Posts Tagged With: Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall

Hugh’s Magic Dough

Bondi kids love making dough: bread, pizza and pasta regularly grace our table! This ‘magic’ dough recipe can form the base for pizza, flatbreads, breadsticks etc…

Recipe source: Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, Veg Every Day
Makes: 2 large pizza or 2 calzone

Equipment:

  • Scales
  • Stand mixer& dough hook
  • Measures – tablespoon, teaspoon, ½ teaspoon
  • Bowls – large, medium
  • Cling film
Ingredients:

For the magic dough:

  • 250g plain white flour
  • 250g strong white flour
  • 1½ level teaspoons fine sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon instant dried yeast
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil, plus a little extra for oiling

What to do:

For the magic dough:

  • Put the two flours into the bowl of the stand mixer with the salt and yeast. Mix well using the dough hook. Add the oil and 325ml warm water and mix to a rough dough. Knead for 5–10 minutes, until smooth. This is quite a loose and sticky dough, which is just as it should be – you get better-textured bread this way – so try not to add too much flour if you can help it, it will become less sticky as you knead.
  • Trickle a little oil into a clean bowl, add the kneaded dough and turn it in the oil so it is covered with a light film. Cover with a tea towel or cling film and leave in a warm place to rise until doubled in size – at least an hour, probably closer to two – or if using the next day, wrap bowl in cling film and put straight into the fridge to prove slowly.
  • When the dough is well risen and puffy, tip it out and ‘knock it back’ by poking it with your outstretched fingers until it collapses to its former size. It’s now ready to be shaped to your will.

Notes: Why do we leave the dough to rise? What is this process called?

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Silverbeet, spring onion and ricotta calzone

These folded pizzas are great with a homemade Napoli sauce served alongside (or even added to the filling before baking) – and you can even add prosciutto, ham or roast chicken at home. Mandatory is a leafy salad!

ourkitchengarden.net

Recipe sourceMelissa
Fresh from the garden: silverbeet or spinach, spring onion, lemon, garlic
Makes: 4 large calzone

Equipment:

  • Rolling pins
  • 2 large baking sheets
  • Chopping board & knife, scissors
  • Large frying pan
  • Garlic press, wooden spoon, tongs
  • Large bowl
  • Grater, microplane grater
  • Baking paper
  • Scales
  • Measuring cup
  • Pastry brush
  • Serving plates
Ingredients:

  • 2 recipes Hugh’s Magic Dough
  • Plain flour, for rolling out dough
  • 1kg spinach or silverbeet
  • 4 or 5 spring onions
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 3 cups ricotta
  • 1 tub bocconcini
  • 50g parmesan
  • 1 lemon
  • Flaked salt & black pepper
  • Coarse polenta for dusting baking sheet
  • Extra-virgin olive oil

What to do:

  • Preheat oven to 230C.
  • Lightly dust the work surface and rolling pin with flour. Divide the dough into 4 and press and roll it out into 4 x large rectangles. Dust the baking sheets with a sprinkle of polenta and drape 2 dough rectangles over each tray, leaving half off adjacent edges to fold back over later.
  • Wash the spinach or silverbeet, shake dry and slice or cut the leaves from the stalks (leaving the stalks for the chooks), then slice the leaves into thin strips. Squeeze the garlic through the press. Wash the spring onions and strip the tough outer leaf away. Chop into 1cm pieces.
  • Heat the frying pan with 2 tablespoons of olive oil and add the garlic and spring onion, gently cooking for 30 seconds. Then add the strips of spinach & a pinch of salt to wilt. Cook, tossing for 3 or 4 minutes until cooked through. Squeeze any moisture out with the back of the wooden spoon and place spinach in the large bowl.
  • Drain the bocconcini & pull each ball apart into little pieces, add to the spinach with the ricotta and season with salt and pepper.Grate the parmesan and add to the spinach, and using the microplane grater, zest the lemon into the mixture.
  • Place the filling on the tray half of each oval leaving a 2cm border along the edge.
  • Fold the remaining dough over the filling until the edges line up and pinch the edges together to seal. Gently roll the pinched edges under to form a rim and brush the tops with olive oil.
  • Bake for 15/20 minutes until golden brown and the centre is hot and melted, rotating midway through cooking.

 ourkitchengarden.net

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River Cottage garlicky flatbreads

Bondi kids love making dough: bread, pizza and pasta regularly grace our table! And we also love, love, love garlicky anything! This dish is great for mopping up any dip, sauce or soup, but especially good for the broad bean puree…

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: garlic
Recipe source: Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, Veg Every Day
Serves: 8 or 30 tastes

Equipment:

  • Measures – jug,tablespoon, teaspoon, ½ teaspoon
  • Stand mixer
  • Scales
  • Bowls – large, medium
  • Heavy non-stick frying pan
  • Rolling pins
  • Tongs
  • Tea towels
  • Plate & paper towel
  • Serving plates
Ingredients:For the magic dough:

  • 250g plain white flour
  • 250g strong white flour
  • 1½ level teaspoons fine sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon instant dried yeast
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil, plus a little extra for oiling

For the garlic oil:

  • About 120ml olive oil
  • 1 fat garlic clove

What to do:

For the magic dough:

  • Put the two flours into the bowl of the stand mixer with the salt and yeast. Mix well using the dough hook. Add the oil and 325ml warm water and mix to a rough dough. Knead for 5–10 minutes, until smooth. This is quite a loose and sticky dough, which is just as it should be – you get better-textured bread this way – so try not to add too much flour if you can help it, it will become less sticky as you knead.
  • Trickle a little oil into a clean bowl, add the kneaded dough and turn it in the oil so it is covered with a light film. Cover with a tea towel and leave in a warm place to rise until doubled in size – at least an hour, probably closer to two.
  • When the dough is well risen and puffy, tip it out and ‘knock it back’ by poking it with your outstretched fingers until it collapses to its former size. It’s now ready to be shaped to your will.

For the garlic oil:

  • Peel the garlic clove and very finely chop it. Combine the olive oil and garlic in a frying pan and place over a medium heat. You’re not going to fry it, just warm it through to take the edge off the garlic. So as soon as you see the first signs of a sizzle, pour the oil and garlic out of the pan into a small bowl to infuse. Wipe the frying pan clean.

For the flatbreads:

  • After ‘knocking back’ the risen dough, take lemon-sized balls and roll them into 8 flat circles, 2mm thick. Leave to rest for 5 minutes.
  • Meanwhile heat a heavy-based, non-stick frying pan over high heat until smoking hot.
  • Carefully lay one flatbread in the pan and cook for about 2 minutes, until bubbly on top and patched with brown spots on the base. Flip over and cook for 1-2 minutes more. Remove immediately to a plate and trickle with some of the garlicky oil. Scatter with a little flaked salt too. Repeat with all the dough. Cut the oiled flatbreads into wedges to serve.

Notes: Why do we leave the dough to rise? What is this process called?

ourkitchengarden.net

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Fish-free salad Nicoise

Hugh says, ‘Without any tuna or anchovies, I guess you might upset the good people of Nice a bit with this one, but it is an exceptionally delicious and substantial salad – with plenty going on.’

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: new potatoes, green beans, eggs, small lettuce leaves, olives, basil, garlic
Recipe source: Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, Veg Every Day
Serves: 4 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Scales
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Saucepans – med, small
  • Colander
  • Small jar & lid
  • Measures: tablespoon, teaspoon
  • Salad spinner
  • Serving plates
Ingredients:

  • 500g new (baby) potatoes
  • 200g green beans
  • 8 large eggs at room temperature
  • A small handful baby lettuce leaves
  • A handful small black olives
  • About 12 basil leaves
  • Flaked salt and black pepper

For the dressing:

  • ½ small garlic clove
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon cider vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • A pinch of sugar

 What to do:

  • Wash the beans and potatoes – do not peel them! Tail the beans & chop into 3cm lengths.
  • You can cook small new potatoes whole, but cut any larger ones in half or smaller, so they’re all roughly the same size. Cover with cold water in the medium saucepan, add salt and bring to the boil. Reduce the heat and simmer for 8-12 minutes until tender, adding the beans for the last 4 minutes. Drain, tip into a bowl and leave to cool.
  • To cook the eggs, bring a small saucepan of water to the boil. Add the eggs, return to a simmer, then cook for 7 minutes. Lightly crack the shells and run the eggs under cold water for a minute or two to stop the cooking, then leave to cool. Peel and quarter the eggs.
  • To make the dressing, put all the ingredients into a screw-topped jar, seasoning with salt and pepper, and shake until emulsified.
  • Halve, quarter or thickly slice the cooked potatoes. Put them back with the beans, add some of the dressing and toss gently together.
  • Wash the lettuce & basil leaves in several changes of water. Spin-dry and then gently toss in a bowl with a little of the dressing.
  • Arrange the lettuce, potatoes, and beans on your serving plates and distribute the olives and eggs over the salad. Scatter with torn basil leaves, trickle over the remainingdressing and grind over some pepper. Serve straight away.

Notes: What does emulsified mean? What does the adjective Niçoise mean?

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Rocket, fennel and lentil salad

I love every recipe from this book, there’s so much inspiration! I love it almost as much as our book!

ourkitchengarden.net

From the garden: rocket, fennel, parsley, onion, lemon
Recipe source: Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall in Veg Every Day
Serves: 4 at home or 20 tastes

Equipment:

  • 1 small saucepan & lid
  • Colander or sieve
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Citrus juicer
  • Jar with lid
  • Bowls – large, med, small
  • Measures – jug, teaspoon
  • Salad spinner
  • Serving bowls
Ingredients:

  • 125g little green lentils
  • 1 bay leaf
  • ½ small onion
  • A few parsley stalks
  • A large fennel bulb
  • About 75g rocket

For the dressing

  • 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
  • A lemon
  • 120ml olive oil
  • A pinch of sugar
  • Flaked salt & black pepper

 

 What to do:

  • Put the lentils in the saucepan and add plenty of water. Bring to the boil and simmer for a minute only, then drain. Return the lentils to the pan and pour on just enough water to cover them. Add the bay leaf, onion and parsley stalks. Bring back to a very gentle simmer, and cook slowly for about half an hour, until tender but not mushy.
  • Meanwhile, to make the dressing: zest the lemon and then cut in half and juice. Add these and the rest of the dressing ingredients to the jar, put the lid on and shake until emulsified.
  • When the lentils are done, drain them well and discard the herbs and onion. While still warm, combine with a good half of the dressing. Leave until cooled, then taste and adjust the seasoning; you could add a little more salt, sugar, pepper or lemon juice if needed.
  • Trim the fennel, removing the tough outer layer (unless they are young and very fresh). Halve the bulb vertically, then slice as thinly as you can, tip to base.
  • Wash and spin dry the rocket, then pile about two-thirds of the lentils into wide serving bowls. Scatter over the rocket and fennel and trickle over the rest of the dressing. Scatter over the remaining lentils and serve.

Notes:What does emulsified mean? What other sort of lentils are there? What does fennel smell like?

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Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall’s chickpea, potato and kale curry

Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall is a British chef, famous for the TV show ‘River Cottage’ and his support of real food, local and seasonal foods, and humanely produced livestock .

Fresh from the garden: potatoes, kale, onion, coriander

Equipment:

  • Bowls – glass, large
  • Saucepans – med, large
  • Sieve & colander
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Microplane zester
  • Salad spinner
  • Peeler
  • Measures – jug, tablespoon, teaspoon, ½ teaspoon
  • Scales
  • Frying pan
  • Mortar & pestle
  • Wooden spoon
  • Serving bowls
Ingredients:

  • 300g dried chickpeas (or 2 tins, drained and rinsed)
  • 1 teaspoon cumin seeds, plus a little extra to garnish
  • 1 teaspoon coriander seeds
  • ½ teaspoon mustard seeds
  • 1 hot, dried red chilli, crumbled
  • 1 teaspoon ground turmeric
  • 2.5cm piece fresh ginger
  • 1 tablespoon rice bran oil
  • 1 large onion
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 700ml chicken or vegetable stock
  • 250g potatoes
  • 150g kale (or cabbage)
  • Greek yogurt, to serve
  • A small handful coriander leaves

What to do:

  • Soak the chickpeas overnight in plenty of cold water.
  • Next day, drain, rinse and simmer them for about 30 minutes in fresh ­water until tender, then drain. (If using tinned, just drain and rinse.)
  • Peel and grate the ginger with the microplane zester. Peel, halve and finely slice the onion. Peel and finely chop the garlic. Peel and chop the potato into 3cm dice.
  • Wash and shake the kale leaves dry. Strip the leaves from the stem (discarding the stem) and finely shred the leaves. Wash and spin-dry the coriander and finely chop.
  • Put the frying pan over a medium heat and, when hot, dry-toast the cumin, coriander seeds and mustard seeds and the chilli for a couple of minutes ­until they smell ­really fragrant and the mustard starts to pop. Grind to a powder with the pestle and mortar, and mix in the turmeric and ginger.
  • Heat the oil in a large saucepan over a medium heat, and fry the onion, stirring regularly, until soft and golden brown. Stir in the garlic and spices, leave to cook for a minute or two, and add the stock. Simmer for five minutes, then add the chickpeas and potatoes. Cook until the spuds are tender, then add the kale. Cook for a few minutes, until the greens are tender, then serve with a dollop of thick yogurt on top, along with a ­sprinkling of toasted cumin seeds and some coriander leaves.

Notes: Why do we dry-toast the spices? What does to shred the leaves mean?

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Kitchen news – 2nd August 2012

With a crack of the starting pistol, we’re off! The Olympic fortnight has leapt from the springboard here in the cottage and we’ve been dishing up gold with our Brit chefs’ middle-eastern inspired menu of winning dishes… First up is a wonderful almost-spring (or almost-autumn, depending on which side of the world you are) recipe from Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall of chickpea, kale and potato curry, with Simon Rimmer’s carrot and chickpea falafel with herb yoghurt and pita bread, Gordon Ramsay’s very simple broccoli soup , Rose Elliott’s beetroot and quinoa tabbouleh and a wonderful dessert from the fab Jamie Oliver, who is right now trying to start up  a UK-version of a Kitchen Garden project inspired by our very own SAKGP, stewed rhubarb with vanilla yoghurt. Look for the recipes on this site soon!

We had a visit to the cottage yesterday afternoon from Mr Fielding and Mr Patterson, the School Education Directors and a group of potential SED high school students, who rolled up their sleeves and got stuck in with 5/6P… Much thanks to Fort St High, JJ Cahill Memorial, Sydney Secondary College and Randwick Girls’ for supplying us with such generous and talented cooks: well done Harriet, Henry, Olympia, Ciaran, Vickie & Gabriella for helping out so beautifully! And thanks always to Ms Parry, Ms Kendall, super-Ellie and Jill (our Wednesday arvo regular) – the food was extra-delicious…

And thanks again to all our volunteers for continuing to support our little program – every week I see and hear more and more reference in the newspapers, magazines, books and radio to the benefits of exposing children to good food, vegetables and ‘real food’ cooking, along with the necessity of organic horticulture and lessons of recycling, re-using etc and feel that we’re doing our small bit for the future health and well-being of our kids and the planet. Hooray!

And only one thing left to say now: Come on Aussies, come on!!!

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