Posts Tagged With: spring

Silverbeet and garam masala soup

Garam is the Hindi word for hot, and masala, spice mixture. We often make our own garam masala blend of ground cumin, coriander, ginger and turmeric, cayenne and mustard seeds at school but it is commonly available in the spice section of any supermarket, already blended.

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Fresh from the garden: silverbeet (Swiss chard), onion, potatoes, garlic, coriander

Recipe source: Melissa

Serves: 6 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Kettle
  • Chopping boards and knives
  • Selection of mixing bowls
  • Paper towel
  • Stockpot
  • Flat-ended wooden spoon
  • Measures: jug, tablespoon, teaspoon
  • Garlic press
  • Ladle
  • Stick blender
  • Serving bowls
Ingredients:

  • 1.5 litres boiling water and 2 tablespoons bouillon (or 1.5 litres vegetable stock)
  • 2 medium potatoes
  • 1 brown onion
  • 4 garlic cloves
  • A large bunch of silverbeet
  • Olive oil
  • A heaped teaspoon garam masala
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • Flaked salt
  • A small handful of coriander

What to do:

  1. Fill the kettle to 1.5 litres and set it to boil.
  2. Wash or scrub the potatoes under running water (but don’t peel!) and then coarsely chop into 2cm cubes.
  3. Peel the onion and slice into two halves, then finely chop. Peel and chop the garlic.
  4. Wash the silverbeet & shake over the sink. Finely chop the silverbeet, using the whole stalk and leaves as well.
  5. Pour olive oil to cover the base of the stockpot and heat over medium heat for 30 seconds. Add the chopped onion and cook on low, stirring every now and then, for 5 minutes and then add the potato and cook for another few minutes.
  6. Add in the garlic, chopped silverbeet and the garam masala and stir together. Cook very gently for a minute until aromatic.
  7. Increase heat to high. Add the 1½ litres of hot water and the 2 tablespoons of bouillon and bring to the boil, then simmer gently, uncovered, for 10 minutes or until the potato is almost tender.
  8. Meanwhile wash and pat the coriander dry and finely chop.
  9. When the soup is ready and the potato is soft, grind a little bit of pepper in too and taste to see if you need to add any extra salt.
  10. Add in the coriander and then blitz the soup with the stick blender until it’s really smooth.
  11. Taste and add more salt if you need to.
  12. Ladle soup among serving bowls and serve!

 Notes: What do is silverbeet also known as? What is in the garam masala blend? Why do potato-based soups need more salt?

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Leafy salad with poached eggs, kale and herby mayo

ourkitchengarden.net

The list of ingredients we can add to a salad is endless… here at Bondi we base our salads on lettuce leaves, fresh herbs and then seasonal additions. This one is a favourite with just-poached eggs and a wonderfully creamy and tangy dressing, but the key is to show the children how to handle delicate lettuce leaves without crushing or bruising them (the lettuce, not the kids…) and the gentle art of cracking an egg without destroying the yolk!

Fresh from the garden: Lettuce, eggs, kale, edible flowers, spring onions, garlic, lemon, herbs

Recipe source: Melissa

Serves: 6 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

·       Mixing bowls – large, medium, small

·       2 salad spinners

·       Tea towels and paper towel

·       Chopping boards & knives

·       Saucepan and lid

·       Deep-sided non-stick frying pan

·       Slotted spoon

·       Stick blender &its cup

·       Measuring: jug, ½ cup, teaspoon

·       Scales

·       Scissors

·       Garlic press

·       Citrus juicer

·       Serving bowls

Ingredients:

  • 4 freshest eggs (plus two for the mayo)
  • A bunch of salad leaves & kale
  • A large handful of herbs
  • A few garnishing flowers
  • Any extras like radishes
  • White wine vinegar & olive oil

For the herby mayonnaise:

  • A small handful fresh herbs
  • 1 juicy lemon
  • 1 small garlic clove
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 1/2 cup rice bran oil
  • Flaked salt & black pepper

What to do:

For the salad:

  1. Fill up the 2 big bowls with cold water & wash the salad leaves in several changes of water. Spin the leaves dry and wipe the bowls dry.
  2. Lay out the tea towel and line it with kitchen paper. Spread the salad leaves over the paper and roll the whole lot up like a log. Keep the rolled parcel of leaves in the fridge until needed.
  3. Reserve the small garnishing leaves and flowers in a separate little bowl of cold water.
  4. Wash the kale and shake dry. Snip the leaves from the stalks and discard the stalks. Spin dry thoroughly, then put in a clean dry bowl, drizzle a little olive oil and a pinch of salt, and then massage the salty oil into the leaves with your fingers for 5 minutes.
  5. Fill up another bowl with water and wash the herbs. Spin the herbs dry and pick leaves, reserving in their own small bowl, discarding stalks into compost.
  6. Scrub the radishes and then finely slice using a sharp knife or a mandoline slicer. 

