Monthly Archives: October 2012

Cornersmith’s pickled beetroot

We pickled our own beetroot last week for the HalloweenFete… As long as your jars & lids are scrupulously clean and sterilised, the beautiful jars should last for ages! Not that our fete jars did however…

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Fresh from the garden: beetroot
Recipe source: Alex and Jamie at Cornersmith Café, Marrickville

Equipment:

  • Chopping boards and knives
  • Potato peelers
  • Food processor with vegetable blade attachment
  • Paper towel
  • Oven mitts
  • Large saucepan & wide pan
  • Tongs
  • Scales
  • Wooden spoon
  • Measures – cup, 1/4 cup, tablespoon
  • Glass jug for pouring
  • Jars and lids
  • Labels
Ingredients:

  • 3kg+ medium size beetroot
  • 1 litre white wine vinegar
  • 1 litre water
  • 1¾ cups raw sugar
  • ¼ cup salt
  • 2 tablespoons peppercorns
  • 2 tablespoons dried dill

 What to do:

  • Preheat the oven to 140C.
  • Wash the beets.  Trim off the leaves for another use.  Weigh the beetroot – you’ll need about 3kg. Peel the beets and add peels to compost.
  • Very thinly slice the beets using the blade attachment on the food processor.  (You could also use a large knife or a mandolin.)
  • Wash the jars and lids in hot soapy water, rinse well and drain upside down.
  • Place all the jars onto an oven tray, right side up, and slide into the oven to sterilize for 15 mins.
  • Dry lids with a clean piece of paper towel.
  • In a saucepan put vinegar, salt, water, sugar, peppercorns and dill. Gently heat until sugar is dissolved and then slowly bring to the boil.
  • Slide the tray of jars out of the oven and then carefully using tongs& an oven mitt, pack the sliced beets in.
  • Ladle the hot syrup into a glass jug and then pour over to cover beetroots. Leave a 5mm space at the top.
  • Seal immediately and leave to cool. Label when cool.
  • Leave to mature for at least a week.  The jars should be kept in a cool, dark place and will last at least 6 months if not a year!
  • Refrigerate after opening and eat within a month.

Notes:What other vegetables could we pickle? What other preserves could we make? Why do we sterilize the jars?

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Wild rocket, broad bean, radish & Reggiano salad

This salad is a beautiful celebration of Spring, with lots of lovely contrasting textures and flavours.

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Fresh from the garden: wild rocket, lettuces, broad beans, radishes, marjoram, edible flowers
Recipe source: Melissa, kitchen specialist Bondi PS

Equipment:

  • Saucepan & lid
  • Bowls – 2 large, 2 med, 1 small
  • Colander
  • 2 salad spinners
  • Paper towel
  • Mandoline
  • Potato peeler
  • Measuring – 1/4 cup, tablespoon, teaspoon
  • A small jar with lid
  • Plates or bowls to serve
Ingredients:

  • 2 large handfuls of wild rocket
  • A handful lettuce leaves
  • 500g broad beans in pod
  • 4 radishes
  • 2 sprigs marjoram
  • 50g parmigiano-reggiano
  • 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
  • A teaspoon of honey
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • Flaked salt & black pepper
  • Wild rocket or nasturtium flowers

What to do:

  • Fill the saucepan with water & set to boil on high heat.
  • Pod the broad beans, discarding the outer shell into the compost and add beans to the boiling water. Fill a large bowl with cold water and have ready.
  • Boil the broad beans for 3 minutes, drain and then immediately refresh in the bowl of cold water. Drain again and double-pod by slipping the outer shell off into the compost. Reserve beans.
  • Wash the rocket & lettuces really well and spin dry in sections, reserving in a large clean, dry bowl. Wash & dry the marjoram sprigs, picking the leaves and leaving whole.
  • Using the potato peeler, shave off thin slices of parmesan into the small bowl.
  • Scrub the radishes clean, wipe dry and using the mandoline or a peeler, carefully slice into thin discs.
  • For the dressing, measure the olive oil, red wine vinegar and honey and pour them into the jar. Add a sprinkle of salt and pepper, and then put the lid on & give the jar a good shake.
  • Drizzle the dressing around the large lettuce and rocket bowl and gently turn the leaves with your fingers.
  • Place the leaves in the serving bowls, scatter the broad beans and radish slices and then sprinkle over the marjoram leaves and parmesan shavings.
  • Finish by carefully placing the wild rocket flowers on top of the bowls of salad. Serve immediately!

Notes: Where does parmigiano-reggiano come from? Why do we use honey vinaigrette here instead of the lemony dressing? What do the wild rocket flowers taste like?

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Bruschetta with broad bean and parmesan mash

Broad beans are our veggie equivalent of blood oranges… Super-seasonal and only available at this time of year, so we just have to jump at the chance! We just love them and eat as many of them, and in as many ways as possible, in springtime!

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Fresh from the garden:broad beans, rocket, garlic, lemon thyme
Recipe source: Melissa, kitchen specialist at Bondi PS

Equipment:

  • Saucepan& lid
  • Bowls – big, med, small
  • Microplane zester & citrus juicer
  • Chopping board& bread knife
  • Measures – tablespoon
  • Scales
  • Grill trays
  • Colander
  • Mortar & pestle
  • Butter knife
  • Serving plates
Ingredients:

  • 1kg broad beans
  • Great sourdough bread (like Iggy’s)
  • 50g parmesan
  • 3 tablespoons E-V olive oil
  • A lemon
  • Cooking salt
  • Flaked salt & black pepper
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 5 sprigs thyme

What to do:

  • Fill the saucepan with water & set to boil with the lid on. Heat the grill.
  • Slice the bread thickly and place on grill trays, ready for grilling.
  • Pod the broad beans into the medium bowl and put the outer shells into the compost.
  • Zest the lemon and then cut it in half and juice one half only.
  • Wash and dry the thyme and pick from stems, and finely chop.
  • Grate the cheese into the small bowl.
  • When the water is boiling, drop all the broad beans in with a teaspoon of cooking salt. Put the lid back on to bring back to the boil quickly, and boil for 2 minutes. Fill the big bowl with cold water.
  • After 2 minutes, drain the broad beans into the colander & then immediately refresh in the bowl of cold water. Drain again & wipe the big bowl dry.
  • Double-pod the broad beans into the big bowl, discarding the outer skin into the compost.
  • Pound the broad beans with the pestle in the mortar with the olive oil & a pinch of salt (you may have to do this in 2 batches) until smooth – a few beanie lumps are fine!
  • Into the broad bean mixture stir the lemon zest and juice bit by bit, tasting as you go – and then the grated pecorino and herbs with a grind of pepper. Taste again for seasoning.
  • Slide the bread into the oven to grill & lightly toast, turning when needed & watching to make sure it doesn’t burn.
  • When ready bring toast out from the grill. Cut the end off the garlic cloves and rub each cut-side down on the toast a few times.
  • Spread a little broad bean paste onto each slice of toast (cut in half if large) & arrange onto serving plates with a good grind of pepper.

Notes: What does ‘double-pod’ mean? Why do we do this to the broad beans? What other name are broad beans known by?

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Kitchen News – 25th October 2012

We’re here! Term 4 and there’s much excitement brewing…

First up: the Halloween Fete! We’ve been jamming, pickling, bottling and canning our wares: some of our classes have been marvellously helping to add to our sale bounty for Sunday so come along to our stand for all your preserved needs! We’ll also have some award-winning tomato chilli jam and blood orange marmalade for sale so get in quick!

This Sunday, 28th October 10am to 3pm at Bondi Public School, 5 Wellington St Bondi.

Next: the official book launch – representatives from all classes will be helping prep and cook for our prestigious guests at Wednesday’s lunch – and we’re even cooking a course (or 3) in the pizza oven! Watch this space for news and photos of this auspicious event…

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And Christmas – well that’s a whole other kettle of fish so we’ll worry about that when the time comes!

Anyway, to business – it’s the Celebration of the Broad bean this week in the cottage, with 20kg+ harvested so far! So we’re going all out with bruschetta with broad bean and parmesan ‘mash’ and a salad of wild rocket, broad bean, radish & parmesan, honey dressing. We’ve been crunching our way too through crispy asparagus with lemon & herb aioli, and bottling Cornersmith’s recipes of pickled beetroot and also their Winter bouillon as mentioned above… and trialling for next week’s launch: Lavender honey cakes, which as you can imagine have been a total disaster popularity-wise…

All recipes will be up here by the weekend! Have a great week and we hope to see you on Sunday!

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Linguine with broad beans, lemon and garden herbs

Our Kitchen Garden students love making pasta – and this recipe sings of spring! It includes the dough mixture as well as instructions on how to use a pasta machine.

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Fresh from the garden: eggs, rocket, broad beans, lemon, marjoram, parsley, coriander, thyme
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 6 at home or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Salad spinner
  • Pasta machine
  • Scales, garlic press
  • Measures – teaspoon
  • Food processor
  • Plastic wrap
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Pastry brush, grater
  • Large stock pot & saucepan
  • Tongs, large & small bowls
  • Serving bowls
Ingredients:

  • 500g plain flour
  • 5 free-range eggs
  • Salt
  • 1kg broad beans in pod
  • A large handful of herbs
  • 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • A lemon
  • 4 garlic cloves
  • Flaked salt & black pepper
  • 50g parmesan

What to do:

To make the pasta:

  • Weigh the flour, then combine it with a teaspoon of salt in the large bowl.
  • Crack the eggs carefully into the small bowl, discarding any shell, then add them to the flour. Mix thoroughly, then tip the dough onto a clean, dry workbench.
  • Knead the dough for a few minutes, then wrap it in plastic film and let it rest for 1 hour at room temperature.

_________________________________________________________________

  • Fill the large stockpot and the saucepan with water and set to boil on high with the lids on.
  • Fix the pasta machine to a suitable bench or table – if the surface is not thick enough you may need to place a thick book under the machine. Screw the clamp very tightly.
  • Clear a large space on the workbench alongside the pasta machine. All surfaces must be clean and dry. Press or roll the dough into a rectangle about 8 cm wide.
  • Set the rollers on the pasta machine to the widest setting and pass the dough through. The dough will probably look quite ragged at this stage. Fold it in 3, turn it 90 degrees and roll it through again. Go to the next-thickest setting and pass the dough through 3-4 times.
  • Continue in this manner (changing the settings and passing the dough through) until the dough has passed through the second thinnest setting. Don’t use the very thinnest setting, as the dough gets too fine and is hard to manage. If the dough gets too long to handle comfortably, cut it into 2-3 pieces using the large knife, and roll each piece separately.
  • Lay the pasta strips on a lightly floured surface & dust with a little more flour. Attach the pasta cutter to the machine and pass through the largest rollers, draping it in your hands to catch.
  • Carefully separate each strip and hang over a pole to dry.
  • Clean the pasta machine by brushing it with a dry, wide pastry brush & putting back in its box.  

To finish the dish:

  • Check that the stockpot & saucepan have been filled with water and are set on high to boil.
  • Pod the broad beans, discarding the outer shell into the compost and add beans to the boiling water. Fill a large bowl with cold water and have ready.
  • Boil the broad beans for 3 minutes, drain and then immediately refresh in the bowl of cold water. Drain again and double-pod by slipping the outer shell off into the compost. Put the beans into the big bowl.
  • Wash and dry the lemon and zest it. Cut the lemon in half and squeeze its juice into the big bowl too.
  • Peel the garlic cloves and squeeze them through the garlic press into the bowl too.
  • Measure the parmesan and grate what you need. Wash and spin dry the herbs and strip their leaves, chopping with the mezzaluna, then add them into the garlicky broad bean bowl.
  • Measure 1/3 cup of olive oil into the bowl and sprinkle on a few pinches of flaked salt and toss to incorporate.
  • When the stockpot has started a fast boil, gather your drying pasta on a large baking tray. Add  a tablespoon of cooking salt and then the pasta to the pot, stir once and quickly put the lid back on.
  • As soon as the pot begins to boil again, take the lid off. The pasta should only take 1 or 2 minutes to cook from boiling. Taste to check – it’s important that the pasta remains al dente and is not overcooked!
  • Using tongs, carefully pull the pasta (and some of its cooking liquid) out and into the big lemony bowl, sprinkle half the parmesan on and toss thoroughly to incorporate.
  • Divide into serving bowls, sprinkle the remaining parmesan on and eat immediately!

Notes: Never wash the pasta machine – it will rust! Just brush down with a strong brush to remove the leftover dough.

 

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Orange and cardamom cakes with cream cheese icing

Orange and cardamom is such a fantastic combination and we use it a lot in cakes, but these two flavours can also be found in savoury dishes from places like Morocco and India.

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Fresh from the garden: oranges, eggs
Recipe source: adapted from Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden Cooking for Kids
Makes: 12 large or 24 small cupcakes

Equipment:

  • Cupcake cases
  • Scales
  • Measures:  ½ cup, ¼ cup, teaspoon
  • 12-hole cupcake tin
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Food processor
  • Citrus juicer
  • Bowls –  1 big, 2 medium
  • Grater, whisk, sifter
  • Wooden spoon, zester, spatula
  • 2 dessert spoons
  • Wire rack, skewer
  • Serving plates
Ingredients:

  • 125g butter at room temperature
  • 3/4 cups caster sugar
  • 2 large oranges
  • 2 eggs
  • 125g self-raising flour
  • 2 teaspoons ground cardamom

 

Cream cheese icing

  • 50g pure icing sugar
  • 50g cream cheese
  • 25g butter

 What to do:

  • Preheat the oven to 190°C.
  • Drop one of the paper cases into each hole of the cupcake tin.
  • Chop the butter into small cubes and drop into the food processor. Add the sugar and mix for 1 minute.
  • While this is being done grate the zest from the oranges and place in a medium bowl.
  • Juice the oranges and add to the zest.
  • Crack eggs into the orange mixture and lightly whisk to combine.
  • In a separate medium bowl sift the flour and ground cardamom together.
  • Add the egg and orange mixture and the sifted flour alternately to the butter mixture. Process until smooth and creamy.
  • Spoon the batter evenly into the cupcake tins until about 2/3 full and bake for about 15 minutes until cooked. Check by piercing one cake with a skewer & if clean, they’re ready! Carefully remove them from the oven and cool on the wire rack.
  • While the cake is cooking make the icing: Wash & dry the bowl & blade of the food processor.
  • Sift the icing sugar into the bowl and then mix all ingredients together until smooth and creamy.
  • Once cakes are cool use the spatula to spread a little icing on each cake, and then arrange on serving plates. Eat! 

Notes: What other spice and fruit combinations can you think of?

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Asparagus, feta and sweet potato frittate

You can also use pumpkin in this recipe instead of sweet potato: either works well. You can also cook one big frittata in a frying pan over heat and then finish it under the grill, but we pour ours into muffin pans to oven-bake… and add some of our lovely Bondi herbs for an aromatic twist.

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Fresh from the garden: eggs, asparagus, sweet potato, marjoram, thyme
Recipe source: Melissa
Makes: 12 large or 24 mini fritatte

Equipment:

  • Pastry brush
  • 12-hole cupcake tin
  • Chopping board & knives
  • Potato peelers, scissors
  • Salad spinner
  • Large frying pan
  • Grater, scales
  • Wooden spoon
  • Bowls – large, med, small
  • Tongs, whisk
  • Serving plates
Ingredients:

  • Half a large sweet potato
  • Half a bunch of asparagus spears
  • Small handful marjoram and thyme sprigs
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • Flaked salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 100g feta cheese
  • 10g parmesan
  • 6 large eggs

What to do:

  • Preheat the oven to 180C.
  • With the pastry brush, paint a little olive oil into each hole of the cupcake tins to grease.
  • Peel the sweet potato and carefully chop into 1cm cubes.
  • Trim the woody ends from the asparagus and then chop or snip into 1cm pieces.
  • Wash the herbs and spin them dry. Strip the leaves from the stalks & reserve.
  • Heat the frying pan with the oil and toss in the sweet potato. Season well with salt and pepper. Cook, turning occasionally, for about 4 minutes over medium heat until the cubes are just tender and lightly golden at the sides.
  • Meanwhile, cut the feta into small cubes and grate the parmesan.
  • Stir the asparagus into the sweet potato and cook for 2 minutes until just tender.
  • Then add the cubed feta and gently stir to mix in.
  • In the large bowl, lightly beat the eggs with the herbs, parmesan, a pinch of salt and a grind of pepper.
  • Divide the sweet potato mixture evenly into the cupcake holes, spoon the egg mixture over and bake in the oven for about 15 minutes until cooked.

Notes: Why is the name of this recipe frittate, ending in e? What other vegetables could you use in the recipe? What animals’ milk makes feta?

