Posts Tagged With: chickpeas

Warm salad of Nolans Road chickpeas, kale and Greek yoghurt

We love our Nolans Road organic Kabuli chickpeas – they’re so fresh they only need about half the cooking time of normal chickpeas – and so worthwhile doing from scratch! Dee Nolan suggests soaking and cooking heaps more than you need, then freezing the rest for another time as they’re easily resurrected!

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: kale, carrots, garlic, mint, coriander, lemon
Recipe source: inspired by the recipes of Yotam Ottolenghi

Equipment:

  • Bowls – glass, large, small
  • Saucepans – med, large & heavy
  • Sieve & colander
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Salad spinner
  • Peeler
  • Garlic press
  • Measures – ½ cup, 1/3 cup, tablespoon, teaspoon
  • Scales
  • Mezzaluna
  • Citrus juicer
  • Serving bowls
Ingredients:

  • 200g dried chickpeas
  • 1 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
  • A large handful kale leaves
  • 1/3 cup olive oil, plus extra to finish
  • 3 medium carrots
  • 1 teaspoon caraway seeds
  • 1 garlic clove
  • A small handful mint
  • A small handful coriander
  • 1 lemon
  • Cooking salt, flaked salt and black pepper
  • 1/2 cup Greek yogurt

What to do:

  • Soak the chickpeas overnight in plenty of cold water with a teaspoon of bicarb.*
  • Next day, drain, rinse and simmer them in a big saucepan or about 25 minutes in fresh ­water until tender, then drain.
  • Meanwhile, half-fill the smaller saucepan with water and a teaspoon of salt and set it to boil.
  • Strip the kale leaves from the stalks, discarding the stalks. Roll the leaves up and cut into fine ribbons, then blanch them in the boiling water for 5 minutes. Drain then refresh under cold running water and squeeze dry.
  • Meanwhile peel then chop the carrots into small dice.
  • Wash and spin the mint (picking the mint leaves) and coriander, then finely chop.
  • Cut the lemon in two and squeeze one half. Peel then crush the garlic clove.
  • Heat up the olive oil in a large saucepan. Add the carrots and caraway seeds and sauté for 5 minutes on medium heat. Add the kale, the drained chickpeas and continue cooking for another 5 minutes.
  • Now add the garlic, herbs, a tablespoon of lemon juice and a sprinkle of salt and pepper. Remove from the heat and leave to cool for a few minutes. Taste and adjust the seasoning.
  • To serve, mix together the yogurt with a tablespoon of olive oil and another sprinkle of flaked salt and pepper. Pile the vegetables on serving dishes and spoon the yogurt on top. Sprinkle with freshly ground pepper and serve.

 Notes: Why do we soak the chickpeas overnight? What are other names for chickpeas?

*If you forget to soak the chickpeas the night before (as I have done in the cottage on more than one occasion (!) then boil the chickpeas for an hour and then leave them to soak in that same liquid for another hour. Drain, rinse, and then cook as above…

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Dee Nolan’s kabuli chickpeas, leek and green veggie soup

Late last year I bumped in to Dee Nolan at Sean’s and we soon got chatting about her amazing olive oils (Sean’s pours the Nolan’s Road Extra Virgin Delicate with the malt scrolls and cracked wheat log) and her organic, South Australian kabuli chickpeas – as well as the great deeds done in the SAKGP schools… Soon after I was the beneficiary at school of a wonderful gift from Nolan’s Road: a huge box of Dee’s chickpeas! Regular readers of this site will know how much I love to blend up these quick-cooking* chickpeas for Yotam’s hummus, but I’ve also been waiting for an excuse to simmer up some seasonal soup…

Rugged up against a cold, windy and rainy autumn day? Perfect!

ourkitchengarden.net

Nolan’s Road delivery!

Fresh from the garden: potato, leeks, garlic, bok choy, cabbage, kale, spinach, silverbeet
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: about 6 or 30 tastes

Equipment:

  • Scales
  • 2 large saucepans with lid
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Peeler
  • Grater
  • Kettle
  • Colander
  • Bowls – big, med
  • Mandoline
  • Stick blender
  • Measures – lt jug, tablespoon
  • Wooden spoon, ladle
  • Serving bowls
Ingredients:

  • 250g dried chickpeas, soaked overnight
  • 1 large potato
  • 2 large leeks
  • A bunch of leafy green veg: bok choy, cabbage, kale, spinach, silverbeet
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 knob of butter
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • Flaked salt and freshly-ground black pepper
  • 1 litre boiling water with 1 rounded tablespoon bouillon or 1 litre stock
  • 50g parmesan

What to do:

  • Rinse soaked chickpeas, cover with water, bring to the boil and simmer for 10 minutes.
  • Meanwhile, slice off tough bits of leek skin.  Slit from top to bottom and rinse thoroughly under running water to get rid of any mud trapped between layers of the vegetable.  Slice finely.
  • Peel the potato under running water and then slice finely using the mandoline.
  • Peel and finely slice the garlic. Grate the parmesan.
  • Warm a thick-bottomed pan, and add the tablespoon of oil and the knob of butter. Add the leeks and garlic to the pan and sweat gently with a good pinch of salt until tender and sweet – 5 minutes at least. Add the sliced potato and turn in the buttery mixture.
  • Drain the chickpeas and then add to the leeks and sliced potato and cook for 1 minute. Add about two-thirds of the stock and simmer for 15 minutes.
  • Meanwhile wash the leafy veg thoroughly, shake dry and chop into bite-sized pieces.
  • With about 5 minutes to go, add any veggie stalks in to the soup, and then after a minute or two add in the leaves, stirring to combine & wilt.
  • Pour half the soup out into the 2nd pot and puree with the stick blender. Leave the other half whole, and then pour back in together – pureeing half gives a lovely smooth comforting feel but also keeps a bit of texture. Now add enough of the remaining stock to achieve the consistency you like.
  • Check for seasoning, ladle into bowls to serve and add a sprinkle of parmesan to finish.

 Notes: Why do we soak the chickpeas overnight? What’s the number one rule with the mandoline? What is sweating the leeks?

ourkitchengarden.net

Nolan’s Road kabuli chickpea, leek & green veggie soup

*If you’re researching recipes from European or US books or websites you may read that the chickpeas, once you’ve soaked them overnight, will need an hour or more of  boiling. I find that the Nolan’s Road chickpeas take less than half that time so start checking after about 20 minutes!

And PS. If you can be organised enough to soak your chickpeas in advance, DO IT!!! Whilst I also keep tins of chickpeas, borlotti beans, cannellini et al in my pantry, there is simply nothing better than long-soaked and freshly cooked ones, plus you avoid the nasty BPA-lined tins. Hooray!

 

 

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Simon Rimmer’s carrot and coriander falafel

Simon Rimmer is a British chef with a reputation for heading wonderful vegetarian restaurants in England whilst not actually being vegetarian himself. He has written four cookbooks.

Fresh from the garden: carrot, chilli, coriander, parsley, mint

Equipment:

  • Frying pan
  • Mortar & pestle
  • Peelers, sieve
  • Kitchen paper
  • Salad spinner
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Lemon juicer
  • Garlic press
  • Food processor
  • Spatula
  • Grater
  • Plate
  • Slotted spoon & metal spoon
  • Measures – tablespoon, teaspoon, ½ teaspoon
  • Serving plates
Ingredients:

For the falafels

  • 1 teaspoon cumin seeds
  • 1 teaspoon coriander seeds
  • 2 x 400g cans chickpeas
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1½ teaspoons baking powder
  • 2 tablespoons plain flour
  • 100g carrot
  • 1 red chilli (optional)
  • 1 garlic clove
  • A small handful fresh coriander
  • A small handful fresh parsley
  • 1 lemon
  • vegetable oil, for frying
  • sesame seeds, to garnish

For the yoghurt dip

  • 100ml Greek yoghurt
  • A small handful fresh coriander
  • A small handful fresh mint
  • 1 lime
  • 1 tablespoon tahini

What to do:

  • For the falafels, toast the cumin and coriander seeds in the dry frying pan for 1-2 minutes, or until fragrant. Grind the seeds in the pestle and mortar.
  • Peel and finely grate the carrot & squeeze the moisture out a piece of kitchen paper. Wash, spin-dry the coriander, parsley and mint and finely chop to yield 2 tablespoons of each. Reserve some of the coriander and all of the mint for the yoghurt dip. Zest the lemon and peel and crush the garlic clove. Juice the lime. Drain the chickpeas into the sieve & rinse.
  • Blend the toasted spices together with the rest of the falafel ingredients in the food processor until well combined.
  • Shape spoonfuls of the falafel mixture into balls and set aside on a plate.
  • Meanwhile, heat 1cm vegetable oil in the frying pan and fry the falafels for 1-2 minutes on each side. Remove the falafel from the pan with a slotted spoon and set aside to drain on kitchen paper. Sprinkle with the sesame seeds.
  • For the yoghurt dip, combine the Greek yoghurt, coriander, mint, lime and tahini in the jug of the stick blender and whizz until smooth.
  • Serve the falafels with the yoghurt dressing and toasted pita breads if you have them!
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Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall’s chickpea, potato and kale curry

Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall is a British chef, famous for the TV show ‘River Cottage’ and his support of real food, local and seasonal foods, and humanely produced livestock .

Fresh from the garden: potatoes, kale, onion, coriander

Equipment:

  • Bowls – glass, large
  • Saucepans – med, large
  • Sieve & colander
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Microplane zester
  • Salad spinner
  • Peeler
  • Measures – jug, tablespoon, teaspoon, ½ teaspoon
  • Scales
  • Frying pan
  • Mortar & pestle
  • Wooden spoon
  • Serving bowls
Ingredients:

  • 300g dried chickpeas (or 2 tins, drained and rinsed)
  • 1 teaspoon cumin seeds, plus a little extra to garnish
  • 1 teaspoon coriander seeds
  • ½ teaspoon mustard seeds
  • 1 hot, dried red chilli, crumbled
  • 1 teaspoon ground turmeric
  • 2.5cm piece fresh ginger
  • 1 tablespoon rice bran oil
  • 1 large onion
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 700ml chicken or vegetable stock
  • 250g potatoes
  • 150g kale (or cabbage)
  • Greek yogurt, to serve
  • A small handful coriander leaves

What to do:

  • Soak the chickpeas overnight in plenty of cold water.
  • Next day, drain, rinse and simmer them for about 30 minutes in fresh ­water until tender, then drain. (If using tinned, just drain and rinse.)
  • Peel and grate the ginger with the microplane zester. Peel, halve and finely slice the onion. Peel and finely chop the garlic. Peel and chop the potato into 3cm dice.
  • Wash and shake the kale leaves dry. Strip the leaves from the stem (discarding the stem) and finely shred the leaves. Wash and spin-dry the coriander and finely chop.
  • Put the frying pan over a medium heat and, when hot, dry-toast the cumin, coriander seeds and mustard seeds and the chilli for a couple of minutes ­until they smell ­really fragrant and the mustard starts to pop. Grind to a powder with the pestle and mortar, and mix in the turmeric and ginger.
  • Heat the oil in a large saucepan over a medium heat, and fry the onion, stirring regularly, until soft and golden brown. Stir in the garlic and spices, leave to cook for a minute or two, and add the stock. Simmer for five minutes, then add the chickpeas and potatoes. Cook until the spuds are tender, then add the kale. Cook for a few minutes, until the greens are tender, then serve with a dollop of thick yogurt on top, along with a ­sprinkling of toasted cumin seeds and some coriander leaves.

Notes: Why do we dry-toast the spices? What does to shred the leaves mean?

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Kitchen News – June 20th 2012

Today was the most beautiful day and we had the kindie kids playing sports in the grassy playground beside the cottage all afternoon – it was lovely to hear all their voices and to see them hula-hooping away in the sunshine! And good it is too that the grass has hardened up a bit after the deluges we’ve had recently … I picked some beautiful bright yellow wattle for the vases on our stripy tables, and its presence reminds me that we are in the deep midwinter, with solstice – and shortest daylight – upon us… lucky we are indeed to live with such beautiful days!

Getting down to business – this week’s menu theme is tapas/ antipasto/ mezze, with some great class discussion on foods from other countries that we now call our own… we’ve whizzed some delicious hummus from chickpeas we soaked overnight and then simmered (yes, more pulses this week, I just can’t get enough of them!) eaten with our own rosemary and thyme grissini; some fabulous mozzarella and thyme arancini; the most moist and gooey tortilla de patata that my stepmother Carmen would be proud of; and some power-packed and spicy champiñones al ajillo (garlicky mushrooms) served with a simple Spanish-style dressed leaf salad… poor chooks though: nothing left for them! The girls in 4W today ate it ALL UP! Luckily our feathered girls got the mushy veggies left over from making stock or they would be turning against me in hunger & disgust! Next week we’ll also try our hand at pickling some of our wonderful cauliflower, broccoli and carrots for a juicy giardiniera…

To all our readers: please think of volunteering if you have a little time next term! Some of our trusty helpers have had to say goodbye & we will be looking to fill lots of spots… we need you! Thank you!

PS All these recipes are up (or about to be!) – please post a comment here if you want one from the past few months & don’t see it, as I’ll try and get the popular recipes up asap.

And don’t forget our kitchen garden SCHOOL HOLIDAY PROGRAM! Book now, spaces are filling fast!

Cheers! Melissa

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Hearty cabbage & chickpea soup

Winter = soup! This is lovely hearty way to get stuck into some cold weather… I used some Nolans Road organic kabuli chickpeas (from Wholefoods House, Woollahra) that were fantastic & only needed about 20 minutes cooking after soaking all night… and also ate it with some toasted day old Iggy’s country round sourdough (just seen) of course!

Our Kitchen Garden soup

Equipment:

  • Bowls – glass, large, med
  • Garlic press
  • Chopping board
  • Stockpot
  • Medium saucepan
  • Colander, sieve
  • Measures – tablespoon, jug
  • Wooden spoon, ladle
  • Serving bowls

 

Ingredients:

  • 150g dried chickpeas
  • 1 tablespoon bicarbonate of soda
  • A small branch of sage
  • 6 cloves garlic
  • 2 leeks
  • 1 onion
  • 1 head cabbage
  • A small handful parsley
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • Flaked salt & black pepper
  • 2 litres vegetable stock
  • 1 tin chopped tomatoes

What to do:

  • The night before, place your dried chickpeas in the glass bowl and fill the bowl with cold water to double the height of the chickpeas, add the bicarb and stir. They will need to soak for at least 12 hours.
  • At the start of the lesson:
  • Drain the chickpeas into the colander and rinse them well, then put them into the medium saucepan with about 3cm cold water to cover.
  • Rinse the sage, keeping the branch whole, and shake dry. Peel 3 of the garlic cloves and add them, whole, to the saucepan. Also add the branch of sage, a teaspoon of salt & grind of pepper. Set on a medium heat and simmer for 2o minutes.
  • Meanwhile wash the leeks, scoring and peeling the outer layers off to look for hidden dirt, and then finely chop the leeks into thin slices.
  • Chop the cabbage in half and wash, checking for slugs or dirt to clean! Chop finely, cutting the core into small slivers.
  • Peel and chop the onion into small dice. Squeeze the remaining 3 cloves of garlic through the press. Wash the parsley and spin dry. Finely chop.
  • In the large stockpot, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Stir in the onion, leeks and garlic and cook GENTLY until onion is transparent, about 5 minutes.
  • Stir in stock or water, with a teaspoon of salt and grind of pepper. Bring to the boil, then stir in bouillon powder if using, and the cabbage. Simmer until cabbage wilts, about 10 minutes.
  • Chickpeas: After 20 minutes set the sieve over a heatproof bowl and carefully pour the chickpeas and their liquid in to drain, then scoop the chickpeas out into the cabbage soup with a cup of the cooking liquid.
  • Stir in the tomatoes and return to the boil, then simmer for about 20 minutes stirring often.
  • Check for seasoning and add in the chopped parsley. Ladle into serving bowls.
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Kitchen News – June 7th 2012

Well that’s definitely it for summer then! With crazy winds and notice to tidy up gutters and garden toys we’ve well and truly launched into the coldest season…

And that’s fabulous news in the kitchen!

A hit this week is our Hearty Cabbage & Chickpea soup, with veggies left chunky and our knife skills put to the test… also using up our bumper crop of cabbage: the crunchy, slippery goodness of iceberg Sang choi bao with stir-fried cabbage & crispy kale. Fingerlicking good… passed the dripping-soy-sauce-down-the-arm test! We’ve also been experimenting with a gluten and lactose-free version of Schiacciata con l’uva e olio d’oliva, and I can confidently say that it was gobbled up by everybody! And last but not least, our ever-morphing Our winter salad with poached eggs & baby beets – simple and delicious!

Placing the grapes just so...

And click on these links for recipes from the last few weeks: Gnocchi with burnt butter & sage and Broccoli and garden herb pizza. If you need any other recipes and don’t see them on this site, drop me a line here & I’ll put them up for you!

What you lookin' at?

Happy souping everybody!

And don’t forget, spaces are filling fast for Our Kitchen Garden School Holiday Program… Head on over to the page & check it out!

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