Posts Tagged With: spices

Autumn salad with crunchy croutons

We play around with all sort of ingredients in our salads, and this autumn we’ve had beautiful watermelon radishes to include too, as well as the most more-ish spicy croutons.

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: lettuce and salad leaves, tomatoes, radishes, flowers, herbs, lemon
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 6 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Small saucepan
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Baking sheet & baking paper
  • Scales
  • Chopping boards & knife
  • Bowls – large, medium, small
  • Small saucepan
  • 2 salad spinners
  • Tea towels, paper towel
  • Mortar & pestle
  • Citrus juicer
  • Measures: 1/3 cup, tablespoon, teaspoon, ½ & ¼ teaspoon
  • Whisk, tongs
  • Serving bowls

 

 

 

Ingredients:

For the croutons

  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • Half a loaf of sourdough bread
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cayenne
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper

For the salad

  • A big bunch salad leaves (lettuces, tatsoi)
  • A few edible flowers & leaves
  • Tomatoes, radishes, spring onions

Herby vinaigrette dressing

  • 1 clove garlic
  • Flaked salt & black pepper
  • 1 lemon
  • 1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • A small handful herbs

What to do:

  • For the croutons: Preheat the oven to 200C. Gently melt the butter in the small saucepan.
  • Carefully cut the bread into slices and then into cubes.
  • Combine the melted butter and tablespoon of olive oil in a large bowl. Add the cubes of bread, and toss until coated. Sprinkle with salt, cayenne pepper, and black pepper, toss until evenly coated. Spread the bread in a single layer on a baking paper-lined sheet. Bake until croutons are golden for about 10 minutes.
  • For the salad: Fill up 2 big bowls with cold water & wash the salad leaves in several changes of water. Spin dry and wipe the bowls dry. Lay out the tea towel and line it with paper towel. Spread the salad leaves over the paper and roll the whole lot up like a log. Keep the rolled parcel of leaves in the fridge until needed.
  • Fill up the medium bowl with water and wash the herbs and small garnishing leaves & flowers. Dry on a piece of paper towel and reserve in a small bowl. Wash and drain the radishes, tomatoes and spring onions (peeling outer layer) & slice into small pieces.
  • For the vinaigrette: Peel the garlic clove and put it in the mortar with a large pinch of salt. Pound to a paste. Juice the lemon and add the juice to the mortar (without pips) then stir the lot with a teaspoon and scrape it into a large mixing bowl. Stir in the oil and grind some pepper, then whisk the dressing lightly. Wash and pat the herb sprigs dry and pick off the leaves, and add to the dressing.
  • To finish: Unwrap the parcel of salad leaves & tip them into the bowl with the dressing. Gently turn the leaves in the dressing using your hands or tongs, and then transfer the dressed leaves to the serving bowls. Place the tomatoes, radishes & spring onion in the dressing and then add to the salad with garnishing flowers & leaves. Serve immediately with croutons scattered on top.
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Lavash crackers

We always need something to mop up our soups, sauces, dressings or dips – or simply a scrumptious blob of egg yolk!

ourkitchengarden.net

Recipe source: adapted from a recipe in the book Home Made by Yvette Van Boven
Serves: 8 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • An eggcup
  • Scales
  • Stand mixer and dough hook
  • Measures: a jug, tablespoon, teaspoon
  • Pastry brush
  • Baking paper
  • 2 baking trays
  • Oven mitts
  • Serving plates
Ingredients:

  • 2g yeast
  • 400g plain flour
  • A pinch of salt
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil plus extra to grease
  • Approx. 250ml lukewarm water

Garnish:

  • A small amount of poppy seeds or sesame seeds, caraway seeds, ground paprika, cumin seeds or flaked salt

What to do:

  • Measure the lukewarm water and then out of the that, pour out an eggcup full of water. Dissolve the yeast in the eggcupful of water and then combine all the ingredients – except for the rest of the water – in the bowl of the stand mixer and mix together with the dough hook.
  • Start to pour the rest of the water in, a little at a time, until a pliable dough ball is formed. Pay attention, sometimes you need a little less water.
  • Knead the dough for about 5 minutes and then finish off on a worktop lightly dusted with flour until smooth and silky.
  • Leave to rise for an hour.

 At the beginning of the lesson:

  • Preheat the oven to 175C. Using a teaspoon of vegetable oil and a pastry brush, grease the baking trays.
  • Roll the dough into a thin sheet (you may need to divide it into several pieces), place on a big sheet of baking paper and then onto the greased baking trays.
  • Lightly cover with water, flicking with your fingers, and sprinkle with your choice of garnish – doing this in nice strips for example.
  • Bake the dough in the preheated oven for 12-15 minutes until the crackers turn an even golden brown. Use this time to make the dough for the next class, if needed, and then clean up.
  • When the crackers are ready, remove from the oven, leave to cool for a few minutes and then break into equal parts. Divide among plates and serve with something dippy or saucy 😉

Notes: Why do we leave to dough for an hour? What other spices or herbs could you use? How many verbs can you name in this recipe?

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Warm salad of Nolans Road chickpeas, kale and Greek yoghurt

We love our Nolans Road organic Kabuli chickpeas – they’re so fresh they only need about half the cooking time of normal chickpeas – and so worthwhile doing from scratch! Dee Nolan suggests soaking and cooking heaps more than you need, then freezing the rest for another time as they’re easily resurrected!

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: kale, carrots, garlic, mint, coriander, lemon
Recipe source: inspired by the recipes of Yotam Ottolenghi

Equipment:

  • Bowls – glass, large, small
  • Saucepans – med, large & heavy
  • Sieve & colander
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Salad spinner
  • Peeler
  • Garlic press
  • Measures – ½ cup, 1/3 cup, tablespoon, teaspoon
  • Scales
  • Mezzaluna
  • Citrus juicer
  • Serving bowls
Ingredients:

  • 200g dried chickpeas
  • 1 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
  • A large handful kale leaves
  • 1/3 cup olive oil, plus extra to finish
  • 3 medium carrots
  • 1 teaspoon caraway seeds
  • 1 garlic clove
  • A small handful mint
  • A small handful coriander
  • 1 lemon
  • Cooking salt, flaked salt and black pepper
  • 1/2 cup Greek yogurt

What to do:

  • Soak the chickpeas overnight in plenty of cold water with a teaspoon of bicarb.*
  • Next day, drain, rinse and simmer them in a big saucepan or about 25 minutes in fresh ­water until tender, then drain.
  • Meanwhile, half-fill the smaller saucepan with water and a teaspoon of salt and set it to boil.
  • Strip the kale leaves from the stalks, discarding the stalks. Roll the leaves up and cut into fine ribbons, then blanch them in the boiling water for 5 minutes. Drain then refresh under cold running water and squeeze dry.
  • Meanwhile peel then chop the carrots into small dice.
  • Wash and spin the mint (picking the mint leaves) and coriander, then finely chop.
  • Cut the lemon in two and squeeze one half. Peel then crush the garlic clove.
  • Heat up the olive oil in a large saucepan. Add the carrots and caraway seeds and sauté for 5 minutes on medium heat. Add the kale, the drained chickpeas and continue cooking for another 5 minutes.
  • Now add the garlic, herbs, a tablespoon of lemon juice and a sprinkle of salt and pepper. Remove from the heat and leave to cool for a few minutes. Taste and adjust the seasoning.
  • To serve, mix together the yogurt with a tablespoon of olive oil and another sprinkle of flaked salt and pepper. Pile the vegetables on serving dishes and spoon the yogurt on top. Sprinkle with freshly ground pepper and serve.

 Notes: Why do we soak the chickpeas overnight? What are other names for chickpeas?

