Posts Tagged With: Gordon Ramsay

Gordon Ramsay’s broccoli soup

Quite often here in the cottage we prepare dishes with loads of ingredients… here is a recipe with very few! Simple and delicious… at home you can also add some walnuts to the finished soup if you like.

Fresh from the garden: broccoli

Equipment:

  • 2 large stockpots, 1 lid
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Bowls – large
  • Colander
  • Slotted spoon
  • Blender
  • Measuring – tablespoon
  • Ladle
  • Bowls to serve
Ingredients:

  • 2 large broccoli heads
  • Cooking & flaked salt
  • Ground black pepper
  • Water
  • Extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 small log of goats’ cheese, preferably ashed

What to do:

  • Fill one of the stockpots with water and set to boil.
  • Cut the broccoli into florets the size of a golf ball and wash, shake dry.
  • When the water is at a rapid boil, add a tablespoon of cooking salt and then carefully drop in the broccoli and replace the lid to return to the boil.
  • You will want to slice your goats’ cheese at this point. Dip the knife into the boiling hot water before each slice for even, smooth slices.
  • Your broccoli is finished cooking when you can pierce it with little or no effort – should be about 4 minutes but check first.
  • Place the colander over the 2nd stockpot, and then drain the broccoli into it, reserving the hot broccoli water.
  • Using the slotted spoon, add the broccoli to the blender to fill about ¾ of the way and then pour enough of the broccoli water in to fill the blender half way. Add a pinch of flaked salt. Use several pulses on your blender to break the broccoli up and then puree for several seconds. Check the seasoning.
  • Place the slices of goats’ cheese into the centre of your serving bowls and then carefully pour the soup around.
  • Drizzle lightly with a trickle of olive oil and serve at once.

Notes: Why do we put the lid on the stockpot when boiling water? What does ashed goats’ cheese taste like?

Categories: Kitchen Garden, Recipe | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Kitchen news – 2nd August 2012

With a crack of the starting pistol, we’re off! The Olympic fortnight has leapt from the springboard here in the cottage and we’ve been dishing up gold with our Brit chefs’ middle-eastern inspired menu of winning dishes… First up is a wonderful almost-spring (or almost-autumn, depending on which side of the world you are) recipe from Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall of chickpea, kale and potato curry, with Simon Rimmer’s carrot and chickpea falafel with herb yoghurt and pita bread, Gordon Ramsay’s very simple broccoli soup , Rose Elliott’s beetroot and quinoa tabbouleh and a wonderful dessert from the fab Jamie Oliver, who is right now trying to start up  a UK-version of a Kitchen Garden project inspired by our very own SAKGP, stewed rhubarb with vanilla yoghurt. Look for the recipes on this site soon!

We had a visit to the cottage yesterday afternoon from Mr Fielding and Mr Patterson, the School Education Directors and a group of potential SED high school students, who rolled up their sleeves and got stuck in with 5/6P… Much thanks to Fort St High, JJ Cahill Memorial, Sydney Secondary College and Randwick Girls’ for supplying us with such generous and talented cooks: well done Harriet, Henry, Olympia, Ciaran, Vickie & Gabriella for helping out so beautifully! And thanks always to Ms Parry, Ms Kendall, super-Ellie and Jill (our Wednesday arvo regular) – the food was extra-delicious…

And thanks again to all our volunteers for continuing to support our little program – every week I see and hear more and more reference in the newspapers, magazines, books and radio to the benefits of exposing children to good food, vegetables and ‘real food’ cooking, along with the necessity of organic horticulture and lessons of recycling, re-using etc and feel that we’re doing our small bit for the future health and well-being of our kids and the planet. Hooray!

And only one thing left to say now: Come on Aussies, come on!!!

Categories: Kitchen Garden | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Spinach, feta and pumpkin frittate

Fresh from the garden: eggs, spinach, pumpkin, marjoram, thyme

Recipe source: adapted from a recipe by Gordon Ramsay ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

The original recipe calls for sweet potato instead of pumpkin: I think either works well. Gordon also suggests cooking in one big pan over heat and then finishing under the grill, but we pour ours into muffin pans to oven-bake… we also add some of our lovely Bondi herbs for an aromatic twist.

Equipment:

  • Metal spoon
  • Chopping board & knives
  • Paper towel
  • Large frying pan
  • Wooden spoon
  • Large bowl
  • Tongs, whisk
  • Cupcake tins: 1 x 12-hole large or 1 x 24-hole mini
Ingredients:

  • 300g pumpkin
  • A large handful of spinach
  • Small handful marjoram and thyme sprigs
  • 3-4 tablespoons olive oil
  • Flaked salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 200g sheep’s feta
  • 20g parmesan
  • 10 large eggs

What to do:

  • Preheat the oven to 180C.
  • Wash the pumpkin & scrape out the seeds, reserving for the chooks.
  • Wash the spinach and shake dry. Cut off the stalks and chop the leaves into 1cm strips, to yield about 150g cut strips.
  • Wash the herbs and pat dry with paper towel. Strip the leaves from the stalks & reserve.
  • Carefully cut the peel from the pumpkin if needed, and then chop flesh evenly into 1cm cubes.
  • Heat the frying pan with the oil and toss in the pumpkin. Season well with salt and pepper. Cook, turning occasionally, for about 4 minutes over medium heat until the potatoes are just tender and lightly golden at the sides.
  • Meanwhile, cut the feta into small cubes and grate the parmesan.
  • Stir the spinach into the pumpkin and cook for 2 minutes until wilted.
  • Then add the cubed feta and gently stir to mix in.
  • In the large bowl, lightly beat the eggs with the herbs, parmesan, a pinch of salt and a grind of pepper.
  • Divide the pumpkin mixture evenly into the cupcake holes, spoon the egg mixture over and bake in the oven: 15 minutes for the mini frittate and 20 minutes for the large.

Notes: Why is the name of this recipe frittate, ending in e? What other vegetables could you use in the recipe? What other animal’s milk makes feta?

Categories: Kitchen Garden, Recipe, School Holiday Program | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: