Posts Tagged With: nasturtiums

Insalata Caprese

IMG_0217

This famous salad from Italy is beautiful in its simplicity, using up all the last of the lovely summer tomatoes and juicy basil and nasturtium leaves.

Fresh from the garden: rocket, baby spinach, young nasturtium leaves, tomatoes, basil
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 4 or 28 tastes

Equipment:

  • Mixing bowls – large, med, small
  • Salad spinner
  • Chopping board & knives
  • Paper towel
  • Tea towel
  • Fork or whisk
  • Tongs
  • Serving bowls

 

Ingredients:

  • A large handful small rocket leaves
  • Some young nasturtium leaves
  • A handful of basil leaves
  • A few handfuls little tomatoes
  • 1 tub bocconcini
  • Extra virgin olive oil
  • Aged balsamic vinegar
  • 1 clove garlic
  • Flaked salt and pepper

What to do:

  1. Wash the leaves very well in a large bowl and several changes of cold water. Dry the leaves very gently in the salad spinner. Repeat this process, working in small batches, until all the leaves and basil (kept separate) have been dried.
  2. Lay out a tea towel and line it with paper towel. Spread the dried leaves over the paper and roll the whole lot up like a log. Keep the rolled parcel of leaves in the refrigerator until needed. Rinse and dry the bowl well.
  3. Peel the garlic and slice in two squashing one half slightly. Into one bowl put this half, tear the basil and drop in, pour in a glug of olive oil and sprinkle some salt. Tear each bocconcini into two and add, then chop each tomato into two – or chunks if larger – and also place these in, turning a few times.
  4. To make the dressing, rub the other garlic half over the inside of the bowl and drizzle ½ cup olive oil and a little stream of balsamic vinegar over. Lightly whisk dressing.
  5. Unwrap the parcel of salad leaves & tip them into the bowl. Gently turn the leaves in the dressing using your hands or tongs
  6. Use the salad servers to transfer the dressed leaves to the serving bowls, then scoop up tomato/ basil/ bocconcini mixture (discarding garlic half) and pop on top of each, making sure to toss well before serving immediately. 

Notes: What is bocconcini and what does it mean?

Advertisements
Categories: Kitchen Garden, Recipe | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

End of Year salad

This is where we clean out the garden in preparation for the big break… what better to do than throw it all in together?

IMG_1108

Fresh from the garden: all the last veggies of the year…
Recipe source: Melissa

Equipment:

  • Mortar and pestle
  • Citrus juicer
  • Measures: 1/3 cup, teaspoon
  • Teaspoon
  • Scissors
  • Paper towel
  • 2 baking trays
  • Bowls – 2 big, med, 4 small
  • Salad spinner
  • Chopping boards and knives
  • A deep-sided frying pan
  • Slotted spoon

 

 

Ingredients:

  • Kale
  • Cucumbers
  • Salad leaves
  • Bok choy or tatsoi
  • Tomatoes
  • 4 eggs

Herby vinaigrette dressing

  • 1 clove garlic
  • Flaked salt & black pepper
  • 1 lemon
  • 1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • A small handful mixed herbs: tarragon, marjoram, thyme, chives, salad burnet

What to do:

  1. For the dressing: Peel the garlic clove and put it in the mortar with a large pinch of salt. Gently pound to a paste. Juice the lemon and add the juice to the mortar (without pips) then stir the lot with the teaspoon and scrape it into the large bowl. Stir in the oil and grind some pepper, then whisk the dressing lightly. Wash and spin dry the herbs, pick off the leaves and snip finely with the scissors. Add to the dressing.
  2. For the crispy kale: Preheat oven to 180C. Wash the kale really well, checking for bugs or cocoons, and using scissors, cut the leaves from the stalks in large pieces. Spin leaves dry in the salad spinner, then dry extra well with paper towel, then place in a bowl and add in a few pinches of flaked salt and drizzle of olive oil. Massage all the flavour into the kale for a minute, then lay out on the baking trays and slide into the oven for 5 to 7 minutes until crispy.
  3. For the salad: Fill up the 2 big bowls with cold water & wash the salad leaves in several changes of water. Spin dry and wipe the bowls dry. Fill the small bowl with water and wash the small garnishing leaves and flowers. Reserve them carefully on a piece of paper towel then keep separate in the bowl.
  4. Wash the tomatoes and drain and then slice any large ones in half without squashing! Wash the cucumbers, peel alternating strips of each one and then slice into thin discs.
  5. To poach eggs: Fill the deep-sided frying pan 5cm deep with water and bring to a simmer. Fill the large bowl with cold water. Carefully crack each egg into a small bowl without breaking it and then carefully slide into the water. Let the pan sit for 4 minutes on the lowest heat before removing each egg into the bowl of cold water with a slotted spoon and reserving until needed.
  6. Add the salad leaves to the bowl with the herbs and the dressing. Gently turn the leaves in the dressing using a clean hand without squishing the leaves.
  7. Pile up the dressed leaves into the serving bowls with the  tomatoes and cucumber, sprinkle over the crispy kale, then carefully drain an egg and place in each bowl with the garnishing petals. Serve immediately.
Categories: Kitchen Garden, Recipe | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Green salad

The title is simple but the ingredients are many and varied! Just take care when washing young delicate leaves so that they don’t get squashed…

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: rocket, lettuces, pea shoots, baby spinach, kale, spring onions, herbs
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 4 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  • Mixing bowls – 3 big, 2 med, 2 small
  • Colanders
  • 2 salad spinners
  • Scissors
  • Paper towel
  • Measuring – 1/4 cup, tablespoon, teaspoon
  • A small jar with lid
  • Bowlsto serve

 

Ingredients:

  • A few stalks of kale
  • A large handful of rocket
  • A large handful lettuce leaves
  • A large handful pea shoots
  • A large handful baby spinach
  • A small bunch of spring onions
  • Edible flowers
  • A handful baby nasturtium leaves
  • A bunch of aromatic herbs: marjoram, basil, thyme, coriander
  • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
  • A teaspoon of honey
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • Flaked salt & black pepper

What to do:

  • Wash the kale and shake dry. Cut the leaves from the stalks and discard the stalks. Roll up the kale leaves into a tube shape and then finely slice into very thin ribbons.
  • Wash all the leaves & pea shoots in several large bowls and many changes of cold water, filling up the bowls with the water and gently swilling the leaves around, draining in the colander and checking each time for any dirt left in the water. Spin dry in handfuls, reserving the leaves in a large clean, dry bowl.
  • Wash and trim the spring onions, discarding any roots and browning layers. Using scissors, snip into tiny discs and add to the bowl of prepared leaves and shoots.
  • Reserve the edible flowers and nasturtium leaves in a small bowl of cold water. When ready to use, drain on a piece of paper towel and use for the garnish.
  • Wash & dry the herb sprigs, leaving small leaves whole and chopping or snipping with scissors any large leaves and the coriander stalks into tiny pieces.
  • For the dressing, measure the olive oil, vinegar and honey and pour them into the jar. Add all the herbs with a sprinkle of salt and pepper, then put the lid on & give the jar a good shake.
  • Drizzle the dressing around the leaves and gently turn the leaves with your fingers so that all the leaves are covered. Lift out and drain the dressed leaves, dividing into serving bowls.
  • Finish by popping the edible flowers and nasturtium leaves on top of the bowls of salad. Serve immediately!

Notes: Why do we have to be so gentle when preparing these leaves and pea shoots? What is vinaigrette? What do the edible flowers taste like?

Categories: Kitchen Garden, Recipe | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

February 23rd 2012

First kitchen news of the year and it’s already week 5, ooh la la!

Talking of which, we celebrated le jour de crepes on Tuesday here in the cottage with 5/6P & flipped up a revolution with spinach & goats’ cheese pancakes with ratatouille and pikelets with lemongrass syrup and vanilla mascarpone – served up with our ever-morphing salad, now with green beans, bush tomatoes, nasturtiums & tarragon vinaigrette…

I’m also continuing  my introductory talks with the children, recapping on safety issues and expectations of being in the kitchen and what I can promise for the year… those classes have been heavy on discussion (with plenty of arms raise for comment!) but we’ve managed to fit in some fun cooking at the end too – pounding loads of basil to make pesto; rolling out rosemary flatbreads to cook off in the pan; infusing vegetable oil with garden herbs to pop corn in (and exploding out like a never-ending  volcano in Ms Hamblin’s class 3E!); squeezing garlic & juicing lemons to wilt with spinach… lots of great cooking noises & ending in delicious dishes that we’ve all loved!

And I must say huge congratulations to all the students in classes 3E & 3H for gaining their Knife Licences! Each student demonstrated how to pick up & hold a big Santoku knife & show how to do the ‘Bear Paw’ (raaaahhhhh) and then pick and up and hold a small Paring knife and slice gently through a (very squashy) bush tomato without all the seeds oozing out. They all passed with flying colours with each student being awarded their own named licence – and will able to experience even more with each recipe from now on.

So all in all, lovely work these last weeks, and with the dappled sun shining through the trees and the birds singing their song, and the beautiful new deck and landscaping looking like they’ve always been here, life down here in the cottage is good! A big thanks to all the huge amounts of volunteers that have turned out to support the kitchen & garden classes so far in 2012 – we are so impressed and hope that you enjoy your time here!

Bon appétit! And don’t forget to check out the recipes on bondikitchengarden.com

Melissa

Categories: Kitchen Garden | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: