Posts Tagged With: mint

Watermelon, pomegranate and feta salad

Fruits such as watermelon, melon or pomegranate have a myriad of uses – and not all of them sweet! This salad is perfect example of mixing fruit with savoury ingredients.

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: watermelon, pomegranates, mint, rocket
Recipe source: Melissa
Serves: 6 or 24 tastes

Equipment:

  •       Chopping boards & knives
  •       A selection of mixing bowls
  •       Kitchen towel
  •       Salad spinner
  •       Scales
  •       Measuring jug
  •       Fork
  •       Serving bowls
Ingredients:

  •       A large wedge of watermelon
  •       1 small red onion
  •       1 pomegranate
  •       5 sprigs of fresh mint
  •       A handful of rocket
  •       80 – 100g Danish feta
  •       Flaked salt and black pepper

Dressing ingredients

  •       60ml extra virgin olive oil
  •       30ml white balsamic vinegar

What to do:

  1. Wash the watermelon and then carefully cut into 1-2cm slices – you may need to ask a grown up to help. Slice off the peel and then cut each slice into thick bite-sized triangles. Reserve in a large bowl.
  2. Remove the seeds from the pomegranate by cutting it in half. Hold one half over a bowl and smash it with a wooden spoon from the outside. This will capture the juice and seeds for the salad, and add to the watermelon.
  3. Peel the red onion and finely chop. Add it to the salad.
  4. Wash and spin-dry the mint leaves, then pick from the stalks and tear up into tiny pieces into the salad.
  5. Wash and spin-dry the rocket and add it into the bowl too.
  6. Measure the olive oil and balsamic into a small bowl and whisk with a fork to combine. Crumble the feta over the salad and then pour the dressing over with a grind of pepper and a sprinkle of flaked salt.
  7. Toss gently to combine then divide into your serving bowls.

Notes: What is a pomegranate? What other savoury ingredients go well with fruit?

ourkitchengarden.net

Advertisements
Categories: Kitchen Garden, Recipe | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Herbal tisane

ourkitchengarden.net

Alice says, ‘A tisane is a fresh tea, an infusion of fragrant herbs, or flowers or spices, in boiling water. It is a soothing a refreshing finish to a meal, is complementary to most desserts, and offers a mild alternative to coffee. Tisane can be made from such flavourings as lemon verbena, mint, lemon thyme, lemon balm, hyssop, chamomile, citrus rind and ginger – alone and in combination. The one I make most is a combination of mint and lemon verbena. It is very beautiful made in a glass teapot so you can see the brilliant green leaves… I like to use small clear tea glasses, as they do in Morocco, so the lovely pale green colour is visible.’

Fresh from the garden: your choice of fresh herbs – English mint, spearmint, peppermint, lemon verbena, chamomile flowers, lemon thyme – orange, cumquat or lemon rind – ginger, cinnamon

Recipe source: adapted from a recipe by Alice Waters in The Art of Simple Food

Equipment:

  • Measuring jug
  • Saucepan with lid
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Ladle
  • Tea cups or glasses
Ingredients:

  • A large handful of herb stalks, leaves and/or flowers
  • A thumb-sized knob of ginger or a stick of two of cinnamon or cassia bark
  • 2 litres of water

What to do: 

  • Measure the water into the saucepan and heat on high to boil.
  • Wash the herbs in several changes of water and shake dry.
  • Rinse the ginger, if using, and chop into thin slices, skin on.
  • When the water in the saucepan is boiling, carefully drop in the herbs and pieces of ginger.
  • Turn the heat off and let the tisane steep for several minutes.
  • Ladle into cups or glasses to serve.

Notes: What is a tisane? What other herbal combinations can you think of?

Categories: Kitchen Garden, Recipe | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Strawberry & mint muffins

ourkitchengarden.net

There are a few different procedures here so lots for young chefs to do! You can use any berries but we love the juicy strawberries ripening in our garden right now… and we love the crazy herb combination!

Fresh from the garden: strawberries, mint, eggs
Recipe source: Melissa
Makes: 24

Equipment:

  • 2 x 12-hole large cupcake tins
  • Paper muffin cases
  • Bowls – large, medium
  • Colander
  • Stick blender & bowl
  • Chopping board and small knife
  • Measures – cup, ½ cup, 1/3 cup
  • Stand mixer & bowl
  • Whisk
  • Spatula
  • Skewer
  • Serving plates
Ingredients:

  • 500g strawberries
  • A small bunch mint
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 4 cups self-raising flour
  • 1 cup caster sugar plus 2 tablespoons
  • 4 eggs
  • 400g plain yoghurt
  • 100ml milk
  • 2/3 cup vegetable oil

 

 What to do:

  • Preheat the oven to 180C.
  • Line the muffin tin with the muffin cases.
  • Wash the strawberries and hull them, discarding the leaves into the compost. Divide strawberries into 2 lots.
  • Take one lot of strawberries and chop each into eight and add to a large bowl.
  • Wash the mint and strip off the leaves, discarding the stem. Tear or chop up the leaves into small pieces and add to the chopped strawberries with one tablespoon of caster sugar and 2 teaspoons of vanilla. Gently mix together and leave to soak.
  • Take the remaining berries and add them to the stick blender bowl. Sprinkle 1 tablespoon caster onto them and then blitz to puree.
  • Measure out the flour and sugar into the bowl of the stand mixer and turn on for a minute to mix.
  • Whisk the eggs in the medium bowl and then add with the yoghurt, oil and milk to the mixer. Add the strawberry puree and mix again until well combined.
  • Remove the bowl from the stand and using the spatula, gently fold through the chopped strawberries.
  • Spoon into the muffin cases evenly.
  • Carefully slide into the oven and bake for 20 minutes until a skewer inserted into the middle of the muffin comes out clean.
  • Divide among serving plates and eat!

Notes: What other herbs go well with strawberries? Why do we leave the strawberries to soak? Why should the skewer come out clean when the muffins are cooked?

Categories: Kitchen Garden, Recipe | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Rhubarb and mint muffins

Fresh from the garden: eggs, rhubarb, mint

Recipe source: Melissa

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

These are super-easy to whip up and delicious warm from the oven! You can substitute any berries and we love the herby addition of English or chocolate mint.

Equipment:

  • 12-hole muffin tin
  • Paper muffin cases
  • Bowls – large, medium
  • Colander
  • Chopping board and small knife
  • Measures – cup, ½ cup, 1/3 cup
  • Stand mixer & bowl
  • Whisk
  • Spatula
  • Skewer
  • Serving plates
Ingredients:

  • 2 eggs
  • 1/3 cup vegetable oil
  • 2 cups self-raising flour
  • ½ cup caster sugar
  • 1 cup yoghurt
  • 1 large or several small stalks of rhubarb
  • A sprig of mint

 

 

What to do:

  • Preheat the oven to 180C.
  • Line the muffin tin with the muffin cases.
  • Wash the rhubarb stalk, then drain it into the colander. Chop all the leaves off and discard into the compost. Peel off any stringy fibres and then cut into very thin slices to yield one cup.
  • Wash the mint and strip off the leaves, discarding the stem. Chop the leaves finely.
  • Measure out the flour and sugar into the bowl of the stand mixer and turn on for a minute to mix.
  • Whisk the eggs in the medium bowl and then add with the yoghurt and oil to the mixer and mix again until well combined.
  • Remove the bowl from the stand and using the spatula, gently fold through the sliced rhubarb and chopped mint.
  • Spoon into the muffin cases evenly.
  • Carefully slide into the oven and bake for 20 minutes until a skewer inserted into the middle of the muffin comes out clean.
  • Divide among serving plates and eat!

Notes: Why is it so important to remove all the rhubarb leaves? Why do we strip off the fibres? Why should the skewer come out clean when the muffins are cooked?

Categories: Kitchen Garden, Recipe, School Holiday Program | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: