Posts Tagged With: antipasto

Quick pesto for the roasted pumpkin

This quantity of sauce is perfect for the roasted pumpkin recipe – but don’t stop there! Also wonderful with steaming hot pasta or as part of an antipasto plate with feta or goats’ cheese, roasted capsicum and garlicky bruschetta – or even added to toasted cheese sandwiches!

ourkitchengarden.net

Basil!

Fresh from the garden: basil, garlic
Recipe source: Melissa
Makes: about 1 1/2 cups

Equipment:

  • Scales
  • Bowls – big, medium
  • Salad spinner
  • Grater
  • Small frying pan
  • Food processor
  • Chopping board and small knife
  • Spatula
  • Measuring jug
  • Tablespoon & jar if needed
  • Serving bowls if needed
Ingredients:

  • 1 bunch basil, to yield about 50g
  • 25g parmesan or grana padano
  • 40g pine nuts
  • 1 clove garlic
  • Flaked salt
  • 100ml extra-virgin olive oil plus extra

What to do:

  1. Pick the basil leaves from the stalks and weigh before you wash them!
  2. Then wash the basilin several changes of water, pick off the leaves and thoroughly spin-dry.
  3. Weigh then grate the parmesan.
  4. Heat the frying pan on a medium heat and lightly dry-toast the pine nuts, shaking regularly so that they don’t burn.
  5. Peel the garlic clove, chop it into small pieces and place in the bowl of the food processor with a good pinch of salt. Blend these to a paste and then add the pine nuts and blend again. Stir in the parmesan.
  6. Tear the basil leaves and put them into the mixture. Blending, gradually pour in all the olive oil. Scrape down with the spatula once or twice.
  7. Taste for salt and adjust if necessary.
  8. Serve, or if using later, spoon into a jar, pour in a thin layer of olive oil to cover, add the lid and refrigerate for up to 3 or 4 days.

Notes: Why do we weigh the basil before we wash it? Why do we weigh the parmesan before we grate it?

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Roasted pumpkin with pesto and goats’ cheese

Pumpkin is transformed by a little hot-oven caramelisation and goes especially well with basil and bitey fresh goats cheese… a super-rustic dish perfect for these cooler nights! And instead of shop-bought garam masala (which I love) we used the leftover curry powder from our Curried carrot soup from the last fortnight’s menu. 

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: pumpkin, onions, basil
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 6 as a side order or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  •       Kitchen towel
  •       Chopping board & knife
  •       Baking tray
  •       Bowls – large
  •       Tongs
  •       Spoon
  •       Serving bowls
Ingredients:

  •       1kg pumpkin (Kent, Jap or Butternut)
  •       1 large onion
  •       1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  •       1 teaspoon garam masala
  •       Flaked salt & black pepper
  •       1 quantity quick pesto
  •       100g goats’ cheese

What to do:

  1. Preheat oven to 220°C.
  2. Wash the pumpkin, scrubbing the skin clean, and wipe dry with some paper towel.
  3. If whole, carefully cut in half – you may need to ask an adult to help. Scrape out the seeds and membrane with the spoon and reserve for drying out (or the chooks!).
  4. Cut into cubes about 2cm square: you might find it easier to cut the pumpkin into slices first and then into smaller pieces. Be careful!
  5. Peel the onions and slice in half, then thinly slice.
  6. Drop the pumpkin pieces & onion slices into the large bowl, drizzle with the olive oil, a sprinkle of the garam masala & a good pinch of salt & grind of pepper. Toss to combine with your fingers then spread out onto the baking tray. Wash the bowl.
  7. Bake for 20 minutes until caramelised and tender but with little crispy black tinges.
  8. Meanwhile make the pesto – refer to separate recipe.
  9. Remove pumpkin from oven and using the tongs, place the pumpkin mixture into your serving bowls.
  10. Dribble or dob the pesto over the pumpkin.
  11. Open the packet of goats’ cheese and crumble off small pieces over the pumpkin.
  12. Serve immediately.

Notes: Why do we have to be careful when cutting up the pumpkin? What does caramelised mean? What does garam masala mean?

ourkitchengarden.net

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Antipasto di peperoni tricolore

A wonderful thing happens when you roast capsicum: the crunchy and slightly sour tastes make way for luscious, slippery sweetness & when matched with garlic and herbs the effect is amazing!

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: capsicum, garlic, thyme, marjoram, sage, rosemary
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 6 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Paper towel
  • Plastic wrap
  • Bowls – big, medium
  • Salad spinner
  • Baking tray
  • Oven mitts
  • Large tongs
  • Serving bowls

 

Ingredients:

  • 2 large capsicums
  • Extra-virgin olive oil
  • A head of garlic (10 or 12 cloves)
  • A small handful of thyme sprigs
  • A small handful of marjoram sprigs
  • A small branch of sage
  • A small rosemary stem
  • Flaked salt
  • A 200g slab of Danish feta
  • A cup of pesto

What to do:

  • Preheat oven to 200C.
  • Wash the capsicums and wipe dry.
  • To blacken the capsicums, roast them directly on the gas burner of the stove, turning every minute or so with tongs until the entire surface is blackened. Once charred, set aside to cool in a medium bowl and cover with plastic wrap.
  • Meanwhile separate the garlic cloves but don’t peel them, and put them in the large bowl. Wash and spin-dry the herbs, stripping the herbs from their stalks and putting them in the big bowl.
  • When cool, remove the capsicums from the bowl and peel the charred skin under cool running water with your hands. Cut them in half and remove seeds, drain well and then cut into long thin strips and add them to the bowl.
  • Liberally douse the capsicum strips, garlic and herbs with olive oil and turn to coat.
  • Place strips onto the baking tray with the garlic and herbs scattered over and sprinkle a little flaked salt onto the whole lot and bake for about 15 minutes.
  • Carefully remove the tray from oven with oven mitts and then carefully remove from the oven.
  • To make this an Antipasto Tricolore, unwrap the feta and divide onto serving plates keeping in whole pieces. Pile little mounds of the capsicum, garlic and herbs onto the plates too and then spoon the pesto onto the plates, drizzling some onto the feta cheese. Serve with good bread to mop up!

Notes: What does Tricolore mean? What other vegetables can you use for antipasto? Why do we cover the capsicum in plastic wrap? What does to douse mean?

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Parmesan and dried rosemary biscuits

When I worked at bel mondo a few years ago for the Manfredis we used to serve the parmesan biscuits with little bowls of marinated olives to guests as they sat down at the table – and tried not to eat them while we worked!

ourkitchengarden.net

Parmesan biscuits & olives, simply

Fresh from the garden: rosemary, egg
Recipe source: adapted from a recipe by Steve Manfredi 
Makes: about 30 biscuits

Equipment:

  • Grater
  • Bowls – small
  • Fork
  • Paper towel
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Food processor
  • Scales
  • Cling film & baking paper
  • Baking sheets
  • Serving plates
Ingredients:

  • 80g parmesan
  • 1 egg
  • A few stalks of dried rosemary
  • 125g salted butter at room temperature
  • 250g plain flour
  • Cooking salt

 What to do:

  • Grate the parmesan. Crack the egg into the small bowl and lightly whisk with the fork.
  • Slide the rosemary leaves from the stalks and run them through the food processor. Then add in the salted butter, plain flour, grated parmesan, egg and a pinch of salt.
  • Pulse until they are well incorporated and the dough forms a ball. If the ingredients are too dry add a little water until the dough catches.
  • Remove from the processor, form the dough into a sausage about the diameter of a 50c piece, wrap in cling film and rest in the refrigerator for 20 minutes.
  • Preheat the oven to 180C and line the baking sheets with baking paper.
  • Cut the sausage into coins 3-4mm thick and place on the baking sheets.
  • Cook for 10-12 minutes until golden.

Notes: How is the dried rosemary different to the fresh? Why do we ‘rest’ the dough? What would you serve these biscuits with? What other herbs could you use?

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Quick pesto!

This popular sauce is, of course, perfect for steaming hot pasta – but what about as part of an antipasto plate with feta or goats’ cheese, roasted capsicum and garlicky bruschetta? Or even added to a toasted cheese sandwich mmmmm… And the Quick part? At school we usually work the children’s muscles in pounding the leaves, but here is a no-fuss food processor option for home… I mean, why bark when you have a dog? Woof.

ourkitchengarden.net

Basil!

Fresh from the garden: basil, garlic
Recipe source: Melissa

Equipment:

  • Scales
  • Bowls – big, medium
  • Salad spinner
  • Grater
  • Small frying pan
  • Food processor
  • Chopping board and small knife
  • Spatula
  • Measuring jug
  • Tablespoon & jar if needed
  • Serving bowls if needed
Ingredients:

  • 1 big bunch basil, to yield about 100g
  • 50g parmesan or grana padano
  • 80g pine nuts
  • 1 large clove garlic
  • Flaked salt
  • 200ml extra-virgin olive oil plus extra

What to do:

  • Wash and carefully dry the basil, picking off the leaves and discarding the stalks. Weigh to make sure you have the correct amount and then wash in cold water in a big bowl and spin dry thoroughly.
  • Weigh then grate the parmesan.
  • Heat the frying pan on a medium heat and lightly dry-toast the pine nuts, shaking regularly so that they don’t burn.
  • Peel the garlic clove, chop it into small pieces and place in the bowl of the food processor with a good pinch of salt. Blend these to a paste and then add the pine nuts and blend again. Stir in the parmesan.
  • Tear the basil leaves and put them into the mixture. Blending, gradually pour in all the olive oil. Scrape down with the spatula once or twice.
  • Taste for salt and adjust if necessary.
  • Serve, or if using later, spoon into a jar, pour in a thin layer of olive oil to cover, add the lid and refrigerate for up to 3 or 4 days.

Notes: With what else can you use pesto? What also goes with well with basil? Why do we toast the pine nuts? What could you use instead of pine nuts?

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Broad bean puree

Alice says, ‘As the season progresses, the beans continue to mature, and they become larger and starchier. At this point they can be popped out of their pods, skinned and cooked into a luscious, bright green puree that I adore slathering on crisp croutons or serving alongside roasted meats.’

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: broad beans, garlic, rosemary
Recipe source: Alice Waters, The Art of Simple Food
Serves: 8 or 28 tastes

Equipment:

  • Medium heavy-bottomed saucepan
  • Colander
  • Scales
  • Bowls – 3 big, medium
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Measures – jug
  • Paper towel
  • Food mill
  • Spoon
  • Serving bowls
Ingredients:

  • 1.8kg broad beans in shell
  • 100ml olive oil
  • 4 garlic cloves
  • 1 branch rosemary
  • Flaked salt
  • 100ml water
  • 50ml extra-virgin olive oil

 What to do:

  • Bring a pot of water to the boil as you shell the broad beans.
  • Blanch quickly in the boiling water and then drain & cool in a bowl of cold water for a minute. Drain and pop the beans out of their skins. Wipe the saucepan clean.
  • Peel and slice the garlic cloves. Wash and wipe dry the rosemary.
  • Heat 100ml olive oil in the dry saucepan, then add the broad beans, garlic, the branch of rosemary, a pinch of salt and 100ml water, and cook until the beans are very tender, stirring occasionally, and adding more water if necessary.
  • The beans are done when they can be crushed easily with the back of a spoon, about 15 minutes. Mash with a spoon or pass them through a food mill.
  • Stir in the 50ml extra-virgin olive oil. Taste and season with salt as needed.
  • Serve right away or at room temperature.

Notes: What is another name for broad beans? What would be good to serve with the puree?

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Kitchen News – June 20th 2012

Today was the most beautiful day and we had the kindie kids playing sports in the grassy playground beside the cottage all afternoon – it was lovely to hear all their voices and to see them hula-hooping away in the sunshine! And good it is too that the grass has hardened up a bit after the deluges we’ve had recently … I picked some beautiful bright yellow wattle for the vases on our stripy tables, and its presence reminds me that we are in the deep midwinter, with solstice – and shortest daylight – upon us… lucky we are indeed to live with such beautiful days!

Getting down to business – this week’s menu theme is tapas/ antipasto/ mezze, with some great class discussion on foods from other countries that we now call our own… we’ve whizzed some delicious hummus from chickpeas we soaked overnight and then simmered (yes, more pulses this week, I just can’t get enough of them!) eaten with our own rosemary and thyme grissini; some fabulous mozzarella and thyme arancini; the most moist and gooey tortilla de patata that my stepmother Carmen would be proud of; and some power-packed and spicy champiñones al ajillo (garlicky mushrooms) served with a simple Spanish-style dressed leaf salad… poor chooks though: nothing left for them! The girls in 4W today ate it ALL UP! Luckily our feathered girls got the mushy veggies left over from making stock or they would be turning against me in hunger & disgust! Next week we’ll also try our hand at pickling some of our wonderful cauliflower, broccoli and carrots for a juicy giardiniera…

To all our readers: please think of volunteering if you have a little time next term! Some of our trusty helpers have had to say goodbye & we will be looking to fill lots of spots… we need you! Thank you!

PS All these recipes are up (or about to be!) – please post a comment here if you want one from the past few months & don’t see it, as I’ll try and get the popular recipes up asap.

And don’t forget our kitchen garden SCHOOL HOLIDAY PROGRAM! Book now, spaces are filling fast!

Cheers! Melissa

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