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Holiday program menu for 4 to 7 year olds

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4 to 7 year olds

Introduction
Good morning chooks!

MORNING TEA
Asparagus, feta & sweet potato frittate
Orange & cardamom cakes with cream cheese icing
Herbal tea*

Garden walk
Harvesting

LUNCH
Linguine with broad beans, lemon and garden herbs
Our spring salad with strawberries and flowers*

Goodbye chooks!

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We had such a lovely day with the little ones – 17 in all with a few keen-beans as young as 3 and one tiny tot helping! Every single one got stuck in to the grating, the spinning, snipping with the scissors, podding the broad beans – and then podding them again!

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I perhaps over-estimated what we could all do in the time we had… luckily I had some FANTASTIC mums who jumped right in, at the ready, and helped all our wee ones have a ball of a time… next time ladies, I will simplify it a bit – and will definitely get into the garden early on to avoid the scorching heat! (who’d a thunk it feeling the chilly weather today?!) But we got it all done and some absolutely dee-licious food on the table.

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It just makes me so happy to see these wee sprites getting in to it, and concentrating to get their jobs done – so many of them know all the herb names and can use kitchen equipment well… we have to thank shows such as masterchef for continuing to spread the good message about cooking!

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So now what happens? Back to school for term 4! I’m greedily compiling the menu for the next few weeks… globe artichokes, asparagus, beetroot… watch this space for some spring motivation!!! Meanwhile the last word on this post goes to this little poppet… don’t you just want to stuff her in a  sandwich and gobble her up, shoes ‘n all?!!!

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Our spring salad with strawberries and flowers

This is a lovely salad to pair with heavily flavoured dishes and is fun to prepare – try not to gobble all the strawberries first!

ourkitchengarden.net
Fresh from the garden: Beetroot, lettuces, rocket, strawberries, edible flowers, lemon, parsley, marjoram, thyme, coriander, oregano
Recipe source: Melissa

Equipment:

  • Medium saucepan
  • Bowls – 2 large
  • 2 salad spinners
  • Tea towel
  • Kitchen paper
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Mortar & pestle
  • Measure – 1/3 cup
  • Citrus juicer
  • Mezzaluna, teaspoon
  • Serving bowls, little tongs
Ingredients:

  • A bunch of baby beetroot
  • A large handful salad leaves
  • A few garnishing flowers
  • A handful of strawberries

Herby vinaigrette dressing

  • 1 small garlic clove
  • Flaked salt & black pepper
  • 1 lemon
  • 1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • A small handful mixed herbs:
    parsley, marjoram, thyme, coriander, oregano, chives

What to do:

  • Chop off the beetroot leaves, keeping any small leaves. Scrub the beets and place them whole into the medium saucepan and fill with cold water. Set to boil for about 20 minutes.
  • Fill up the 2 big bowls with cold water & wash the salad leaves, gently dunking them a handful at a time into the water, then pulling out to see if any dirt is left behind. Repeat in fresh water until no dirt remains. Spin the leaves dry and then wipe the bowls dry.
  • Wash the flowers separately and drain on a piece of paper towel. Keep the flowers reserved, picking off the petals to use.
  • Wash and spin dry the herbs, and pick off the leaves. Wash and hull the strawberries and slice.
  • Lay out the tea towel and line it with kitchen paper. Spread the salad leaves over the paper and roll the whole lot up like a log. Keep the rolled parcel of leaves in the fridge until needed.
  • When the beetroot are tender, drain them and place under running cold water until cool. Slip the skins off with your fingers and slice up.

To make the dressing:

  • Peel the garlic clove and put it in the mortar with a large pinch of salt. Pound to a paste.
  • Juice the lemon and add the juice to the mortar (without the pips) then stir the lot with the teaspoon and scrape it into a large bowl.
  • Stir in the olive oil and grind a little pepper, then whisk the dressing lightly. Add the herbs, chopping any large leaves in the mezzaluna if needed. Add to the dressing in the large bowl.

To assemble:

  • Unwrap the parcel of salad leaves & tip them into the bowl with the flower petals, herbs, strawberries, beetroot and the dressing. Gently turn the leaves in the dressing using your hands or tongs.
  • Transfer the salad to the serving bowls and serve immediately with little tongs.
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Rocket linguine with broad beans, lemon and marjoram

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Our Kitchen Garden students love making pasta – and this recipe sings of spring! It includes the dough mixture as well as instructions on how to use a pasta machine.

Fresh from the garden: eggs, rocket, broad beans, lemon, marjoram
Recipe source: Melissa

Equipment:

  • Salad spinner
  • Pasta machine
  • Scales, garlic press
  • Measures – teaspoon
  • Food processor
  • Plastic wrap
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Pastry brush, grater
  • Large stock pot & saucepan
  • Tongs, large bowls
  • Serving bowls
Ingredients:

  • 500g plain ‘00’ flour
  • 5 free-range eggs
  • Salt
  • 2 handfuls of rocket
  • 500g broad beans in pod
  • A handful of marjoram sprigs
  • 1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • A lemon
  • 3 garlic cloves
  • Flaked salt & black pepper
  • 50g parmesan

What to do:

To make the pasta:

  • Wash a handful of rocket thoroughly and spin dry. Discard any tough stalks and chop roughly.
  • Weigh the flour, then combine it with 1½ teaspoons of salt in the bowl of the food processor. With the motor running, add the eggs and the chopped rocket. Process for a few minutes until the dough clings together and feels quite springy.
  • Tip the dough onto a clean, dry workbench. Knead the dough for a few minutes, then wrap it in plastic film and let it rest for 1 hour at room temperature.

_________________________________________________________________

  • Fill the large stockpot and the saucepan with water and set to boil on high with the lids on.
  • Fix the pasta machine to a suitable bench or table – if the surface is not thick enough you may need to place a thick book under the machine. Screw the clamp very tightly.
  • Clear a large space on the workbench alongside the pasta machine. All surfaces must be clean and dry. Press or roll the dough into a rectangle about 8 cm wide.
  • Set the rollers on the pasta machine to the widest setting and pass the dough through. The dough will probably look quite ragged at this stage. Fold it in 3, turn it 90 degrees and roll it through again. Go to the next-thickest setting and pass the dough through 3-4 times.
  • Continue in this manner (changing the settings and passing the dough through) until the dough has passed through the second thinnest setting. Don’t use the very thinnest setting, as the dough gets too fine and is hard to manage. If the dough gets too long to handle comfortably, cut it into 2-3 pieces using the large knife, and roll each piece separately.
  • Lay the pasta strips on a lightly floured surface & dust with a little more flour. Attach the pasta cutter to the machine and pass through the largest rollers, draping it in your hands to catch.
  • Carefully separate each strip and hang over a pole to dry.
  • Clean the pasta machine by brushing it with a dry, wide pastry brush & putting back in its box.  

To finish the dish:

  • Check that the stockpot & saucepan have been filled with water and are set on high to boil.
  • Pod the broad beans, discarding the outer shell into the compost and add beans to the boiling water. Fill a large bowl with cold water and have ready.
  • Boil the broad beans for 3 minutes, drain and then immediately refresh in the bowl of cold water. Drain again and double-pod by slipping the outer shell off into the compost. Put the beans into the big bowl.
  • Wash and dry the lemon and zest it. Cut the lemon in half and squeeze its juice into the beans.
  • Peel the garlic cloves and squeeze them into the bowl too.
  • Measure the parmesan and grate what you need. Wash and spin dry the marjoram and strip leaves into the garlicky broad beans.
  • Wash and spin the remaining rocket dry and add that to the bowl.
  • Measure 1/3 cup of olive oil into the bowl and sprinkle on a few pinches of flaked salt and a good grind of pepper and toss to incorporate.
  • When the stockpot has started a fast boil, gather your drying pasta on a large baking tray. Add  a tablespoon of cooking salt and then the pasta to the pot, stir once and quickly put the lid back on.
  • As soon as the pot begins to boil again, take the lid off. The pasta should only take 2 minutes or so to cook from boiling. Taste to check – it’s important that the pasta remains al dente and is not overcooked!
  • Using tongs, carefully pull the pasta (and some of its cooking liquid) out and into the big lemony rocket bowl and toss to thoroughly incorporate.
  • Divide into serving bowls, sprinkle the parmesan on and eat immediately!

Notes: Never wash the pasta machine – it will rust! Just brush down with a strong brush to remove the leftover dough.

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