Posts Tagged With: sauces

Sweet chilli sauce

Banish that gloopy coloured rubbish from your cupboards! This is easy-peasy to make & delish… and if you bottle up any remaining sauce in a sterilised jar, it will last for ages!

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: chillies
Recipe source: adapted from a recipe by Kylie Kwong
Makes: about 250ml 

Equipment:

  • Measures – jug, tablespoon
  • Small heavy-based saucepan
  • Bowls – small
  • Scales
  • Chopping board and knife
  • Wooden spoon
  • Sauce bowl
Ingredients:

  • 250ml white vinegar
  • 165g white sugar
  • 2½ tablespoons fish sauce
  • 1 large red chilli

 

What to do:

  • Place vinegar and sugar in the small saucepan and bring to the boil, stirring to dissolve the sugar.
  • Reduce heat and simmer, uncovered, for about 10 minutes until liquid is reduced by almost half and slightly syrupy.
  • Remove from heat and allow to cool.
  • Meanwhile, slice down the length of the chilli and carefully scrape out the seeds and white membrane and discard. Chop the chilli into super-thin slices and add to the syrup with the fish sauce.
  • Stir well, then divide among little sauce bowls and serve.

Caution:

  • Wash your hands thoroughly after coming in contact with chilli, as the capsaicin (the oil within the chilli) burns when it comes in contact with your eyes or sensitive skin.

 Notes: Why do you need to wash your hands if handling chill? What is capsaicin? What other sauces could you make at home? What does fish sauce smell like?

ourkitchengharden.net

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Categories: Kitchen Garden, Recipe | Tags: , , , , , , | 1 Comment

People-powered pesto!

For a spicy alternative, rocket leaves can be added to the basil and pounded together or you might like to try a parsley combination… Cooked chickpeas can be used in place of the pine nuts in case of allergy.

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: basil
Recipe source: adapted from a recipe by Alice Waters in The Art of Simple Food
Makes: about 3 cups

Equipment:

  • Bowls – big, med, small
  • Scales
  • Salad spinner
  • Cheese grater
  • Medium frying pan
  • Mortar & pestle
  • Tea towel
  • Measuring jug
  • Tablespoon
  • Serving bowls if needed
Ingredients:

  • 1 big bunch basil, to yield about 100g
  • 1 large clove garlic
  • Salt
  • 80g pine nuts
  • 50g parmesan cheese
  • 200ml extra virgin olive oil

 

What to do:

  • Pick the basil leaves from the stalks and weigh before you wash them!
  • Then wash in several changes of water and thoroughly spin-dry the basil.
  • Grate the parmesan cheese.
  • Heat the frying pan on a medium heat and lightly dry-toast the pine nuts, shaking regularly so that they don’t stick.
  • Peel the garlic clove and place in the mortar and pestle with a good pinch of salt. Pound these to a paste.
  • Add the pine nuts to the mortar & pestle and continue to pound. Once smooth-ish, transfer to the bowl and stir in the parmesan.
  • Tear the basil leaves and put them into the mortar with a sprinkle of flaked salt. Pound the leaves to a paste. Return the pine nut mixture to the mortar and, pounding it all together, gradually pour in all the olive oil.
  • Taste for seasoning and adjust if necessary.
  • Mix into steaming hot pasta, spread on bruschetta, drizzle over tomato slices, serve as part of an antipasto plate with goats’ cheese and roasted capsicum or spoon into serving bowls to serve as a dip with flatbreads.

Notes: What else can you use with pesto? What also goes with well with basil? Why do we toast the pine nuts? Can you name any other pasta sauces?

ourkitchengarden.net

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Basil aioli

Herby? Garlicky? Yup, ticks all the boxes… yum yum yum! Hooray for mayonnaise!

ourkitchengarden.net

Fresh from the garden: lemon, eggs, basil, garlic
Recipe source: Melissa
Makes: about 300ml

Equipment:

  • Salad spinner
  • Bowls – large, small
  • Chopping board & knife
  • Citrus juicer
  • Garlic press
  • Stick blender & cup
  • Measuring – jug, cup, teaspoon
  • Serving bowls

Ingredients:

  • A small handful basil
  • 1 juicy lemon
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 1 cup rice bran oil
  • Flaked salt & black pepper

What to do:

  • Pick the basil leaves, wash them well, spin them dry and finely chop.
  • Cut the lemon in half and juice the halves. You will need 50ml lemon juice in total.
  • Smash the garlic cloves, peel them and squeeze them through the garlic press.
  • Separate two of the eggs and reserve the 2 yolks in a small bowl.
  • Into the stick blender cup add the whole egg, the egg yolks, the mustard and only 20ml lemon juice. Whizz together until all is combined.
  • Measure the rice bran oil, then get a friend to help super-slowly stream in the oil into the egg mixture while you are whizzing (this takes a few minutes so don’t rush it).
  • To make this mayo into an aioli, slowly add in the remaining 30ml lemon juice, the pressed garlic, the chopped basil and a good sprinkle of salt and pepper. Blend until smooth.

Notes: What is aioli? Why is it different to mayonnaise? What else could you serve it with? What could you make with the leftover egg whites?

Categories: Kitchen Garden, Recipe | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Rocket and basil pesto

For this alternative pesto, we add rocket leaves to the basil and pound them together but you could also try a parsley or even coriander combination… We love them all! It also seems like a lot of olive oil so tone it back if you like, but I think it’s warranted, especially over freshly cooked pasta & muddled with a ladleful of  pasta-water!

ourkitchengarden.net

Handmade pasta, rocket & basil pesto

Fresh from the garden: rocket, basil, garlic
Recipe source: Melissa
Makes: 3 cups

Equipment:

  • Mortar & pestle
  • Cheese grater
  • Medium frying pan
  • Tea towel
  • Scales
  • Measuring jug
  • Medium bowl
  • Tablespoon
  • Serving bowls if needed
Ingredients:

  • 1 bunch basil
  • 1 bunch rocket
  • 2 large garlic cloves
  • Salt
  • 80g pine nuts
  • 50g parmesan cheese
  • 200ml extra virgin olive oil

What to do:

  • Before you wash the basil or rocket, pick the stalks from the basil and discard. Weigh the leaves with the rocket – you’ll need about 100g all up.
  • Wash and then spin-dry the basil and rocket, you might need to do this in several stages to make sure the leaves are as dry as can be!
  • Grate the parmesan cheese.
  • Heat the frying pan on a medium heat and lightly dry-toast the pine nuts, shaking regularly so that they don’t stick.
  • Peel the garlic cloves and place in the mortar and pestle with a good pinch of salt. Pound these to a paste.
  • Add the pine nuts to the mortar & pestle and continue to pound. Once smooth-ish, transfer to the bowl and stir in the parmesan.
  • Tear the basil leaves and put them into the mortar. Pound the leaves to a paste. Return the pine nut mixture to the mortar and, pounding it all together, gradually pour in all the olive oil.
  • Taste for salt and adjust if necessary.
  • Mix into steaming hot pasta, spread on bruschetta, drizzle over tomato slices, serve as part of an antipasto plate with goats’ cheese and roasted capsicum or spoon into serving bowls to serve as a dip with flatbreads.

Notes: With what else can you use pesto? What also goes with well with basil? Why do we toast the pine nuts? What does several mean? Why do we weigh the leaves before we wash them?

Categories: Kitchen Garden, Recipe | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

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