*If you forget to soak the chickpeas the night before (as I have done in the cottage on more than one occasion (!) then boil the chickpeas for an hour and then leave them to soak in that same liquid for another hour. Drain, rinse, and then cook as above…

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Our Bondi olives

These olives were picked from our own trees here at Bondi at the end of February and beginning of March this year. They spent about 2 months brining, both black and green, separated by harvest date & slit on two sides – the first week with a daily change of 1/3 of a cup of salt to a litre of water & then a weekly change of the same… In 2013 we harvested about 4.5kg of black and green combined & they have been brining for 2 months. This recipe is for preserving some olives & eating the rest – the jars of olives are even better after a week & will last undisturbed in the cupboard for at least 12 months; once opened will last for about a month in the fridge.

ourkitchengarden.net

Our olives!

Fresh from the garden: olives, rosemary, thyme, sage
Recipe source: Melissa
Makes: 3 jars plus a bowl to eat!

Equipment:

  • Slotted spoon
  • Paper towel
  • 3 small jars with metal lids
  • Knife – small
  • Baking tray
  • Saucepan
  • Oven mitts
  • Small ladle
  • 4 little bowls to serve with separate bowls for pits
Ingredients:

  • 500g black & green olives in brine
  • 1 sprig of rosemary
  • 2 sprigs of sage
  • A small handful of thyme sprigs
  • 4 garlic cloves
  • 1 orange
  • 2 teaspoons fennel seeds
  • 1 teaspoon coriander seeds
  • ½ teaspoon chilli flakes
  • 4 bay leaves
  • 2 or 3 cups extra-virgin olive oil

What to do:

  • Preheat oven to 160°C.
  • Thoroughly wash jars and lids in hot soapy water, rinse well and leave upside down to drain.
  • When the oven is ready, place jars right-side up on the baking tray and slip into the oven for 5-10 minutes until totally dry. Wipe the lids with paper towel to make sure perfectly dry.
  • Meanwhile scoop olives out of the tub and into the colander with the slotted spoon and rinse in cold water, checking each olive and discarding any that are mushy. Pat dry with paper towel.
  • Wash and thoroughly dry all the herbs and strip the leaves from their stalks.
  • Peel the garlic cloves and gently crush each clove with the back of a knife to break.
  • Carefully slice 1 cm-wide strips of zest from the orange, trying to take just the peel and none of the white pith.
  • Pour the olive oil into the saucepan and add the olives, herbs, chilli, bay leaves, fennel seeds, garlic and orange strips. Heat over medium-low heat until warm & smelling lovely.
  • Using oven mitts slide the tray of jars out of the oven. Using the ladle, carefully fill each jar with a good combination of olives, herbs, spices, orange peel, and garlic. Fill right to the top with olive oil and then seal each with its lid.
  • Spoon the remainder into the four little bowls and place each on a plate with a spare to catch the pits.

Notes: Why don’t we use the olives straight from the trees? Why are they green & black? What does ‘marinate’ mean? Why do we heat up the olive oil? What other ingredients could you use?

ourkitchengarden.net

Olives, jarred

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Moroccan carrot dip

Jill says, “Serve this warmly coloured and sweetly spiced Moroccan carrot dip as part of a tabletop spread, along with some olives, flat bread, grills and salad.” We say, “whoa there! This is super-delicious! We used purple as well as normal carrots and with the paprika dye the result was a neon and spiced-up bowl of yum!” And of course I used coriander – not that I’m necessarily anti-parsley – but you just would, wouldn’t you?!

ourkitchengarden.net

Moroccan carrot dip

Fresh from the garden: carrots, garlic, lemon, olives, parsley or coriander
Recipe source: Jill Dupleix
Serves: 6 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Medium saucepan& lid
  • Scales
  • Peelers
  • Chopping board and knife
  • Citrus juicer
  • Measures: tablespoon, ½ teaspoon
  • Bowls – large, small
  • Food processor
  • Spatula
  • Salad spinner
  • Paper towel
  • Serving bowls
Ingredients:

  • 500g carrots
  • 1 garlic clove
  • Half teaspoon ground cumin
  • Half teaspoon paprika
  • Half teaspoon ground ginger
  • Half teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • Pinch of cayenne pepper
  • Flaked salt
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • Half a lemon
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons green olives
  • A small handful flat parsley or coriander leaves

What to do:

  • Fill the saucepan with water and set to boil.
  • Meanwhile peel the garlic clove, then peel the carrots, chop into large chunks and cook in simmering, salted water with the garlic for about 20 minutes or until soft.
  • Squeeze the lemon to yield 2 tablespoons juice.
  • Measure out the cumin, paprika, ginger, cinnamon, cayenne, salt, honey and lemon juice into a small bowl.
  • Drain the carrots into the colander, and return to the hot, dry pan for a minute or two over medium heat to dry them out further.
  • Mash or whiz the carrots and garlic in the food processor until smooth. Add the bowl of spices, salt, honey and lemon juice and mix well or whiz again, scraping down with the spatula when needed.
  • Add the olive oil gradually, while still beating. Allow to cool for a minute or two.
  • Wash, spin-dry and chop the parsley or coriander leaves to yield 2 tablespoons.
  • Spoon into serving bowls, scatter with olives and parsley leaves and drizzle with a little extra olive oil to serve.

 Notes: Where is Morocco? What other spices can you think of? What is cayenne?

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Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall’s chickpea, potato and kale curry

Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall is a British chef, famous for the TV show ‘River Cottage’ and his support of real food, local and seasonal foods, and humanely produced livestock .

Fresh from the garden: potatoes, kale, onion, coriander

Equipment:

  • Bowls – glass, large
  • Saucepans – med, large
  • Sieve & colander
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Microplane zester
  • Salad spinner
  • Peeler
  • Measures – jug, tablespoon, teaspoon, ½ teaspoon
  • Scales
  • Frying pan
  • Mortar & pestle
  • Wooden spoon
  • Serving bowls
Ingredients:

  • 300g dried chickpeas (or 2 tins, drained and rinsed)
  • 1 teaspoon cumin seeds, plus a little extra to garnish
  • 1 teaspoon coriander seeds
  • ½ teaspoon mustard seeds
  • 1 hot, dried red chilli, crumbled
  • 1 teaspoon ground turmeric
  • 2.5cm piece fresh ginger
  • 1 tablespoon rice bran oil
  • 1 large onion
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 700ml chicken or vegetable stock
  • 250g potatoes
  • 150g kale (or cabbage)
  • Greek yogurt, to serve
  • A small handful coriander leaves

What to do:

  • Soak the chickpeas overnight in plenty of cold water.
  • Next day, drain, rinse and simmer them for about 30 minutes in fresh ­water until tender, then drain. (If using tinned, just drain and rinse.)
  • Peel and grate the ginger with the microplane zester. Peel, halve and finely slice the onion. Peel and finely chop the garlic. Peel and chop the potato into 3cm dice.
  • Wash and shake the kale leaves dry. Strip the leaves from the stem (discarding the stem) and finely shred the leaves. Wash and spin-dry the coriander and finely chop.
  • Put the frying pan over a medium heat and, when hot, dry-toast the cumin, coriander seeds and mustard seeds and the chilli for a couple of minutes ­until they smell ­really fragrant and the mustard starts to pop. Grind to a powder with the pestle and mortar, and mix in the turmeric and ginger.
  • Heat the oil in a large saucepan over a medium heat, and fry the onion, stirring regularly, until soft and golden brown. Stir in the garlic and spices, leave to cook for a minute or two, and add the stock. Simmer for five minutes, then add the chickpeas and potatoes. Cook until the spuds are tender, then add the kale. Cook for a few minutes, until the greens are tender, then serve with a dollop of thick yogurt on top, along with a ­sprinkling of toasted cumin seeds and some coriander leaves.

Notes: Why do we dry-toast the spices? What does to shred the leaves mean?

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