinach, simmer for another five minutes, season to taste and ladle into bowls. Trickle over a drop of oil and serve!

Notes: How many types of lentil are there? Do you need to soak lentils overnight? What’s a mezzaluna?

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BASC Vacation Care Program 2-6 Wednesday 2nd October

After the simple joys of rolling pasta at the low tables with the wee junior folk, it was fun to get back to the stations and whip up a full menu of springy delights… So we had four groups preparing a different dish each: they prepared the ingredients and cooked the dish, we set the tables and then gobbled up what we had prepared!

And then we all helped to clear up, stack the dishwashers, sweep and tidy… So much fun!

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Our Menu

Salad of baby beets, broad beans and goats’ cheese

Beetroot linguine with land cress, lemon and garden herbs

Pizza with rosemary, olives and rocket

Lavender honey cakes

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Beetroot linguine with land cress, lemon and garden herbs

Our Kitchen Garden students love making pasta – and this recipe sings of spring! It includes the dough mixture as well as instructions on how to use a pasta machine.

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Fresh from the garden: eggs, beetroot, land cress, lemon, marjoram, parsley, coriander
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 8 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Salad spinner
  • Pasta machine
  • Scales, garlic press
  • Scissors
  • Plastic wrap
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Pastry brush, grater
  • Large stock pot
  • Tongs, large & small bowls
  • Serving bowls
Ingredients:

  • 500g typo ‘00’ plain flour
  • 4 free-range eggs
  • 70g pureed beetroot
  • A large handful of land cress (or watercress)
  • A handful of freshly picked herbs
  • 1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • A lemon
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • Flaked salt & black pepper
  • 30g parmesan

What to do:

To make the pasta:

  • Place the large bowl on the scales, reset to zero then measure the flour in to it. Add the beetroot.
  • Crack the eggs carefully into the small bowl, discarding any shell, then add them to the flour. Mix thoroughly with the wooden spoon, then tip the dough onto a clean, dry workbench.
  • Knead the dough for a few minutes, then wrap it in plastic film and let it rest for 1 hour at room temperature.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________

  • Fill the large stockpot and the saucepan with water and set to boil on high with the lids on.
  • Fix the pasta machine to a suitable bench or table – if the surface is not thick enough you may need to place a thick book under the machine. Screw the clamp very tightly.
  • Clear a large space on the workbench alongside the pasta machine. All surfaces must be clean and dry. Press or roll the dough into a rectangle about 8 cm wide.
  • Set the rollers on the pasta machine to the widest setting and pass the dough through. The dough will probably look quite ragged at this stage. Fold it in 3, turn it 90 degrees and roll it through again. Go to the next-thickest setting and pass the dough through 3-4 times.
  • Continue in this manner (changing the settings and passing the dough through) until the dough has passed through the second thinnest setting. Don’t use the very thinnest setting, as the dough gets too fine and is hard to manage. If the dough gets too long to handle comfortably, cut it into 2-3 pieces using the large knife, and roll each piece separately.
  • Lay the pasta strips on a lightly floured surface & dust with a little more flour. Attach the pasta cutter to the machine and pass through the largest rollers, draping it in your hands to catch.
  • Carefully separate each strip and hang over a pole to dry.
  • Clean the pasta machine by brushing it with a dry, wide pastry brush& putting back in its box.  

To finish the dish:

  • Check that the stockpot has been filled with water and is set on high to boil.
  • Wash the land cress in several changes of water and spin dry. Using the scissors, snip the leaves into thin strips and reserve in a big bowl.
  • Wash and dry the lemon and zest it. Cut the lemon in half and squeeze its juice into the big bowl too.
  • Peel the garlic cloves and squeeze them through the garlic press into the bowl too.
  • Wash and spin dry the herbs and strip their leaves, then add them into the rocket bowl.
  • Measure 1/3 cup of olive oil into the bowl and sprinkle on a few pinches of flaked salt and toss to incorporate.
  • Measure the parmesan and grate what you need and keep separate.
  • When the stockpot has started a fast boil, gather your drying pasta on a large baking tray. Add a tablespoon of cooking salt and then the pasta to the pot, stir once and quickly put the lid back on.
  • As soon as the pot begins to boil again, take the lid off. The pasta should only take 1 or 2 minutes to cook from boiling. Taste to check – it’s important that the pasta remains al dente and is not overcooked!
  • Using tongs, carefully pull the pasta (and some of its cooking liquid) out and into the big lemony bowl, sprinkle the parmesan on and toss thoroughly to incorporate.
  • Divide into serving bowls, sprinkle the remaining parmesan on and eat immediately!

Notes: Never wash the pasta machine – it will rust! Just brush down with a strong brush to remove the leftover dough.

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Pizza with rosemary, olives and rocket

We love every kind of pizza, even with more savoury toppings… and we absolutely adore making as much noise as possible throwing the dough!

ourkitchngarden.net

Fresh from the garden: rosemary, rocket, onion, garlic, marjoram, olives
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 8 or 24 tastes 

Equipment:

  • A wooden chopping board & knives
  • A frying pan
  • Bowls – large, med, small
  • Salad spinner
  • Measures – ¼ cup, tablespoons, teaspoons
  • Colander, grater
  • Scales
  • Paper towel
  • Wooden spoon
  • 2 pizza trays
  • Metal spoons
  • Wide egg lifter
  • Pizza cutting wheels
  • Serving plates

 

 

 

 

Ingredients:

Tomato sauce:

  • 1 onion
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • A small handful marjoram
  • A small handful thyme
  • ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 tin diced tomatoes
  • Flaked salt and black pepper

For the pizza topping:

  • A stalk of rosemary
  • A clove of garlic
  • A small bowl or jar of plain olives
  • 1 tub bocconcini
  • Extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 30g parmesan
  • A handful rocket

What to do:

  • Preheat the oven to 220C.

For the tomato sauce:

  • Peel and finely chop the onion and garlic, reserving half of the garlic for the topping.
  • Heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil in the frying pan & gently cook the onion and garlic until translucent but not brown.
  • Open the tin of tomato and add to the frying pan with a pinch of salt and a grind of pepper.
  • Wash, dry and pick the marjoram and thyme. Roughly chop then add to the tomatoes.
  • Simmer gently for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until quite reduced.

For the topping: 

  • Wash the rosemary stalk and wipe dry. Strip the leaves and chop quite small.
  • Pit the olives, press the garlic clove then combine with the rosemary and 2 tablespoons olive oil in a small bowl.
  • Open the tub of bocconcini and cut each ball into 3 or 4 slices.
  • Wash and spin the rocket dry and then reserve in another large bowl.
  • Grate the parmesan and reserve in a small bowl.

Assembling the pizza:

  • Scatter some flour on the workbench, divide the dough into four and roll to form four thin ovals– you will fit two pizzas side-by-side on one oven tray.
  • Flour the trays first and then assemble the ovals onto the trays.
  • Usingthe metal spoons, swirl a couple of spoonfuls of tomato sauce onto the pizza bases, spreading so that they become totally covered with a clean border.
  • Layer the bocconcini on top, spoon on the garlicky olives, then slide the pizza trays into the oven.
  • Wash and dry the wooden chopping boards and set them out ready.

 Baking the pizza:

  • Bake the pizzas for about 12 minutes or until the edges are very crusty and the cheese is bubbling.
  • Use this time to make the dough for the next class if needed.
  • You may want to slip the pizza off the tray onto the rack for the last few minutes, so that you get a really crusty base.
  • Once the pizzasare done, transfer them to the wooden boards using the wide egg lifter.
  • Cut the pizzas in half first, and then each half into squares for each plate.
  • Lift onto serving plates and sprinkle with the rocket and parmesan.
  • Eat!

Notes: Where does pizza come from? What other sort of vegetables could you use in a pizza? What sort of other pizza could we make? What other cheeses could we use?

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Salad of baby beets, broad beans and goats cheese

We love the arrival of broad beans to signify the warm weather! This salad is a firm favourite of ours, with its contrasting flavours and textures.

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Fresh from the garden: broad beans, beetroot, beetroot leaves, lettuce leaves, marjoram, garlic
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 6 at home or 24 tastes 

Equipment:

  • Chopping board & knife
  • 2 x saucepans with lids
  • Colander, scissors
  • Paper towel
  • Measuring: tablespoon, teaspoon
  • Bowls – large, small
  • Garlic press
  • Salad spinner
  • Fork, skewer
  • Plates to serve
Ingredients:

  • 4 baby beetroot
  • A large handful of broad beans
  • A handful of lettuce leaves
  • Small sprig of marjoram
  • 1 garlic clove
  • 2 teaspoons aged balsamic
  • Flaked salt and black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • A small roll of goats’ cheese

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What to do:

  • Cut the leaves from the beetroot, leaving about 2cms of stalk. Reserve any small leaves.
  • Gently scrub the beets under water to remove any dirt and place them in the saucepan with cold water to cover by about 5cm. Heat on high with lid on and boil for 20 minutes until soft when pierced with a skewer.
  • Fill the other saucepan with water and set on high to boil.
  • Pod the broad beans, discarding the outer shell into the compost and add beans to the boiling water. Fill a large bowl with cold water and have ready.
  • Boil the broad beans for 3 minutes, drain and then immediately refresh in the bowl of cold water. Drain again and double-pod by slipping the outer shell off into the compost. Put the beans into a medium bowl.
  • Carefully separate out, then wash the lettuce and beetroot leaves and spin dry. Break up into smaller pieces with your hands if needed, then roll up into a kitchen paper-lined tea towel & place in the fridge until needed.
  • Wash, dry and pick the marjoram leaves and reserve for the garnish.
  • Squeeze the garlic through the garlic press into a large bowl, then mix in the balsamic vinegar and olive oil, season with salt and pepper and stir together gently.
  • Meanwhile when the beetroot are soft, drain the saucepan and fill with cold water to cool the beets. When cool to handle, slide off the skins and root and thinly slice the beetroot. Add the slices to the dressing and toss to soak.
  • To finish, divide the salad leaves among your serving plates and scatter the beetroot slices on top. Scatter the broad beans over the top, then remove the wrapping from the goats’ cheese and dab chunks of cheese over each salad. Drizzle over the remaining dressing, sprinkle with the marjoram and serve.

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BASC Vacation Care Program K-1 Tuesday 1st October

So the little ones worked at the low tables and each of the four groups rolled out linguine, podded broad beans, squeezed lemon juice, prepared herbs and grated parmesan – and then made the pasta for the next class, before clearing and setting the tables and the eating it all up! Deelicious! They also shared a little simple salad too: a perfect holiday lunch!

Beetroot linguine with broad beans, lemon and garden herbs

Our Kitchen Garden students love making pasta – and this recipe sings of spring! It includes the dough mixture as well as instructions on how to use a pasta machine.

oourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: eggs, beetroot, lemon, marjoram, parsley, thyme
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 4 at home or 12 tastes

Equipment:

  • Salad spinner
  • Pasta machine
  • Scales, garlic press
  • Measures – teaspoon
  • Food processor
  • Plastic wrap
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Pastry brush, grater
  • Large stock pot & saucepan
  • Tongs, large & small bowls
  • Serving bowls
Ingredients:

  • 250g typo ‘00’ flour
  • 2 free-range eggs
  • 50g pureed beetroot (see below)
  • A handful of broad beans
  • A handful of freshly picked herbs
  • Extra-virgin olive oil
  • Half a lemon
  • A garlic clove
  • Flaked salt & black pepper
  • 20g parmesan

What to do:

To make the beetroot puree:

  • Scrub a large beetroot under running water, then pop in a saucepan, fill with cold water and then heat to boil for about an hour.
  • Insert a skewer to check if the beet is cooked and soft, then drain, rinse under cold water, and then when cool to handle, slip off the skin with your fingers.
  • Place cooked beetroot in the food processor and blitz until blended to a puree consistency. Freeze the remaining beetroot puree.

To make the pasta:

  • Place the large bowl on the scales, reset to zero then measure the flour in to it. Add the beetroot.
  • Crack the eggs carefully into the small bowl, discarding any shell, then add them to the flour. Mix thoroughly with the wooden spoon, then tip the dough onto a clean, dry workbench.
  • Knead the dough for a few minutes, then wrap it in plastic film and let it rest for 1 hour at room temperature.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________

  • Fill the large stockpot and the saucepan with water and set to boil on high with the lids on.
  • Fix the pasta machine to a suitable bench or table – if the surface is not thick enough you may need to place a thick book under the machine. Screw the clamp very tightly.
  • Clear a large space on the workbench alongside the pasta machine. All surfaces must be clean and dry. Press or roll the dough into a rectangle about 8 cm wide.
  • Set the rollers on the pasta machine to the widest setting and pass the dough through. The dough will probably look quite ragged at this stage. Fold it in 3, turn it 90 degrees and roll it through again. Go to the next-thickest setting and pass the dough through 3-4 times.
  • Continue in this manner (changing the settings and passing the dough through) until the dough has passed through the second thinnest setting. Don’t use the very thinnest setting, as the dough gets too fine and is hard to manage. If the dough gets too long to handle comfortably, cut it into 2-3 pieces using the large knife, and roll each piece separately.
  • Lay the pasta strips on a lightly floured surface & dust with a little more flour. Attach the pasta cutter to the machine and pass through the largest rollers, draping it in your hands to catch.
  • Carefully separate each strip and hang over a pole to dry.
  • Clean the pasta machine by brushing it with a dry, wide pastry brush & putting back in its box.

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To finish the dish:

  • Check that the stockpot & saucepan have been filled with water and are set on high to boil.
  • Pod the broad beans, discarding the outer shell into the compost and add beans to the boiling water. Fill a large bowl with cold water and have ready.
  • Boil the broad beans for 3 minutes, drain and then immediately refresh in the bowl of cold water. Drain again and double-pod by slipping the outer shell off into the compost. Put the beans into the big bowl.
  • Wash and dry the lemon and zest it. Cut the lemon in half and squeeze its juice into the big bowl too.
  • Peel the garlic clove and squeeze it through the garlic press into the bowl too.
  • Wash and spin dry the herbs and strip their leaves, chopping with the mezzaluna, then add them into the garlicky broad bean bowl.
  • Measure 2 tablespoons of olive oil into the bowl and sprinkle on a few pinches of flaked salt and toss to incorporate.
  • Measure the parmesan and grate what you need.
  • When the stockpot has started a fast boil, carefully gather your drying pasta on a large baking tray. Add a tablespoon of cooking salt and then the pasta to the pot, stir once and quickly put the lid back on.
  • As soon as the pot begins to boil again, take the lid off. The pasta should only take 1 or 2 minutes to cook from boiling. Taste to check – it’s important that the pasta remains al dente and is not overcooked!
  • Using tongs, carefully pull the pasta (and some of its cooking liquid) out and into the big lemony bowl, sprinkle half the parmesan on and toss thoroughly to incorporate.
  • Divide into serving bowls, sprinkle the remaining parmesan on and eat immediately!

Notes: Never wash the pasta machine – it will rust! Just brush down with a strong brush to remove the leftover dough.

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Kindergarten visit: Mushroom and garden herb pizza

So the kindergarten came to visit us – after months of peering in the back door of the cottage and asking me if it was my home! And the whole term they had been cultivating some of the 30 boxes of mushrooms given to us by the Australian Mushroom Growers Association just in preparation for their very own pizza… served with a simple salad and loads of smiles… See you in the playground gorgeous kidlets!

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: mushrooms, fresh herbs, onion, garlic
Recipe source: Melissa
Makes: One large pizza

Equipment:

  • Bowls – 1 medium, 2 small
  • Salad spinner
  • Grater
  • 1 large oven tray
  • Wide egg lifter
  • Large wooden board
  • Pizza cutter
  • Tablespoon measure, scales
  • Kitchen towel
  • Tongs
  • Metal spoons
  • Serving plates
Ingredients:

For the pizza topping:

  • A small handful mushrooms
  • ½ tub bocconcini
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • Small handful mixed herb sprigs to yield 1 cup
  • 20g parmesan
  • A small bowl of prepared tomato pizza sauce
  • Flaked salt and black pepper

ourkitchengarden.net What to do:

  • Preheat the oven to 220C. You can prepare the topping now while you wait for the oven to heat up.
  • Wipe the mushrooms and break into small pieces into a big bowl. Drizzle with a tablespoon or two of olive oil and a pinch of salt.
  • Wash and carefully dry the herb sprigs – pick the leaves, discarding the stalks.
  • Tear each ball of bocconcini in half.
  • Grate the parmesan and reserve.

Assembling the pizza:

  • Scatter some flour on the table and roll the dough out to form an even rectangle to cover the baking tray.
  • Assemble the pizza directly onto the tray, flouring the tray well first.
  • Using the metal spoon, swirl a couple of spoonfuls of tomato sauce onto the pizza bases, spreading so that they become totally covered.
  • Layer the bocconcini on top and season well, then scatter the herbs over the pizza.
  • Drizzle the pizza with about a tablespoon of olive oil, then slide it into the oven.

Baking the pizza:

  • Bake the pizza for about 12 minutes or until the edges are very crusty and the cheese is bubbling.
  • You may want to slip the pizza off the tray onto the rack for the last few minutes, so that you get a really crusty base.
  • Once the pizza is done, transfer it to the large wooden board using the wide egg lifter.
  • Cut the pizzas crossways into small squares, and lift onto serving plates.
  • Sprinkle the reserved parmesan cheese over the slices and then get ready to eat!

Notes: What other sort of vegetables could you use in a pizza? What sort of other pizza could we make?

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The Kindergarten visit, Term 3 2013

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Welcome!

The SAKGP Philosophy: Growing, Harvesting, Preparing and Sharing

Our chemical-free food philosophy aided by WHOLEFOODS HOUSE, Woollahra

Life lessons at Bondi

  • SUSTAINABILITY: Helping our planet to continue supporting human life: Composting – Chooks – Reusing – Recycling… Then rubbish!
  • Knife skills and Licences in Year 3

A snapshot of a lesson:

  • The whiteboard & the harvest table

Housekeeping:

  • Allergies & diet restrictions
  • Loos & washing hands!
  • Basic verbal tour
  • Where to go in an emergency
  • Hot water/ bandaids/ washing up liquid
  • Volunteers’ help: in classes, working bees, washing aprons, mopping!

What is expected:

  • Clean hands! Sleeves up!
  • Noise levels: inside voices
  • Walking around the kitchen!
  • Enthusiasm & helping to create our food
  • Sharing jobs & taking turns
  • Cleaning up, setting & clearing, stacking dishwashers

What we’re doing today!

  • Mushroom and garden herb pizza!
  • Each group split into 2: one for rolling out dough & making new dough, one for preparing herbs, toppings and cheeses
  • Scales v. jugs
  • Cleaning tables and washing up, re-setting, dishwasher, sweeping!

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