For the mayo:

  1. Meanwhile for the mayo, wash the herbs in a few changes of water, spin them dry and finely strip off leaves from the stalks (coriander stalks you can leave in).
  2. Cut the lemon in half and juice the halves. You will need 2 tablespoons lemon juice in total.
  3. Smash the garlic clove, peel it and squeeze it through the garlic press.
  4. Carefully separate the eggs and reserve the yolks in a small bowl.
  5. Into the stick blender cup add the egg yolks, the mustard and 2 teaspoons only of the lemon juice. Whizz together until all is combined.
  1. Measure the rice bran oil, then get a friend to help measure in the oil a tablespoon at a time every 30 seconds into the egg mixture while you are whizzing (this takes a few minutes so don’t rush it).
  2. Then slowly add in another 2 teaspoons of lemon juice, the pressed garlic, the herbs and a good sprinkle of salt and pepper. Blend until smooth. Taste and check if it needs any more lemon juice or salt and adjust if needed.

To poach the eggs:

  1. Fill the deep-sided frying pan with water to a depth of about 10cm, then bring it to the boil and then turn down to a bare simmer.
  2. Then break the eggs into separate little bowls, then slide them into the simmering water, one at a time until they’re all in, and let them cook, uncovered, for 4 minutes. Fill a large bowl with cold water.
  3. Then use a draining spoon to lift them from the water and transfer them to the bowl of cold water if you’re not ready to use them just yet.

To serve:

  1. Strip the kale leaves into smaller pieces and add them to the separate bowl. Drizzle over a little olive oil and pinch of flaked salt and then using your fingertips, rub it all in to the kale leaves to make them soft.
  2. Take the lettuce from the fridge and chop into smaller strips. Pop them into a big bowl, then drizzle about a teaspoon of olive oil, a teaspoon of white wine vinegar & a sprinkle of flaked salt over the whole lot.
  3. Add the kale into the lettuce and using your hands, turn the leaves to coat in the dressing and then divide the lot among your serving bowls.
  4. Spoon an egg at a time out of the water and dry off with some paper towel or a clean tea towel, and then carefully arrange one egg on the top of each salad.
  5. Drizzle the mayo over the top of each salad, followed by a sprinkle of herbs and the flowers and serve immediately!

Notes: What is mayo short for? What other salad dressings could you use? Why do we need to wash the leaves so well? Why do we roll the leaves up to put them in the fridge? Why don’t we always need to use vinegar to poach the eggs? Why do we put the eggs into cold water?

ourkitchengarden.net

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Salad of baby beets, broad beans and goats cheese

We love the arrival of broad beans to signify the warm weather! This salad is a firm favourite of ours, with its contrasting flavours and textures.

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: broad beans, beetroot, beetroot leaves, lettuce leaves, marjoram, garlic
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 6 at home or 24 tastes 

Equipment:

  • Chopping board & knife
  • 2 x saucepans with lids
  • Colander, scissors
  • Paper towel
  • Measuring: tablespoon, teaspoon
  • Bowls – large, small
  • Garlic press
  • Salad spinner
  • Fork, skewer
  • Plates to serve
Ingredients:

  • 4 baby beetroot
  • A large handful of broad beans
  • A handful of lettuce leaves
  • Small sprig of marjoram
  • 1 garlic clove
  • 2 teaspoons aged balsamic
  • Flaked salt and black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • A small roll of goats’ cheese

ourkitchengarden.net

What to do:

  • Cut the leaves from the beetroot, leaving about 2cms of stalk. Reserve any small leaves.
  • Gently scrub the beets under water to remove any dirt and place them in the saucepan with cold water to cover by about 5cm. Heat on high with lid on and boil for 20 minutes until soft when pierced with a skewer.
  • Fill the other saucepan with water and set on high to boil.
  • Pod the broad beans, discarding the outer shell into the compost and add beans to the boiling water. Fill a large bowl with cold water and have ready.
  • Boil the broad beans for 3 minutes, drain and then immediately refresh in the bowl of cold water. Drain again and double-pod by slipping the outer shell off into the compost. Put the beans into a medium bowl.
  • Carefully separate out, then wash the lettuce and beetroot leaves and spin dry. Break up into smaller pieces with your hands if needed, then roll up into a kitchen paper-lined tea towel & place in the fridge until needed.
  • Wash, dry and pick the marjoram leaves and reserve for the garnish.
  • Squeeze the garlic through the garlic press into a large bowl, then mix in the balsamic vinegar and olive oil, season with salt and pepper and stir together gently.
  • Meanwhile when the beetroot are soft, drain the saucepan and fill with cold water to cool the beets. When cool to handle, slide off the skins and root and thinly slice the beetroot. Add the slices to the dressing and toss to soak.
  • To finish, divide the salad leaves among your serving plates and scatter the beetroot slices on top. Scatter the broad beans over the top, then remove the wrapping from the goats’ cheese and dab chunks of cheese over each salad. Drizzle over the remaining dressing, sprinkle with the marjoram and serve.

ourkitchengarden.net

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Cauliflower and nutmeg soup

Silky and spiced, creamy and smooth – we love cauliflower soup! And with a little crunchy addition of speedy croutons, we’re in heaven!

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: cauliflower, leeks, onion, potato, garlic
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 6 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Kettle
  • Garlic press, peeler
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Stockpot
  • Measures – tablespoon, jug
  • Wooden spoon
  • Large & med bowls
  • Stick blender
  • Mouli
  • Microplane grater
  • Ladle
  • Serving bowls
Ingredients:

  • 1 leek
  • 1 brown onion
  • 4 cloves of garlic
  • 1 large potato
  • A large head of cauliflower
  • Extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1.5 lt water & 1.5 tablespoons bouillon (or 1.5 litres stock)
  • White pepper & flaked salt
  • A whole nutmeg

 What to do:

  • Fill the kettle and set to boil.
  • Wash the leek, scoring and peeling the outer layers off to look for hidden dirt, and then finely chop the leek.
  • Peel and finely chop the onion. Peel the potato under running water and chop into 1cm cubes.
  • Peel and squeeze the garlic cloves through the press.
  • Wash, shake dry and cut or tear the cauliflower into small florets.
  • Heat the 2 tablespoons of olive oil in the stockpot. Add the leek and onion and fry gently for 5 minutes.
  • Carefully measure the boiling water into the jug and add the bouillon. Stir.
  • Add the cauliflower, the potato and the garlic and sweat for a minute, then add the hot stock.
  • Simmer for 20 minutes until the cauliflower is tender. Season with salt and ground white pepper and puree with the stick blender until very smooth.
  • You may need to pass the soup through the mouli into another bowl to achieve an even smoother texture.
  • Just before serving, grate in about half a nutmeg using the microplane grater, the ladle out into your bowls.

 Notes: What other vegetables can be used for soup? Why do we sweat the veggies out?

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Salad of broad beans, radishes and goats cheese

This salad is a beautiful celebration of spring, with lots of lovely contrasting textures and flavours…

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: lettuces, broad beans, radishes, snap peas, marjoram, edible flowers
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 6 at home or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Saucepan & lid
  • Bowls – 2 large, 2 med, 1 small
  • Colander
  • 2 salad spinners
  • Paper towel
  • Mandoline
  • Potato peeler
  • Measuring – 1/4 cup, tablespoon, teaspoon
  • A small jar with lid
  • Plates or bowls to serve
Ingredients:

  • A handful lettuce leaves
  • A large handful broad beans in pod
  • A small handful radishes
  • A small punnet snap peas
  • 2 sprigs marjoram
  • 150g goats’ cheese
  • 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
  • A teaspoon of honey
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • Flaked salt & black pepper
  • Edible flowers

What to do:

  • Fill the saucepan with water & set to boil on high heat.
  • Pod the broad beans, discarding the outer shell into the compost and add beans to the boiling water. Fill a large bowl with cold water and have ready.
  • Boil the broad beans for 3 minutes, drain and then immediately refresh in the bowl of cold water. Drain again and double-pod by slipping the outer shell off into the compost. Reserve beans.
  • Wash the lettuce leaves really well and spin dry in sections, reserving in a large clean, dry bowl. Wash & dry the marjoram sprigs, picking the leaves and leaving whole. Gently wash the flowers and reserve on a piece of paper towel until ready to use.
  • Scrub the radishes clean, wipe dry and using the mandoline or a peeler, carefully slice into thin discs.
  • Wash the snap peas, then top-and-tail each one, de-stringing as you go. Slice each bean in half or thirds.
  • For the dressing, measure the olive oil, red wine vinegar and honey and pour them into the jar. Add a sprinkle of salt and pepper, and then put the lid on & give the jar a good shake.
  • Drizzle the dressing around the large lettuce bowl and gently turn the leaves with your fingers.
  • Place the leaves in the serving bowls, then pour the broad beans, radish slices and snap peas into the bowl and mix to cover in the residual dressing. Then sprinkle over each bowl of leaves.
  • Break the goats cheese into small chunks with your fingers and divide over the salads with the marjoram leaves.
  • Finish by carefully placing the flowers on top of the bowls of salad. Serve immediately!

Notes: What does residual mean? Why do we use honey vinaigrette here instead of our usual lemony dressing? Can you name some edible flowers?

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Carrot and fennel soup

We love all the different combinations of vegetables that the seasons throw at us… and adding various spices can change everything! This is a lovely silky variation of soup…

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: carrot, fennel, onion, thyme, coriander
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 6 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Kettle
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Scales
  • Potato peelers
  • Graters
  • Paper towel
  • Stockpot & lid
  • Measures: jug, tablespoon, teaspoon
  • Bowls – big, medium, small
  • Wooden spoon
  • Medium heavy-bottomed saucepan
  • Stick blender
  • Serving bowls
Ingredients:

  • 2 onions
  • 1 large thyme sprig
  • ½ teaspoon cumin seeds
  • 50g butter
  • 1kg carrots
  • A head of fennel
  • 1.25 litre stock (or 1 tablespoon bouillon & 1.25 litre boiling water)
  • Cooking salt
  • Flaked salt and black pepper
  • A little bunch of coriander

 What to do:

  • Fill the kettle if using and set to boil.
  • Peel and thinly slice the onions. Wash and pat dry the thyme sprig and strip off the leaves.
  • Melt the butter in the stockpot, then add the onions, the cumin and thyme, and cook over a low heat until tender for about 10 minutes.
  • Meanwhile, wash & peel the carrots, then grate them and reserve in a big bowl.
  • Wash, then top and tail the fennel, discarding the discoloured outer layer if desired. Slice the fennel as thin as you can.
  • After the 10 minutes, add the carrots & fennel to the onion and add a teaspoon of salt. Stir, then cook gently for 5 minutes with the lid on.
  • Add the stock or bouillon and water, bring to the boil then lower the heat and simmer until the carrots & fennel are tender, about 20 minutes.
  • Wash the coriander and spin dry. Pick the leaves from the stalks and very finely chop the stalks. Gently chop the leaves but leave them quite big.
  • When done, blitz with the stick blender, season to taste and serve into your bowls. Garnish with the chopped coriander.
  • Serve right away or chill overnight to serve cold the next day, perhaps with a little sour cream drizzled in…

Notes: What is bouillon? How do you make stock? Why do we leave the coriander leaves quite big?

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Fish-free salad Nicoise

Hugh says, ‘Without any tuna or anchovies, I guess you might upset the good people of Nice a bit with this one, but it is an exceptionally delicious and substantial salad – with plenty going on.’

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: new potatoes, green beans, eggs, small lettuce leaves, olives, basil, garlic
Recipe source: Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, Veg Every Day
Serves: 4 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Scales
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Saucepans – med, small
  • Colander
  • Small jar & lid
  • Measures: tablespoon, teaspoon
  • Salad spinner
  • Serving plates
Ingredients:

  • 500g new (baby) potatoes
  • 200g green beans
  • 8 large eggs at room temperature
  • A small handful baby lettuce leaves
  • A handful small black olives
  • About 12 basil leaves
  • Flaked salt and black pepper

For the dressing:

  • ½ small garlic clove
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon cider vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • A pinch of sugar

 What to do:

  • Wash the beans and potatoes – do not peel them! Tail the beans & chop into 3cm lengths.
  • You can cook small new potatoes whole, but cut any larger ones in half or smaller, so they’re all roughly the same size. Cover with cold water in the medium saucepan, add salt and bring to the boil. Reduce the heat and simmer for 8-12 minutes until tender, adding the beans for the last 4 minutes. Drain, tip into a bowl and leave to cool.
  • To cook the eggs, bring a small saucepan of water to the boil. Add the eggs, return to a simmer, then cook for 7 minutes. Lightly crack the shells and run the eggs under cold water for a minute or two to stop the cooking, then leave to cool. Peel and quarter the eggs.
  • To make the dressing, put all the ingredients into a screw-topped jar, seasoning with salt and pepper, and shake until emulsified.
  • Halve, quarter or thickly slice the cooked potatoes. Put them back with the beans, add some of the dressing and toss gently together.
  • Wash the lettuce & basil leaves in several changes of water. Spin-dry and then gently toss in a bowl with a little of the dressing.
  • Arrange the lettuce, potatoes, and beans on your serving plates and distribute the olives and eggs over the salad. Scatter with torn basil leaves, trickle over the remainingdressing and grind over some pepper. Serve straight away.

Notes: What does emulsified mean? What does the adjective Niçoise mean?

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Linguine with broad beans, lemon and garden herbs

Our Kitchen Garden students love making pasta – and this recipe sings of spring! It includes the dough mixture as well as instructions on how to use a pasta machine.

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: eggs, rocket, broad beans, lemon, marjoram, parsley, coriander, thyme
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 6 at home or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Salad spinner
  • Pasta machine
  • Scales, garlic press
  • Measures – teaspoon
  • Food processor
  • Plastic wrap
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Pastry brush, grater
  • Large stock pot & saucepan
  • Tongs, large & small bowls
  • Serving bowls
Ingredients:

  • 500g plain flour
  • 5 free-range eggs
  • Salt
  • 1kg broad beans in pod
  • A large handful of herbs
  • 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • A lemon
  • 4 garlic cloves
  • Flaked salt & black pepper
  • 50g parmesan

What to do:

To make the pasta:

  • Weigh the flour, then combine it with a teaspoon of salt in the large bowl.
  • Crack the eggs carefully into the small bowl, discarding any shell, then add them to the flour. Mix thoroughly, then tip the dough onto a clean, dry workbench.
  • Knead the dough for a few minutes, then wrap it in plastic film and let it rest for 1 hour at room temperature.

_________________________________________________________________

  • Fill the large stockpot and the saucepan with water and set to boil on high with the lids on.
  • Fix the pasta machine to a suitable bench or table – if the surface is not thick enough you may need to place a thick book under the machine. Screw the clamp very tightly.
  • Clear a large space on the workbench alongside the pasta machine. All surfaces must be clean and dry. Press or roll the dough into a rectangle about 8 cm wide.
  • Set the rollers on the pasta machine to the widest setting and pass the dough through. The dough will probably look quite ragged at this stage. Fold it in 3, turn it 90 degrees and roll it through again. Go to the next-thickest setting and pass the dough through 3-4 times.
  • Continue in this manner (changing the settings and passing the dough through) until the dough has passed through the second thinnest setting. Don’t use the very thinnest setting, as the dough gets too fine and is hard to manage. If the dough gets too long to handle comfortably, cut it into 2-3 pieces using the large knife, and roll each piece separately.
  • Lay the pasta strips on a lightly floured surface & dust with a little more flour. Attach the pasta cutter to the machine and pass through the largest rollers, draping it in your hands to catch.
  • Carefully separate each strip and hang over a pole to dry.
  • Clean the pasta machine by brushing it with a dry, wide pastry brush & putting back in its box.  

To finish the dish:

  • Check that the stockpot & saucepan have been filled with water and are set on high to boil.
  • Pod the broad beans, discarding the outer shell into the compost and add beans to the boiling water. Fill a large bowl with cold water and have ready.
  • Boil the broad beans for 3 minutes, drain and then immediately refresh in the bowl of cold water. Drain again and double-pod by slipping the outer shell off into the compost. Put the beans into the big bowl.
  • Wash and dry the lemon and zest it. Cut the lemon in half and squeeze its juice into the big bowl too.
  • Peel the garlic cloves and squeeze them through the garlic press into the bowl too.
  • Measure the parmesan and grate what you need. Wash and spin dry the herbs and strip their leaves, chopping with the mezzaluna, then add them into the garlicky broad bean bowl.
  • Measure 1/3 cup of olive oil into the bowl and sprinkle on a few pinches of flaked salt and toss to incorporate.
  • When the stockpot has started a fast boil, gather your drying pasta on a large baking tray. Add  a tablespoon of cooking salt and then the pasta to the pot, stir once and quickly put the lid back on.
  • As soon as the pot begins to boil again, take the lid off. The pasta should only take 1 or 2 minutes to cook from boiling. Taste to check – it’s important that the pasta remains al dente and is not overcooked!
  • Using tongs, carefully pull the pasta (and some of its cooking liquid) out and into the big lemony bowl, sprinkle half the parmesan on and toss thoroughly to incorporate.
  • Divide into serving bowls, sprinkle the remaining parmesan on and eat immediately!

Notes: Never wash the pasta machine – it will rust! Just brush down with a strong brush to remove the leftover dough.

 

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Our spring salad with strawberries and flowers

This is a lovely salad to pair with heavily flavoured dishes and is fun to prepare – try not to gobble all the strawberries first!

ourkitchengarden.net
Fresh from the garden: Beetroot, lettuces, rocket, strawberries, edible flowers, lemon, parsley, marjoram, thyme, coriander, oregano
Recipe source: Melissa

Equipment:

  • Medium saucepan
  • Bowls – 2 large
  • 2 salad spinners
  • Tea towel
  • Kitchen paper
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Mortar & pestle
  • Measure – 1/3 cup
  • Citrus juicer
  • Mezzaluna, teaspoon
  • Serving bowls, little tongs
Ingredients:

  • A bunch of baby beetroot
  • A large handful salad leaves
  • A few garnishing flowers
  • A handful of strawberries

Herby vinaigrette dressing

  • 1 small garlic clove
  • Flaked salt & black pepper
  • 1 lemon
  • 1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • A small handful mixed herbs:
    parsley, marjoram, thyme, coriander, oregano, chives

What to do:

  • Chop off the beetroot leaves, keeping any small leaves. Scrub the beets and place them whole into the medium saucepan and fill with cold water. Set to boil for about 20 minutes.
  • Fill up the 2 big bowls with cold water & wash the salad leaves, gently dunking them a handful at a time into the water, then pulling out to see if any dirt is left behind. Repeat in fresh water until no dirt remains. Spin the leaves dry and then wipe the bowls dry.
  • Wash the flowers separately and drain on a piece of paper towel. Keep the flowers reserved, picking off the petals to use.
  • Wash and spin dry the herbs, and pick off the leaves. Wash and hull the strawberries and slice.
  • Lay out the tea towel and line it with kitchen paper. Spread the salad leaves over the paper and roll the whole lot up like a log. Keep the rolled parcel of leaves in the fridge until needed.
  • When the beetroot are tender, drain them and place under running cold water until cool. Slip the skins off with your fingers and slice up.

To make the dressing:

  • Peel the garlic clove and put it in the mortar with a large pinch of salt. Pound to a paste.
  • Juice the lemon and add the juice to the mortar (without the pips) then stir the lot with the teaspoon and scrape it into a large bowl.
  • Stir in the olive oil and grind a little pepper, then whisk the dressing lightly. Add the herbs, chopping any large leaves in the mezzaluna if needed. Add to the dressing in the large bowl.

To assemble:

  • Unwrap the parcel of salad leaves & tip them into the bowl with the flower petals, herbs, strawberries, beetroot and the dressing. Gently turn the leaves in the dressing using your hands or tongs.
  • Transfer the salad to the serving bowls and serve immediately with little tongs.
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Only 3 places available!

 

 

 

 

 

Two spots free on Tuesday 2nd October and one available on Wednesday 3rd – jump to it! Text your email address to 0414 978 957 & I’ll shoot you through a booking form right away…

I’m finalising the program’s menus in the next few days and I can’t wait to use all the beautiful spring produce that’s available: I’ve seen fat broad beans, juicy strawberries, crunchy beetroot, aromatic marjoram and so much more – yum yum – watch this space!

Mx

ourkitchengarden.net

 

 

 

 

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